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?? is 27 TOO OLD to begin medical school ??

  • hell no

    Votes: 189 62.2%
  • no

    Votes: 73 24.0%
  • maybe

    Votes: 18 5.9%
  • yes

    Votes: 3 1.0%
  • hell yes

    Votes: 7 2.3%
  • valar morghulis

    Votes: 30 9.9%
  • just do it

    Votes: 35 11.5%
  • conquer your fear

    Votes: 22 7.2%
  • you will regret it (I regret it)

    Votes: 7 2.3%
  • you can always leave

    Votes: 5 1.6%

  • Total voters
    304

myMDdreams

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Hi!

I have some data for you:

ACADEMIC

Pre-med in undergrad, Psych degree (2009-2013) <- calling schools and checking whether pre-reqs expire

3.7 sci GPA, 3.8 non-sci GPA

I am taking the MCAT in August (took the old version in 2014 and received 29~ 8 PS, 10 BS, 11 V)
If I get a competitive MCAT score, I will apply in 2017.

PERSONAL

single female
no kids
no debts

I haven't applied yet because of fear/self-doubt/poor work ethic for the 2014 MCAT. I also live in NYC so I've been enjoying my post-graduate life a little too much.

Alas, I decided it's time to grow up and advance my career. I will take the MCAT this summer and I will decide whether I have what it takes to purse a career in medicine [514+ or go home].

I would appreciate some quick input about my age (I am currently 25). I know age is just a number but I am a realistic optimist who likes to consider various factors.

Some of my worries:
~At 27, I won't have the same mental quickness as someone who is 24 (average age of matriculant).
~I won't have the physical stamina.
~I will be a pregnant resident (31-34/35) if I choose to have kids.

I am using a relatively rigorous MCAT cut off in order to critically gauge my capabilities. Also, despite doubts about my age, I am 100% committed to take the exam in August.

Please share your stories and/or take the poll!

Many thanks!
 

doc05

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27 is not too old. but your defeatist attitude is unacceptable. so don't bother.
 
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Slack3r

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There are people in my class who matriculated in their mid-late 30s. If you actually want to do it, then do it.
 
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togaedere

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I sincerely doubt you will feel behind your peers because of reduced "physical stamina" or "mental quickness" at age 27. I'm female, started medical school at age 32. Took a bit to adjust but ended up graduating in top quartile. My age was undoubtedly a strength.

I am now 36, recently married, and am planning on having children in residency. One day you will also reach your mid-30s and realize it's actually not that old.

Hi!

I have some data for you:

ACADEMIC

Pre-med in undergrad, Psych degree (2009-2013) <- calling schools and checking whether pre-reqs expire

3.7 sci GPA, 3.8 non-sci GPA

I am taking the MCAT in August (took the old version in 2014 and received 29~ 8 PS, 10 BS, 11 V)
If I get a competitive MCAT score, I will apply in 2017.

PERSONAL

single female
no kids
no debts

I haven't applied yet because of fear/self-doubt/poor work ethic for the 2014 MCAT. I also live in NYC so I've been enjoying my post-graduate life a little too much.

Alas, I decided it's time to grow up and advance my career. I will take the MCAT this summer and I will decide whether I have what it takes to purse a career in medicine [514+ or go home].

I would appreciate some quick input about my age (I am currently 25). I know age is just a number but I am a realistic optimist who likes to consider various factors.

Some of my worries:
~At 27, I won't have the same mental quickness as someone who is 24 (average age of matriculant).
~I won't have the physical stamina.
~I will be a pregnant resident (31-34/35) if I choose to have kids.

I am using a relatively rigorous MCAT cut off in order to critically gauge my capabilities. Also, despite doubts about my age, I am 100% committed to take the exam in August.

Please share your stories and/or take the poll!

Many thanks!
 
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D

deleted763299

Some of my worries:
~At 27, I won't have the same mental quickness as someone who is 24 (average age of matriculant).
~I won't have the physical stamina.
~I will be a pregnant resident (31-34/35) if I choose to have kids.

I will restrict my reply to addressing these concerns. You make it sound as though being 27 puts you on the edge of decrepitude and dementia.
  1. Your "mental quickness" should not be any different than your peers in their early 20's. Unless you have medical problems that can affect this.
  2. Your physical stamina has more to do with how you treat your body than your age, especially early in life (which you are). Unless you have medical problems that can affect this.
  3. As far as pregnancy, being male limits my insight. However, I've worked with plenty of pregnant residents that make it work.
If being a doctor is really what you want, then go for it!
 
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Taddy Mason

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30 and just finished 2nd year. A number of my classmates are older than I am - you're not too old. The worst part is the immaturity and lack of real life experience in my classmates that went straight into med school at 21-23 without any of the aforementioned.
 
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myMDdreams

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Thanks everyone! I really, really appreciate your responses! I understand that some may consider my fears as silly but I needed an objective perspective from current students. Thank you so much for your help!!! And good luck to you all!
 

PL198

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30 and just finished 2nd year. A number of my classmates are older than I am - you're not too old. The worst part is the immaturity and lack of real life experience in my classmates that went straight into med school at 21-23 without any of the aforementioned.

the worst part is the 30 year olds who think working some dead end job for 5 years means they know everything and the people who didn't are immature.

those 21-23 yr olds are in the same position as you, and almost 10 years younger. I think most would pick to be them instead of you.

there's plus and minuses to both but the non-trads have huge complexes in my experience.
 
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togaedere

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I agree, age doesn't guarantee that someone is mature. I also think there's a lot of stuff that comes up in med school that I'm glad I was able to handle better being the age I was. I don't think I would have done well with the pressure coming straight out of undergrad.

To the OP, age only becomes an issue if you let it. Classmates, residents, even attendings will sometimes be younger than you are, and you can either let that get to you or you can just let it go.

the worst part is the 30 year olds who think working some dead end job for 5 years means they know everything and the people who didn't are immature.

those 21-23 yr olds are in the same position as you, and almost 10 years younger. I think most would pick to be them instead of you.

there's plus and minuses to both but the non-trads have huge complexes in my experience.
 
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MerYangBey

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Wow I thought I worried too much...
Take things as they come.
Do what you think works for you.
The difference between 23 to 27 is minimal in my opinion.
It's almost like you're trying to convince yourself not to apply. The question is do you really wanna be a doctor? If so being a couple years older than your classmates shouldn't be a big deal.
 
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Dr.Kitty

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Do you want to be 31 years old and a doctor or 31 years old and not a doctor? It's as simple as that. There are students that matriculate at 50+ of age, it's never too late to chase your dreams.
 
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ProspectiveKidd

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Do you want to be 31 years old and a doctor or 31 years old and not a doctor? It's as simple as that. There are students that matriculate at 50+ of age, it's never too late to chase your dreams.

That's what I always tell people that dread the time commitment. The time is going to pass regardless of what you're doing so why not do it if it's what you want.
 
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Jay.bee

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I'm 27 and entering this August. As far as "mental quickness" is concerned, I am a far more thoughtful person now than I was at the age of 22. I am more thorough in my reasoning, and more capable when considering the consequences of my actions. Note that I am not trying to say that younger people aren't thorough or considerate, as I can only speak to my own experience in this regard.

I will be turning 28 soon after matriculating and do not feel too old at all. On the contrary, I actually feel that this is the correct time in my life to start. The question you need to ask yourself is, is this the right time for you? Note that this is not a question of "are you ready?" but something else entirely, because many people never feel ready.

Additionally, I wouldn't try to constrict your dreams to a 514+ score either, that is a bit unreasonable and adds even more stress to your study experience. Do not focus on getting any certain score, instead try to focus your studies so that you are always improving at the best pace possible--this is all that you can do. Find your problem areas, and focus on them. Even if you get a 505 you can still get in, and it is unlikely to change your career path significantly, your STEP scores will be much more important in this regard.

Best of luck, and try to keep it all in perspective. We all want to do this to help people and have a truly substantive career. If we were doing it for love of money or partying, we would go into different fields with shorter work hours and less training.
 
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Goro

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What does your heart tell you?????



Hi!

I have some data for you:

ACADEMIC

Pre-med in undergrad, Psych degree (2009-2013) <- calling schools and checking whether pre-reqs expire

3.7 sci GPA, 3.8 non-sci GPA

I am taking the MCAT in August (took the old version in 2014 and received 29~ 8 PS, 10 BS, 11 V)
If I get a competitive MCAT score, I will apply in 2017.

PERSONAL

single female
no kids
no debts

I haven't applied yet because of fear/self-doubt/poor work ethic for the 2014 MCAT. I also live in NYC so I've been enjoying my post-graduate life a little too much.

Alas, I decided it's time to grow up and advance my career. I will take the MCAT this summer and I will decide whether I have what it takes to purse a career in medicine [514+ or go home].

I would appreciate some quick input about my age (I am currently 25). I know age is just a number but I am a realistic optimist who likes to consider various factors.

Some of my worries:
~At 27, I won't have the same mental quickness as someone who is 24 (average age of matriculant).
~I won't have the physical stamina.
~I will be a pregnant resident (31-34/35) if I choose to have kids.

I am using a relatively rigorous MCAT cut off in order to critically gauge my capabilities. Also, despite doubts about my age, I am 100% committed to take the exam in August.

Please share your stories and/or take the poll!

Many thanks!
 

ChrissV26

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You're not too old. The mental quickness part is nuts!
But I'd be aware you'll face different challenges than your younger colleagues. The pregnancy during residency is obvious, but less obvious might be the pressure to choose a shorter residency and get the resultant income. Many of the older students I know ended up choosing 3 or 4 year residencies that don't require specialization afterward.

On the flip side, I thought they had a certain maturity that my friends who went straight from college to med school lacked. They were a little more grounded from prior experiences and didn't tend to part as hard.

It's a double edged sword. I'd just really, really be aware of how long the road is. It's not four years of medical school. It's a MINIMUM of 7 years of medical school and residency. That's just the minimum. Really think about how 5 AM is going to feel at 34 years old with children at home.

Good luck!
Chris
 
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Mansamusa

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It's too old if you were hoping to retire in your 40s. Otherwise, not at all..
 
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Mansamusa

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You're not too old. The mental quickness part is nuts!
But I'd be aware you'll face different challenges than your younger colleagues. The pregnancy during residency is obvious, but less obvious might be the pressure to choose a shorter residency and get the resultant income. Many of the older students I know ended up choosing 3 or 4 year residencies that don't require specialization afterward.

On the flip side, I thought they had a certain maturity that my friends who went straight from college to med school lacked. They were a little more grounded from prior experiences and didn't tend to part as hard.

It's a double edged sword. I'd just really, really be aware of how long the road is. It's not four years of medical school. It's a MINIMUM of 7 years of medical school and residency. That's just the minimum. Really think about how 5 AM is going to feel at 34 years old with children at home.

Good luck!
Chris
I agree with things you said if OP was already 30+, but the OP isn't even old. She's my age and she'll only be starting 2 yrs later than me. Finishing residency at 32 vs 34 isn't really a huge difference, so she'll be facing the same difficulties that most of us will be facing if we want kids.
 
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pfonseca509

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Hi,
I am a Pre-med student and I have been recently going over everything that I need to apply. I have come across a dilemma due to the medical clearance immunization requirements. I received a kidney transplant and have been on immunosuppression for awhile now. I am aware that I am not fully immune to MMR due to that I received the immunization as a child and now no longer can receive a live vaccine. Is there any medical clearance waivers that can be applied to my current circumstance. I appreciate any feedback and help.

Thanks
 

kmp0410

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I was 27 when I started. This is maybe a valid question at 40. But even then...life is about fulfilling your passions so I'd still say go for it.

27 is not old in the slightest. Most students will be like 2-3 years younger than you at most. I think you'll find out that you will never really "feel" that different. You will still be yourself. The old saying is "how old would say you are if you didn't keep count?"

That said, on a contrarian note. It is kind of tough having taken some time away from school working and now going back to living like a student. Especially when alot of people my age are buying cool houses, traveling to europe, etc. and I'm renting crappy apartments. Sometimes I wish I had a little more financial freedom like if I had a steady paying job out of college for the past 5 years. Especially since I'm married and my wife does ok, but not necessarily well enough to totally support two people.

But I'm overall thrilled to be where I am in life. There are pros/cons to anything.
 
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Mansamusa

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Hi,
I am a Pre-med student and I have been recently going over everything that I need to apply. I have come across a dilemma due to the medical clearance immunization requirements. I received a kidney transplant and have been on immunosuppression for awhile now. I am aware that I am not fully immune to MMR due to that I received the immunization as a child and now no longer can receive a live vaccine. Is there any medical clearance waivers that can be applied to my current circumstance. I appreciate any feedback and help.

Thanks
Get into a school (you don't imminizations to apply, just to matriculate)--> contact said school with your question. Good luck!
 

Rekt

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No, but it's too old for a Pikachu avatar.
 
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echidna001

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I'm 30 and will be starting medical school this August. I also have a decent amount of undergrad debt. My age originally concerned me but every physician I've spoken with assured me that I was not "old" by any means and would be able to pay back the debt without trouble. I feel all the life experiences I've had have given me so much more perspective than I would have personally had at 21 years old. I believe my interaction with patients will benefit from the things I've been through, such as going through periods of time myself where I couldn't afford health insurance and had to just hope for the best when something went wrong. Or that lengthy insurance battle I had to fight years later when I was denied coverage for a surgical procedure. I am very glad to be starting this journey at this point in my life and am going to love/appreciate every second of it.

I feel like I have a slightly lower energy level than I did when I was in my early 20's however I also feel being older works in our advantage. I have been dealing with my own finances for 10+ years. I know how to cook amazing food (strange one, but a current M1 I spoke to said a big stressor going into med school was learning how to go grocery shopping/cooking for the first time). I know how to study, have mastered multi-tasking and my mental acuity has actually improved. My point being: in every area you feel you may have a "disadvantage" in, you will also have an equal amount of things playing in your favor. You may not see eye to eye with everyone you meet, but I think it'll be amazing/energizing to have younger colleagues (it's just a bit weird when you realize you still have cassette tapes, a walkman, strong memories of dial up internet and recall that 9/11 occurred when you were a sophomore in high school but realize they were 5 years old).
 
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gonnif

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A past president of the board of trustees of the AMA didnt start medical school until she was 35 and she did pretty well for herself
 

pithy84

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Go for it, 27 is not old at all.

Your 514 MCAT cutoff is way too harsh, especially if you only got a 29 before. If you get a 510, definitely still apply. Maybe push your cutoff down even lower.

510 is a very respectable score.

I'm somewhat afraid you will never go from 29 to 514 (are you aware of the percentile conversions?), so I am afraid you should not set 514 as a goal. Especially because you don't need it (are you aware of the acceptance statistics?).

514 is a score to aspire to, especially if you didn't study prior to your 29, but 514 should absolutely not be a cutoff. You said "514 or go home", and I think that is a recipe for life-long regret. Heck, if you get a 506 in August, why not take it again in December?
 
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Montisumo

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Hi!

I have some data for you:

ACADEMIC

Pre-med in undergrad, Psych degree (2009-2013) <- calling schools and checking whether pre-reqs expire

3.7 sci GPA, 3.8 non-sci GPA

I am taking the MCAT in August (took the old version in 2014 and received 29~ 8 PS, 10 BS, 11 V)
If I get a competitive MCAT score, I will apply in 2017.

PERSONAL

single female
no kids
no debts

I haven't applied yet because of fear/self-doubt/poor work ethic for the 2014 MCAT. I also live in NYC so I've been enjoying my post-graduate life a little too much.

Alas, I decided it's time to grow up and advance my career. I will take the MCAT this summer and I will decide whether I have what it takes to purse a career in medicine [514+ or go home].

I would appreciate some quick input about my age (I am currently 25). I know age is just a number but I am a realistic optimist who likes to consider various factors.

Some of my worries:
~At 27, I won't have the same mental quickness as someone who is 24 (average age of matriculant).
~I won't have the physical stamina.
~I will be a pregnant resident (31-34/35) if I choose to have kids.

I am using a relatively rigorous MCAT cut off in order to critically gauge my capabilities. Also, despite doubts about my age, I am 100% committed to take the exam in August.

Please share your stories and/or take the poll!

Many thanks!
im older than you lol. İm not sure what kind of answers you expect from a bunch of young minds, the real question is, do YOU think you are too old for this?I'm assuming you are not trolling here...
 
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myMDdreams

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im older than you lol. İm not sure what kind of answers you expect from a bunch of young minds, the real question is, do YOU think you are too old for this?I'm assuming you are not trolling here...
no trolling at all. just taking different factors and perspectives into account. thank you!
 

twospadz

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no trolling at all. just taking different factors and perspectives into account. thank you!
27 is not young nor is it old for people starting medical education. Your in the middle. Or close to it.
 

f4reignbeauty

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Didn't read the thread.

I think the national average of matriculants is around 24-25, which is not that far from 27. Also, a large portion of my classmates are older, so if this is something you want to do, go for it!
 

banananut

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Started med school at 28. Got married and had a baby during medical school and about to start residency. 27 is definitely not too old. Not sure the type of career path your current job has, but I had to be willing to give up a lot of earning potential during training. Just something to keep in mind.
 
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FCMike11

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I hope not. I'll matriculate (if this cycle goes well) at the age of 27. For reference, I am married with two kids starting a second career.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using SDN mobile
 

Crayola227

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every year older you get the higher your risk of developing a random medical condition that crushes all your hopes and dreams
jus sayin
chop chop
 
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windowls

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Also graduated in 2013 and will be 27 if I hopefully get accepted during the 2017-2018 cycle.
Like you, I questioned myself and wondered if I should go through with the whole med-school thing. Also thought about the age to have kids, etc.
After talking to many friends and mentors, I realized it's about the mindset. Do you really want it? If yes, then do whatever it takes to make it happen. Not everything in life can be planned out- if you know that being a physician is what you want to do, then other things in life will fall into place while you are actively chasing your dream.
 

redferrari

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I need more fingers to count the amount of people older than you in my class.
 

Mr Roboto

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Hi!

I have some data for you:

ACADEMIC

Pre-med in undergrad, Psych degree (2009-2013) <- calling schools and checking whether pre-reqs expire

3.7 sci GPA, 3.8 non-sci GPA

I am taking the MCAT in August (took the old version in 2014 and received 29~ 8 PS, 10 BS, 11 V)
If I get a competitive MCAT score, I will apply in 2017.

PERSONAL

single female
no kids
no debts

I haven't applied yet because of fear/self-doubt/poor work ethic for the 2014 MCAT. I also live in NYC so I've been enjoying my post-graduate life a little too much.

Alas, I decided it's time to grow up and advance my career. I will take the MCAT this summer and I will decide whether I have what it takes to purse a career in medicine [514+ or go home].

I would appreciate some quick input about my age (I am currently 25). I know age is just a number but I am a realistic optimist who likes to consider various factors.

Some of my worries:
~At 27, I won't have the same mental quickness as someone who is 24 (average age of matriculant).
~I won't have the physical stamina.
~I will be a pregnant resident (31-34/35) if I choose to have kids.

I am using a relatively rigorous MCAT cut off in order to critically gauge my capabilities. Also, despite doubts about my age, I am 100% committed to take the exam in August.

Please share your stories and/or take the poll!

Many thanks!

I'm 27 and start school in one month. Definitely don't feel like I'm at a disadvantage against younger classmates who have "mental agility."

If you want it go for it, but you have to want it more than you want to breathe.
 

Brahnold Bloodaxe

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No. They're not.

Your post as a whole, and avatar, provide a shining example of the issue I brought up. Sorry you were #triggered.

It seems that you are the one who was triggered. PL198 was exactly right. Unless you were out there taking the world by storm between college and med school, which you probably weren't, the 23 year old M2s are in a better life position than you as a 30 year old M2. Life is finite and age is not just a number.

Tick tock.

PS this is not directed at the OP and her decision. I say go for it cause 27 is not too old.
 
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L

LoveBeingHuman:)

I don't see any mention of shadowing. That's your key. Informed decisions (usually) equal better decisions, especially if you're hesitant even without having done it.
 

binko

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These types of questions are so old. Even older than my elderly wizened ass.
 
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Azete

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It seems that you are the one who was triggered. PL198 was exactly right. Unless you were out there taking the world by storm between college and med school, which you probably weren't, the 23 year old M2s are in a better life position than you as a 30 year old M2. Life is finite and age is not just a number.

Tick tock.

PS this is not directed at the OP and her decision. I say go for it cause 27 is not too old.

This is omitting a lot of variables.

I started at 30, and sure, on a professional level, in medicine, I am an equal to my 23 year old classmates. But I'm also married with children, I own a house with no mortgage, I saved enough to pay for med school without loans, and I actually know how to talk to adults (some of the "professional" interactions I see are painful to say the least). I've also experienced success along with many failures, learned 2 additional languages, and developed a social network extending to the highest level in almost every industry.

Maybe there are some 30 year olds that started med school after bartending and getting high throughout their 20s; kudos to them for taking control of their lives. For me -- and really all of the older students in my class -- saying the 23 year old M2s are ahead of us in "life" is just straight up wrong from almost any perspective.
 
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leonardoson

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the worst part is the 30 year olds who think working some dead end job for 5 years means they know everything and the people who didn't are immature.

those 21-23 yr olds are in the same position as you, and almost 10 years younger. I think most would pick to be them instead of you.

there's plus and minuses to both but the non-trads have huge complexes in my experience.
as a 25 year old in undergrad right now, I whole-heartedly disagree with your inexperienced opinion. Working those dead-end jobs as you call them, teach you how to live in the world and support yourself. Staying in the confines of a structured environment limits that growth. Yes, the people that grew up in the real world during those years where you are finding yourself gives you a different perspective. It also teaches you to find and struggle with what you actually want to do. Instead of having some delusion of grandeur with wanting to be a doctor and saving the world, a lot of us have felt the unfulfilled parts of ourselves working those jobs, which has lead us to the decision of doing something more important with our lives.
 
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Brahnold Bloodaxe

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This is omitting a lot of variables.

I started at 30, and sure, on a professional level, in medicine, I am an equal to my 23 year old classmates. But I'm also married with children, I own a house with no mortgage, I saved enough to pay for med school without loans, and I actually know how to talk to adults (some of the "professional" interactions I see are painful to say the least). I've also experienced success along with many failures, learned 2 additional languages, and developed a social network extending to the highest level in almost every industry.

Maybe there are some 30 year olds that started med school after bartending and getting high throughout their 20s; kudos to them for taking control of their lives. For me -- and really all of the older students in my class -- saying the 23 year old M2s are ahead of us in "life" is just straight up wrong from almost any perspective.


Good for you. Your anecdote is precisely why I included the "unless you were out there taking the world by storm" clause in my condemnation, so it doesn't apply to you and I'm not sure why you think we're in disagreement.

If you managed to earn enough money in the 8 years between graduating college and matriculating med school to pay off a house and save enough to cover 4 years of tuition and living expenses for medical school, all the while learning 2 languages and making connections at the highest level in all industries, you are extremely atypical. Most older med students are not in your position. You said your older peers in med school are similar to you so maybe you're at Harvard or something, but it's not the norm overall.
 

Taddy Mason

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Good for you. Your anecdote is precisely why I included the "unless you were out there taking the world by storm" clause in my condemnation, so it doesn't apply to you and I'm not sure why you think we're in disagreement.

If you managed to earn enough money in the 8 years between graduating college and matriculating med school to pay off a house and save enough to cover 4 years of tuition and living expenses for medical school, all the while learning 2 languages and making connections at the highest level in all industries, you are extremely atypical. Most older med students are not in your position. You said your older peers in med school are similar to you so maybe you're at Harvard or something, but it's not the norm overall.
It's not just about money; life experiences and maturity go a LONG way, and aren't something you can put a price on...
I go to a "lowly" state school and that has been what I've observed in my class (with the exception of one classmate...), the classes above me, the class below me, and in what I've heard from friends who are now residents - it's not just some anomaly limited to "top" schools.
 
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mcloaf

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This is omitting a lot of variables.

I started at 30, and sure, on a professional level, in medicine, I am an equal to my 23 year old classmates. But I'm also married with children, I own a house with no mortgage, I saved enough to pay for med school without loans, and I actually know how to talk to adults (some of the "professional" interactions I see are painful to say the least). I've also experienced success along with many failures, learned 2 additional languages, and developed a social network extending to the highest level in almost every industry.

Maybe there are some 30 year olds that started med school after bartending and getting high throughout their 20s; kudos to them for taking control of their lives. For me -- and really all of the older students in my class -- saying the 23 year old M2s are ahead of us in "life" is just straight up wrong from almost any perspective.

I don't disagree with the value of non-trads, but the bolded is a little over the top.

Then again I took some time off before med school and now I'm typing this from the Wifi on Bill Gates' jet on our way to golf with Warren Buffett and David Geffen so maybe there is something to what you're saying.
 
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PL198

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as a 25 year old in undergrad right now, I whole-heartedly disagree with your inexperienced opinion. Working those dead-end jobs as you call them, teach you how to live in the world and support yourself. Staying in the confines of a structured environment limits that growth. Yes, the people that grew up in the real world during those years where you are finding yourself gives you a different perspective. It also teaches you to find and struggle with what you actually want to do. Instead of having some delusion of grandeur with wanting to be a doctor and saving the world, a lot of us have felt the unfulfilled parts of ourselves working those jobs, which has lead us to the decision of doing something more important with our lives.

I specifically wrote they both have pluses and minuses. however the overwhelming feeling I get from non-trads is a superiority complex.
 

osckey

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i'm 12, what's a doctor?
 

Doctor-S

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I would appreciate some quick input about my age (I am currently 25). I know age is just a number but I am a realistic optimist who likes to consider various factors.

Please share your stories and/or take the poll!

Many thanks!

No, it is not too old.

I am aware of many students who are considerably older than 27 yo who are in medical school. Some of them were lawyers, veterinarians, airline pilots, etc., in their pre-medical school lives. Some of them were "grandparents" (see link below about 44-yo grandmother who graduated from Yale School of Medicine).

http://yalemedicine.yale.edu/autumn2007/news/followup/52989/

Thank you.
 
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