May 27, 2019
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Hello, I am a Canadian citizen completing my undergraduate degree this year in Canada and subsequently starting my post-bacc in Canada next year but I received my green card in 2018. Is there a requirement to live in a certain state for a certain amount of time prior to applying or to complete some schooling in America?
 
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Since you’re a GC holder, you’re pretty much seen as equivalent to a US citizen in the eyes of admissions.

The most important thing in terms of living in the US is state residency, and that involves a bunch of stuff like 1 year continued residence, state DL/ID, state taxes, gainful employment and/or parents’ state residency if you’re a dependent, so make sure you look into your state’s residence requirements.
 
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KnightDoc

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Since you’re a GC holder, you’re pretty much seen as equivalent to a US citizen in the eyes of admissions.

The most important thing in terms of living in the US is state residency, and that involves a bunch of stuff like 1 year continued residence, state DL/ID, state taxes, gainful employment and/or parents’ state residency if you’re a dependent, so make sure you look into your state’s residence requirements.
There also might be issues regarding actually being in the US, as opposed to physically being in Canada for X number of years after obtaining the GC. OP would probably be better served consulting with an immigration lawyer, or the schools themselves, rather than a bunch of anonymous premeds on the internet! JMHO. :cool:
 
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There also might be issues regarding actually being in the US, as opposed to physically being in Canada for X number of years after obtaining the GC. OP would probably be better served consulting with an immigration lawyer, or the schools themselves, rather than a bunch of anonymous premeds on the internet! JMHO. :cool:

I just recently went through the GC process myself, and AFAIK, continued presence for X number of years has to do with applying for citizenship later. You can't get the GC without having been in present in the US for 5 years, so OP probably doesn't need to worry about that.

Of course, IANAL. Talk to an immigration attorney to be sure.
 
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group_theory

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Definitely talk with a US Immigration Attorney. Prolong absence from the US can be viewed by USCIS as abandonment. Studying abroad should be a valid excuse, but there are steps you need to take to show proof that you don't intent on abandoning your US residency (like getting a Re-Entry Permit, or a SB-1 visa, etc). Depends on how long you've been out of the country, and there are a lot of nuances (hence why you need to consult with a US Immigration attorney)

As to your original question - Medical Schools in the US will treat US Citizens and US Permanent Residents as the same, with no additional requirement to be physically located in the US. Only exception is USUHS which requires citizenship at time of matriculation.


As for why you might need to consult an immigration attorney

Here's some direct quotes from the US Embassy (Canada)

U.S. law holds that a resident alien (Green Card holder) MAY NOT stay outside the U.S. for the period of one year without losing his/her legal permanent resident status.
Exception is made for those who obtain a reentry permit from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) before departing the United States. Reentry Permit holders can remain outside of the United States for up to two (2) years from the date the permit is issued. Please consult USCIS for more information (1.2MB PDF) on applying for a reentry permit.
Returning Resident Visas Green card holders who have been out of the United States for more than one year and wish to return to the United States to reside there may be eligible for a new immigrant visa, known as Returning Resident Visa. You must prove you remained outside the U.S. for reasons beyond your control.

And from the US Embassy in Japan
All other immigrants who hold permanent resident status and reside outside of the United States for more than 12 months without prior approval from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) must obtain a new immigrant visa to return to the United States. Prior approval from USCIS consists of a re-entry permit which can only be applied for in the United States. The holder of a USCIS re-entry permit may remain outside of the United States during validity period of re-entry permit normally up to 24 months. For more details on applying for a reentry permit please visit the USCIS website.
A former immigrant who has lost permanent resident status and desires to return to the United States as an immigrant must obtain a new immigrant visa based on either an approved immigrant petition or returning resident status. A U.S. relative (spouse, parent, offspring or sibling) or U.S. employer may file an immigrant petition on behalf of the former immigrant in the normal manner. Information on the various types of immigrant and employment based petitions are contained elsewhere in this website.
The second way is for the immigrant to apply for returning resident status. An application for returning resident status requires evidence of the applicant’s continuing, unbroken ties to the United States, that the stay outside the United States was truly beyond the applicant’s control and that the intent of the applicant was to always return to the United States. Evidence may consist of continuous compliance with U.S. tax law, ownership of property and assets in the United States and maintenance of U.S. licenses and memberships. Having U.S. relatives, attending school overseas or stating an intent to return is generally insufficient.
 
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