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How long is part I of the board

Discussion in 'Podiatry Students' started by SAFOOT, Apr 23, 2007.

  1. SAFOOT

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    Newbie here, I checked out the test online for the board exam part I is it only 60 questions multiple choice?
     
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  3. Feli

    Feli ACFAS Member

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    That 60 question one is just an OLD (and easy) practice test they give you to show you the basic format.

    The real NBPME part I is currently 150 multiple choice questions (4 possible answers each), and you are allowed 3 hours to complete the exam.
    (http://www.nbpme.org/PDFs/Bulletin2007final.pdf ... page 4, right column)

    Breakdown is 10% general anat (gross, histo, neuro), 20% LEA, 15% physio, 10% biochem, 15% path, 15% pharm, 15% micro/immuno. (see pages 12-15 in that link).
     
  4. SAFOOT

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    great thanks
     
  5. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest

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    It took me about an hour but we still took that paper version last year. You guys get the computer.

    From my understanding the test may be more than or less than 150 questions depending on how you are doing. If you answer the first 120 right, the computer can turn off b/c you already passed; or if you miss the first 120, it will shut off b/c you cannot pass. And if you are marginal, the test may give you extra questions (beyond 150) to see if you pass or not. So the number is no longer as important.

    Remember the test is pass/fail so they don't care how many questions it takes to acess a student.
     
  6. SAFOOT

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    how would you rate the diffuculty of that test? How much do people generally study for it?
     
  7. PharmD/DPM

    PharmD/DPM PGY-2

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    I heard that it's the hardest out of all 3 parts, just because you don't really know how to take it. I studied 2 months for it. The 1st month was only about 10 hrs a week (40 hrs), then the month before I doubled up to 20hrs/wk to about 80hrs to a total of 120hrs. Now, I don't have a picture memory, I need repetition. Some people studied a month and did just fine, it's all about you. Parts II and III are easier to take, because there more clinical, so we use much of the info in our 3rd and 4th years on rotations/clinic. My SCPM class had a 95% pass rate last year, so if you're from Scholl, you'll most likely pass without difficulties.
     
  8. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest

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    I agree with the spirit of this post. How much should you study? It is very dependent on the person. I studied for a month and felt I over studied. I probably could have taken the test cold turkey (though I would never ever suggest or would have tried this).

    It is about being comfortable with your knowledge. You'll be fine. Use the practice tests to find you weaker areas and study those areas harder a little harder. Always start and end on lower limb, it is the largest and easiest part of the exam.
     
  9. bdaddyjolley

    bdaddyjolley ACFAS Member

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    My friend in school who took it this last time said it wasn't that bad if you're prepared. He just studied the UMSLE book with his LEA notes. Remember the boy scout motto, "Be Prepared".
     
  10. sachiejones

    sachiejones ACFAS Member

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    How similar are these board exams compared to boards taken by allopathic and osteopathic students?
     
  11. Feli

    Feli ACFAS Member

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    I hate to say it (and I haven't taken it yet), but from studying USMLE prep books/websites/practice exams to prep for my NBPME in July, I don't think the NBPME pt1 will be anywhere near the difficulty of the USMLE step 1. I have no idea what COMPLEX is like.

    USMLE has mostly 5+ answer choices (some questions have A-J!) while all NBPME just have 4 anwser choices (A-D). That may seem like a subtle difference, but I think big part of being a strong test taker for MC exams is eliminating bad answers. It's not hard to see that on NBPME, even answering all "A" on unknown questions could score around 25% while it would score much lower on USMLE.

    Also, USMLE and COMPLEX are numerically scored, unlike NBPME, which is pass/fail. I'm probably in the minority (and may catch hell for stating this), but I think a more difficult and numerically scored board exam is needed in podiatry to further the argument for parity with MD/DO...

    Also, being able to take NBPME pt2 without passing pt1 (USMLE allows that for purposes of FMGs, but I see no reason for it on NBPME) or being able to graduate and earn a DPM degree without passing pt1 is questionable. That is an embarassment to the podiatric profession if you ask me.

    Hopefully no NBPME reps won't read this and auto-fail me :D
     
  12. jonwill

    jonwill Podiatrist
    Podiatrist Moderator Emeritus

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    I completely agree with you. This needs to stop. This is basically setting someone up for failure and is extremely unethical.
     
  13. Feli

    Feli ACFAS Member

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    The legend that is Feelgood grows bigger by the minute :laugh:
     
  14. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest

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    You'll understand so enough. If you are a good student, the information is not tough.

    I was stressed as heck though.
     
  15. Catayst

    Catayst Hardest working man in toe business

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    How do they get away with charging $900 for a 150 MC test? Scantrons are like 10 cents.
     
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  17. Feli

    Feli ACFAS Member

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    It's computer-based now. That's not what you are paying for, though. The actual test materials, facilities, and test proctors might only cost about $50 per student, but the bulk of the test fee is for test development and review. The time of PhDs, DPMs, MDs/DOs, statisticians, etc who develop and review the exam is not cheap. Those annual costs must be divided equally among all students taking NBPME, and that volume is not very big (maybe about 3-400 students in July and 1-200 in Oct?).

    FWIW, the USMLE is $700. It has more questions and more versions, but they also have 20-40 times more student examinees to divide test development and review costs among.
     

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