7

781639

Hi everyone. I've recently decided to change my long term plans and have decided that nursing is a good fit for me, with CRNA certification being a further goal.

My questions:
- After getting my bachelors degree, I plan on enrolling in an accelerated BSN program. What does this provide me in terms of coursework?
- I understand that most CRNA schools require gen chem, ochem, and biochem as prerequisites. Should I take these in undergrad? I initially changed my degree from biology to psych because chemistry just never clicked with me despite my best efforts. I'm not confident that I'd do well in these courses if I took them soon. Will accelerated BSN programs offer these courses?

In summary, when should I take ochem and biochem, during undergrad or later? Thank you!
 
OP
7

762513

Hi everyone. I've recently decided to change my long term plans and have decided that nursing is a good fit for me, with CRNA certification being a further goal.

My questions:
- After getting my bachelors degree, I plan on enrolling in an accelerated BSN program. What does this provide me in terms of coursework?
- I understand that most CRNA schools require gen chem, ochem, and biochem as prerequisites. Should I take these in undergrad? I initially changed my degree from biology to psych because chemistry just never clicked with me despite my best efforts. I'm not confident that I'd do well in these courses if I took them soon. Will accelerated BSN programs offer these courses?

In summary, when should I take ochem and biochem, during undergrad or later? Thank you!
I don't know you well enough to suggest when you should take your sciences. My only suggestion is when you feel you would be most successful.

If your dream and passion is CRNA, and that dream is based on all the right reasons, I would suggest after your bachelors you pursue a direct entry masters. It will get you a little bit closer to CRNA.

Good luck to you.
 
OP
7

781639

I don't know you well enough to suggest when you should take your sciences. My only suggestion is when you feel you would be most successful.

If your dream and passion is CRNA, and that dream is based on all the right reasons, I would suggest after your bachelors you pursue a direct entry masters. It will get you a little bit closer to CRNA.

Good luck to you.
I thought a few years at an ICU was required before even applying for a masters.
 
OP
7

762513

I thought a few years at an ICU was required before even applying for a masters.
Research direct entry masters in nursing. The program is for people who already have a bachelors degree in a different area.
 
OP
7

781639

I had no idea this existed, thank you! Though it looks like there aren't any schools in California that provide this..
 
OP
7

762513

I had no idea this existed, thank you! Though it looks like there aren't any schools in California that provide this..
Keep searching. You might get lucky.

Might I suggest allnurses.com as a resource as well.
 
OP
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762513

I've been there, but haven't posted yet. I've seen some pretty negative stuff regarding that site on here though.
This site, I feel, has more educated people on it. However, there are a lot of very, very disrespectful people on this forum in particular.

I wish you luck, keep searching until you find the right fit for you.
 

NYCGuy86

7+ Year Member
Aug 12, 2010
177
43
New York City
Status
Non-Student
I thought a few years at an ICU was required before even applying for a masters.
For CRNA, you are required to have at least one year of RN experience in an ICU (some schools prefer SICU or CTICU, many don't have a preference). If you complete a direct entry program, after completing the BSN/undergraduate nursing program, you'll have to leave for the year of ICU experience, then return for the masters CRNA program.
 
OP
7

781639

For CRNA, you are required to have at least one year of RN experience in an ICU (some schools prefer SICU or CTICU, many don't have a preference). If you complete a direct entry program, after completing the BSN/undergraduate nursing program, you'll have to leave for the year of ICU experience, then return for the masters CRNA program.
It doesn't sound like it's any faster than the traditional path.
 

NYCGuy86

7+ Year Member
Aug 12, 2010
177
43
New York City
Status
Non-Student
It doesn't sound like it's any faster than the traditional path.
The direct entry option is only "faster" for programs that do not require RN experience prior to beginning the graduate program. Typically, this will be the FNP programs. Many Acute Care NP programs require a year of acute care/critical care experience, while CRNA programs require a year of critical care experience. The only advantage would be that if you are admitted to a direct entry program, you'd be guaranteed a spot in the MSN CRNA program after your year critical care experience. In contrast, if you only complete the accelerated BSN program, you'd still have to apply to CRNA programs and wait for acceptances.
 
OP
7

762513

The direct entry option is only "faster" for programs that do not require RN experience prior to beginning the graduate program. Typically, this will be the FNP programs. Many Acute Care NP programs require a year of acute care/critical care experience, while CRNA programs require a year of critical care experience. The only advantage would be that if you are admitted to a direct entry program, you'd be guaranteed a spot in the MSN CRNA program after your year critical care experience. In contrast, if you only complete the accelerated BSN program, you'd still have to apply to CRNA programs and wait for acceptances.
Most of the direct entry nursing students work 1.5 years during the second half of the program. I believe CRNA is now DNP, although don't quote me for all programs.

Direct entry would probably save you a year.