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So I've been noticing that I've been living mainly on ramen noodles for most of the last week or so...The particular kind of instant noodle I'm eating right now included a packet of sesame oil and a block of dehydrated egg (yeah, I know) with the requisite powdered stock and noodle cake. :barf:

I've lost weight during med school so far because I find meals are a waste of time when I could be sleeping or studying. Often, I settle for fruit I have stashed in my room, a dinky little sandwich from the local 7-11, a bag of chips, or the aforementioned ramen. And I can't be alone in this.

So what are your favorite junk foods in med school? (Or, if you don't eat junk and manage to stay healthy, then what do you eat? How do you find time to prepare it? etc.)
:spam: :spam: :spam:
 

MossPoh

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I've had the added challenge of trying to maintain enough clean calories to keep seeing gains in the gym. It isn't that hard. It can get expensive though. Rather than eating ramen or snack cakes or whatever else, I'll make a sandwich with whole grain bread, natural peanut butter and a banana, or I'll munch on some whole grain granola with almonds and what not in it. If I have the craving for something sweet then I might grab a cliff bar. It is a reasonable compromise for me. I also have lots of cottage cheese, fresh fruits, etc. A crock pot is good too. You can just toss a bunch of stuff in there and go do your thang for a bit and come back to a meal that is ready.

My biggest problem has been keeping my caffeine (coffee) consumption in check. It is too easy for me to pound 7+ cups without even realizing it till I'm sitting twitching and sweating.
 

Excelsius

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So I've been noticing that I've been living mainly on ramen noodles for most of the last week or so...The particular kind of instant noodle I'm eating right now included a packet of sesame oil and a block of dehydrated egg (yeah, I know) with the requisite powdered stock and noodle cake. :barf:

I've lost weight during med school so far because I find meals are a waste of time when I could be sleeping or studying. Often, I settle for fruit I have stashed in my room, a dinky little sandwich from the local 7-11, a bag of chips, or the aforementioned ramen. And I can't be alone in this.

So what are your favorite junk foods in med school? (Or, if you don't eat junk and manage to stay healthy, then what do you eat? How do you find time to prepare it? etc.)
:spam: :spam: :spam:
http://whatsonmyfood.org/index.jsp

I think that pesticides are the reason that most Americans are unhealthy and fat. We keep trying to justify healthier Europeans by coming up with nonsense like the French drinking a lot of wine, etc, but in fact it is the garbage that we eat. You get what you pay for. The options are to save money on food, eat hormones/pesticides, and later spend much more money on medical bills or pay a dollar or two extra for healthy (often organic) food and not have to worry about as many medical problems. As a future doctor, you ought to know this. Places like Trader Joe's are not that expensive and their foods are good, even if you get the non-organic stuff. If you really can't afford organic food, another option is to skips meat and go with vegetarian, half to full organic diet.
 

Excelsius

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Do you really? Could you suggest a mechanism whereby pesticides make you fat?
First, it would be better for you to be skeptical about the harmlessness of pesticides rather than vice versa. That's just logical.

Second, some pesticides are known or suspected endocrine disruptors. Endocrine disruption has been related to obesity. Quick example: Acephate is a likely endocrine disruptor present in beans, apples, cranberries, etc. It could be responsible for obesity. I don't need to go and do a detailed search to find a much better example simply because I know that no one knows for sure what are the full ramifications of pesticide ingestion and I think that's dangerous enough without having to look up evidence to prove that pesticides are actually making you fat (among a myriad of other - and more serious - illnesses like cancer). That's the wrong question to ask.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1931509
 

HereIComeSEALS

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America the only country to use pesticides???? New one to me. Plus do people really consume enough to get significant doses?
 

Excelsius

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America the only country to use pesticides???? New one to me. Plus do people really consume enough to get significant doses?
Did anyone say that? However, America does seem to be the only industrialized country where certain pesticides are still allowed to be in food and cosmetics while European and other governments have banned those pesticides in their products. It is thought that the lobbying power of agro-companies prevent the passage of stricter regulations.

The people working at FDA are apparently not good at this thing. A serving of broccoli likely doesn't have enough pesticides to affect you. But what about when you get those pesticides from 10 to 20 sources per day? Well, apparently FDA didn't take the additive effects into account. Oops! This is not really too surprising because the best and brightest don't usually work for the government.
 

facetguy

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Excelsius, I agree that we will continue to better understand the link between endocrine-disrupting chemicals in our environment and obesity (and health in general, for that matter). Unfortunately, this is one of those areas that medicine just doesn't do well with. We tend to wait until a person is sick, then intervene. The notion of prevention is usually kicked to the curb.
 

KeyzerSoze

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Did anyone say that? However, America does seem to be the only industrialized country where certain pesticides are still allowed to be in food and cosmetics while European and other governments have banned those pesticides in their products.
Really, the only industrialized country? Do you seriously think that China, Russia, India, most of the Middle East, etc, use less pesticide than the USA? Somehow I doubt it. For that matter, do you think that the USA uses more pesticides now than it did 50 years, when rates of obesity were far lower?

In any case, your statement that pesticides are "the reason that most Americans are unhealthy and fat" is very odd. First, most Americans are not unhealthy and fat. Second, the reason more Americans are unhealthy and fat are due to a combination of plentiful high caloric food and an unprecedented sedentary lifestyle. Do some pesticides act as endocrine disruptors? Possibly, although the compound studied in the article you cited was not a pesticide. I doubt anyone would have disagreed if you had merely said that pesticides and other environmental toxins may play some role in making some people unhealthy and fat.
 

Concubine

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So I've been noticing that I've been living mainly on ramen noodles for most of the last week or so...The particular kind of instant noodle I'm eating right now included a packet of sesame oil and a block of dehydrated egg (yeah, I know) with the requisite powdered stock and noodle cake. :barf:

I've lost weight during med school so far because I find meals are a waste of time when I could be sleeping or studying. Often, I settle for fruit I have stashed in my room, a dinky little sandwich from the local 7-11, a bag of chips, or the aforementioned ramen. And I can't be alone in this.

So what are your favorite junk foods in med school? (Or, if you don't eat junk and manage to stay healthy, then what do you eat? How do you find time to prepare it? etc.)
:spam: :spam: :spam:
My wife cooks for me, so I eat very well even during school even when I have no time. For example: Friday I had grilled salmon, tonight I've got enchiladas on the menu, and tomorrow some grilled BBQ ribs :). My advice? Find a woman (or man) that knows how to cook and it won't be a problem.
 

zenlike

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Two words: George Foreman
 

2008orbust

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My wife cooks healthy meals and packs healthy lunches for me, but I do admit grabbing junk food while taking study breaks.
 

Excelsius

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Excelsius, I agree that we will continue to better understand the link between endocrine-disrupting chemicals in our environment and obesity (and health in general, for that matter). Unfortunately, this is one of those areas that medicine just doesn't do well with. We tend to wait until a person is sick, then intervene. The notion of prevention is usually kicked to the curb.
And then doctors wonder why the government is forcing prevention down the throat of doctors.
 

Barfalamule

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A thoughtful rebuttal. Props.

Really, the only industrialized country? Do you seriously think that China, Russia, India, most of the Middle East, etc, use less pesticide than the USA? Somehow I doubt it. For that matter, do you think that the USA uses more pesticides now than it did 50 years, when rates of obesity were far lower?

In any case, your statement that pesticides are "the reason that most Americans are unhealthy and fat" is very odd. First, most Americans are not unhealthy and fat. Second, the reason more Americans are unhealthy and fat are due to a combination of plentiful high caloric food and an unprecedented sedentary lifestyle. Do some pesticides act as endocrine disruptors? Possibly, although the compound studied in the article you cited was not a pesticide. I doubt anyone would have disagreed if you had merely said that pesticides and other environmental toxins may play some role in making some people unhealthy and fat.
 

Excelsius

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Really, the only industrialized country? Do you seriously think that China, Russia, India, most of the Middle East, etc, use less pesticide than the USA? Somehow I doubt it. For that matter, do you think that the USA uses more pesticides now than it did 50 years, when rates of obesity were far lower?

In any case, your statement that pesticides are "the reason that most Americans are unhealthy and fat" is very odd. First, most Americans are not unhealthy and fat. Second, the reason more Americans are unhealthy and fat are due to a combination of plentiful high caloric food and an unprecedented sedentary lifestyle. Do some pesticides act as endocrine disruptors? Possibly, although the compound studied in the article you cited was not a pesticide. I doubt anyone would have disagreed if you had merely said that pesticides and other environmental toxins may play some role in making some people unhealthy and fat.
Just read some articles on line like this one: http://www.celsias.com/article/if-us-wont-ban-dangerous-pesticides-our-markets-it/:

"Atrazine, a cancer-causing chemical that it's banned in Europe, but so widely used in the United States that it's found in 71% of our drinking water. Or check out water-cooler facts such as: Apples can be sprayed up to 16 times with 26 different chemicals, just a few of the 400 pesticides that are legal in the U.S."

Look, I'm not an expert in pesticides and like I said, I don't have the urge to look up every little detail. If you do a quick search, you'll find MANY pesticides that are banned in Europe and Canada but are legal in USA. This is not quantum chromodynamics. And just do a test: buy a bar of soap or a shampoo made in USA and compare to one made in Italy. Take a look at the back for list of ingredients, look them up, and then you'll get an idea that even a random sample like this yields results that show US products have more chemicals in them. And countries like China or some places in Middle East are still developing. I am more talking about places like Europe, Canada, Australia, etc. In China the air alone is probably toxic enough to make it number one priority before everything else. Their poisons affect us here in USA and Japan.

I agree that sedentary lifestyle is also a contributor. But we can go down the list ad infinitum and add many more factors like stress, lack of nutritional value, etc. I don't think there is any one thing that will be exclusively responsible for overall poor health, but I think that pesticides are at least a major contributor. And isn't it also interesting that high calorie diet is also usually the one that contains most chemicals? You would have to separate these two before you can ascertain that calories are significant contributors. Americans couldn't be eating that many more calories than they do in Europe.
 

Barfalamule

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You posted a dead link Excelsius but I'm going to throw up a link that might help out a bit:
http://www.news-medical.net/news/2007/02/18/21958.aspx

That article is a couple of years old. The research is marching along slowly as good science should. I personally think the major contribution to obesity is bad parenting and lack of responsibility.

To go from pesticides may be a contributor to pesticides are a major contributor is a reach and the science is not there yet.
 

facetguy

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I had posted this in another forum several months ago, and it fits into the endocrine disruptor idea:

It's not about our genes suddenly changing. It's about the interplay between our ancient genes and our modern environmental exposures, be they our horrible diet or our exposure to all sorts of chemicals. Studies have already shown that chemicals that are everywhere today can act as endocrine disruptors. A good example appears to be bisphenol-A, or BPA. People with higher urinary BPA levels have more medical disorders (Lang IA, JAMA 17 Sept 2008;300:1303-10). BPA at normal exposure levels disrupts insulin sensitivity and thus promotes diabetes (Hugo ER. Environ Health Perspectives, Dec 2008;116:1642-47). Obese people are much more likely to suffer insulin resistance if they have high fat levels of organo-pollutants (Lee DH. Diabetes Care, March 2007;30:622-28). The list goes on and on.

The Environmental Obesogen Hypothesis: inappropriate receptor activation by organotins will lead directly to adipocyte differentiation and a predisposition to obesity and/or will sensitize exposed individuals to obesity and related metabolic disorders under the influence of the typical high calorie, high fat Western diet. (Grun F et al. Endocrinology 2006 June;147:S50-55)

What's worse is that we may unknowingly be setting our children up for problems in their future. What began as the Barker 'fetal origins' hypothesis has now evolved into what has been called 'Developmental Origins of Adult Health and Disease', which says that exposure to an unfavorable environment during development (either in utero or in the early postnatal period) programs changes in fetal or neonatal development such that the individual is then at greater risk of developing adulthood disease. Meaning these kids are facing an uphill battle with things like obesity right from the start! As one author puts it, "perturbed nuclear receptor signaling can alter adipocyte proliferation, differentiation or modulate systemic homeostatic controls, leading to long-term consequences that may be magnified if disruption occurs during sensitive periods during fetal or early childhood development". (Grun F. Rev Endocr Metab Disord 2007 Jun;8:161-171)

The emerging study of epigenetics has already shown that, for example, providing adequate methylation factors (folate, B12, B6) to pregnant Agouti mice markedly and immediately (that very next generation, not 1000s of years of genetic evolution) reduces obesity, diabetes and cancer in their offspring (which were thought to be genetically destined to suffer these disorders).

Yes, personal responsibility is important. But we have to get beyond the simple notion that obesity is solely due to laziness or moral inferiority.
 

Barfalamule

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I don't think anyone has said this.

But we have to get beyond the simple notion that obesity is solely due to laziness or moral inferiority.
 

Flaxmoore

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Cooking is one of my study therapies. Taking a half-hour here and there to work up a nice dinner, or laying a nice loaf of homemade sourdough on the table, is my therapy. The amount of processed food in my kitchen is tiny- mostly protein bars. Everything else, down to the sausage, is either in its natural state or minimally processed.
 

searun

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Cooking is one of my study therapies. Taking a half-hour here and there to work up a nice dinner, or laying a nice loaf of homemade sourdough on the table, is my therapy. The amount of processed food in my kitchen is tiny- mostly protein bars. Everything else, down to the sausage, is either in its natural state or minimally processed.
Wow, you eat sausage?
 
OP
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Just read some articles on line like this one: http://www.celsias.com/article/if-us-wont-ban-dangerous-pesticides-our-markets-it/:

"Atrazine, a cancer-causing chemical that it’s banned in Europe, but so widely used in the United States that it’s found in 71% of our drinking water. Or check out water-cooler facts such as: Apples can be sprayed up to 16 times with 26 different chemicals, just a few of the 400 pesticides that are legal in the U.S."

Look, I'm not an expert in pesticides and like I said, I don't have the urge to look up every little detail. If you do a quick search, you'll find MANY pesticides that are banned in Europe and Canada but are legal in USA. This is not quantum chromodynamics. And just do a test: buy a bar of soap or a shampoo made in USA and compare to one made in Italy. Take a look at the back for list of ingredients, look them up, and then you'll get an idea that even a random sample like this yields results that show US products have more chemicals in them. And countries like China or some places in Middle East are still developing. I am more talking about places like Europe, Canada, Australia, etc. In China the air alone is probably toxic enough to make it number one priority before everything else. Their poisons affect us here in USA and Japan.

I agree that sedentary lifestyle is also a contributor. But we can go down the list ad infinitum and add many more factors like stress, lack of nutritional value, etc. I don't think there is any one thing that will be exclusively responsible for overall poor health, but I think that pesticides are at least a major contributor. And isn't it also interesting that high calorie diet is also usually the one that contains most chemicals? You would have to separate these two before you can ascertain that calories are significant contributors. Americans couldn't be eating that many more calories than they do in Europe.
That's a good point. I think we should probably be paying more attention to the phenomenon of pesticides and industrial chemicals as they affect our health overall, not just obesity (Incidentally, if you look at it from that point of view, it makes sense that obesity rates climb simultaneously with industrialization). As to the person contesting that the U.S. used more pesticides in the 50's... the stuff doesn't go away, it's probably still out there, and by now, it's had time to accumulate in the environment and make its way to the descendants of the guys whose bright idea it was to use those hazardous chemicals in the first place. At least, that's one possible explanation.

Here in Korea, for example, the latest health issue is hormones that leak into food from plastic containers, and also sulfates and parabens in cosmetics and hygiene products. I think they do a very good job here of taking prevention measures when it comes to public health... not as well as Europe maybe, but certainly better than the U.S. It's not what the government does so much as the fact that the society is very homogenous (hence, easier to get people to follow directions) and that almost everyone takes a strong interest in health issues.
 
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Ramen takes a little time to cook (though not as long as pasta, especially if you're making your own sauce) but instant ramen is a different creature entirely. Just add hot water, literally: unfortunately, you get sick on the stuff. I'm honestly better off with the 7-11 sandwiches, I think.

Good cooking is a sort of therapy, that's true (as long as you have someone else to do the dishes, that is :laugh:). I ordered Serve It Forth by M.F.K. Fisher to read over the summer break and I'm really looking forward to it.

But as for me, I'm in the dorms and I don't have access to cooking facilities (the rule is, you're not allowed to have heating devices in the rooms... not even coffee machines, but I suppose there's no reason I couldn't smuggle one in). They do have a cafeteria here, and I shouldn't be skipping meals, but I often don;t want to leave my room to go down to eat. I've started becoming more diligent about meals though, and I've been feeling better (and I'm waiting for that weight I lost to come piling back on...... I need to exercise, period... I used to fence but that's hard to do here, so I'm thinking of taking up kendo... running on a treadmill is so boring that I'm having trouble sticking with it... plus being able to hit things with bamboo swords may help to relieve stress accumulated throughout the day).
:beat:)

I may be living with my mother next year, and then I will certainly eat better, since no one I know cooks as well as my mother does.
 

facetguy

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I just got a George Foreman after doing undergrad without one. I always just went the sandwich/cereal route, but now I think I'll do the chicken breast/turkey dog/salad route.

Anyone have any good foreman recipes to share?
 

pntgrd

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http://whatsonmyfood.org/index.jsp

I think that pesticides are the reason that most Americans are unhealthy and fat. We keep trying to justify healthier Europeans by coming up with nonsense like the French drinking a lot of wine, etc, but in fact it is the garbage that we eat. You get what you pay for. The options are to save money on food, eat hormones/pesticides, and later spend much more money on medical bills or pay a dollar or two extra for healthy (often organic) food and not have to worry about as many medical problems. As a future doctor, you ought to know this. Places like Trader Joe's are not that expensive and their foods are good, even if you get the non-organic stuff. If you really can't afford organic food, another option is to skips meat and go with vegetarian, half to full organic diet.
Those pesticides sure have a lot of calories! :rolleyes:
 

Jolie South

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I just got a George Foreman after doing undergrad without one. I always just went the sandwich/cereal route, but now I think I'll do the chicken breast/turkey dog/salad route.

Anyone have any good foreman recipes to share?
I skewered some shrimp, threw Zatarain's creole seasoning on them, and put them on the George Foreman. They came out perfectly cooked in no time. I then ate them with some rice.:thumbup:
 

Chemist0157

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I just got a George Foreman after doing undergrad without one. I always just went the sandwich/cereal route, but now I think I'll do the chicken breast/turkey dog/salad route.

Anyone have any good foreman recipes to share?
Quesadillas are pretty easy to make using the George Foreman. Tortillas, taco meat (or chicken), and shredded cheese is all you need. You can add anything you want, but make sure you cut things fairly small to keep the quesadillas from being lop-sided.
 

andie gustafson

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I avoid junk food because now I know its risks... I consider myself one of the healthiest.

I have four meals per day at specific hours and I respect it as a very important appointment. For example:

6-7 am fruit shake
10-12 breakfast (bread, meat or eggs or cheese, some cereal bar...)
1-2 snack (any fruit and any kind of cereal)
4:30-5:30 lunch (rice, beans, any soup, chicken or tuna or eggs or cheese... and some fruit and nuts)
8-10 dinner ( meat, bread, vegetables, box cereal with milk and a cup of tea)

On weekends or whenever I get to hang out with friends I respect my times and order anything I want.

I can choose anything the point is to respect my body needs, and that includes eating, I mean how am I going to be a good doctor if all I eat is crap that doesn't help my brain oxygenation and my body functions? how am I going to tell a diabetic to have good eating habits when I don't?

Think about it, I mean you just have to eat all the food groups and give an established time to do it.
 

maceo

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I avoid junk food because now I know its risks... I consider myself one of the healthiest.

I have four meals per day at specific hours and I respect it as a very important appointment. For example:

6-7 am fruit shake
10-12 breakfast (bread, meat or eggs or cheese, some cereal bar...)
1-2 snack (any fruit and any kind of cereal)
4:30-5:30 lunch (rice, beans, any soup, chicken or tuna or eggs or cheese... and some fruit and nuts)
8-10 dinner ( meat, bread, vegetables, box cereal with milk and a cup of tea)

On weekends or whenever I get to hang out with friends I respect my times and order anything I want.

I can choose anything the point is to respect my body needs, and that includes eating, I mean how am I going to be a good doctor if all I eat is crap that doesn't help my brain oxygenation and my body functions? how am I going to tell a diabetic to have good eating habits when I don't?

Think about it, I mean you just have to eat all the food groups and give an established time to do it.
that schedule looks good but how doyou manage to eat at the same time everyday. Thats almost impossible in medicine. i can tell you there is no way you will be able to keep that up in clincial medicine. You will be lucky if you get one meal per day and thats under rushed circumstances. But i agree with you it is almost essential for health to have a relaxed balanced un hurried meals at proper intervals to maintain health.
 

Zoom-Zoom

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I like ramen but try not to eat too much because of all the sodium.

I've been experimenting with several healthy home-cooked fast-food alternatives. My favorite is the $1 chicken meal..

Bag of frozen chicken breasts (7): $5.00
Bag of frozen mixed veggies: $1.50
Bag of whole wheat rice: $2.20
Bottle of fat free generic BBQ sauce: $1

It comes out to $1.07 for a hefty portion of BBQ Chicken, Veggies, and Rice. Add some sriracha sauce to spice things up mmmmm. I also make a $1 plate of "chicken parmeseana" (w/ out breading). Double mmmmm.
 

Excelsius

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I avoid junk food because now I know its risks... I consider myself one of the healthiest.

I have four meals per day at specific hours and I respect it as a very important appointment. For example:

6-7 am fruit shake
10-12 breakfast (bread, meat or eggs or cheese, some cereal bar...)
1-2 snack (any fruit and any kind of cereal)
4:30-5:30 lunch (rice, beans, any soup, chicken or tuna or eggs or cheese... and some fruit and nuts)
8-10 dinner ( meat, bread, vegetables, box cereal with milk and a cup of tea)

On weekends or whenever I get to hang out with friends I respect my times and order anything I want.

I can choose anything the point is to respect my body needs, and that includes eating, I mean how am I going to be a good doctor if all I eat is crap that doesn't help my brain oxygenation and my body functions? how am I going to tell a diabetic to have good eating habits when I don't?

Think about it, I mean you just have to eat all the food groups and give an established time to do it.
I don't know how you do all that. During the week I only have time to eat once a day in the evening (maybe a fruit in the morning). I have been trying to find anything healthy I can eat in the format of the food tubes for astronauts so I could squeeze it in while I am driving or walking around. A friend suggested to buy some foods used in the military - these are some sort of food-bars. But I wasn't sure they were healthy and they sure were pretty expensive. If anyone knows of any healthy snacks that you can have lying around without going bad and are healthy, please share. I haven't been able to find anything.

We really need human dry food, much like the dog food. I find it surprising that no one has invented human dry food company. So many professionals and students would benefit from it. I mean imagine if your entire meal for the day could be in the form of kibbles in your pocket. Not too tasty perhaps, but the goal here is health and efficiency. One time I seriously considered buying human grade food made for dogs but never really pursued it. We eat food to survive, mainly. These days we have really steered away from this concept and turned food into recreation. The dry food might not be a hot seller among women because they usually really savor their food, but guys don't really care that much about what they eat. I don't either, as long as it doesn't make me sick later on. So I think dry food would be a pretty hot seller among guys (and maybe female medstudents).
 

KeyzerSoze

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We really need human dry food, much like the dog food. I find it surprising that no one has invented human dry food company. So many professionals and students would benefit from it. I mean imagine if your entire meal for the day could be in the form of kibbles in your pocket. Not too tasty perhaps, but the goal here is health and efficiency. One time I seriously considered buying human grade food made for dogs but never really pursued it. We eat food to survive, mainly. These days we have really steered away from this concept and turned food into recreation. The dry food might not be a hot seller among women because they usually really savor their food, but guys don't really care that much about what they eat. I don't either, as long as it doesn't make me sick later on. So I think dry food would be a pretty hot seller among guys (and maybe female medstudents).
Wow, this has got to be one of the most depressing things I've ever read on SDN.
 

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I'm a picky eater, to the point that I'll skip a meal or 3 if I don't have the time/inclination/money to eat something I find appetizing. It's not uncommon for me to go 24+ hours without eating, capped by a ginormous bingefest of gluttony. I know one is supposed to keep to a regular eating schedule, but I like to keep my body on it's toes and guessing.

Of course, this doesn't mean I always eat appetizing things, just that the deliciousness of the food is inversely proportional to the time since my last meal. Snack Ramen is probably at the 30 hour level, however.
 

facetguy

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I'm a picky eater, to the point that I'll skip a meal or 3 if I don't have the time/inclination/money to eat something I find appetizing. It's not uncommon for me to go 24+ hours without eating, capped by a ginormous bingefest of gluttony. I know one is supposed to keep to a regular eating schedule, but I like to keep my body on it's toes and guessing.

Of course, this doesn't mean I always eat appetizing things, just that the deliciousness of the food is inversely proportional to the time since my last meal. Snack Ramen is probably at the 30 hour level, however.
A sort of intermittent fasting, no?
 

Chemist0157

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Obesity rates do not include overweight people, as well as those who are still eating poorly. When obesity rates are equal to or higher than 30% in so many states, and it is 20-25% across the boards, it's not surprising that we can find enough other unhealthy people to bump it up to 51%.
 

Excelsius

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Wow, this has got to be one of the most depressing things I've ever read on SDN.
:confused: That's a pretty strong statement. Care to explain exactly which part is so depressing?
 

Excelsius

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Excelsius

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Friend, let me introduce you to the exciting world of breakfast cereals...
Except that you can't eat cereal while you're driving. Plus that only takes care of the breakfast and is not something you can always have around and make it. I have tried eating it without any milk though. That works, but acts more like a quick carbohydrate snack/dessert.
 

WellWornLad

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Except that you can't eat cereal while you're driving. Plus that only takes care of the breakfast and is not something you can always have around and make it.
Blasphemy. If I can eat cereal while riding my motorcycle, you sir have no excuse.

Emphasis on the "if." I'll try it tomorrow and let you know how it pans out. Of course, now that I think about it, I can't imagine how "dry human food" could possibly be easier to eat than cereal while driving anyway.
 

unsung

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Ok, so school hasn't started yet. But can it really be so different from college or working full-time? :p Cooking is fun! It's the grocery shopping & lugging said items home that would take more time, I imagine. (Not to mention $$$, if you want to buy good produce, or shop at the farmer's market, etc.)

As for what to cook, it's really easy and fast to sear ahi tuna with a bit of rice vinegar and throw it over some salad. I also like to eat a lot of pasta and doctor a bottle of sauce with fresh tomatoes, basil, and other veggies. I found a GREAT recipe for pizza dough on veganyumyum.com, and it's easy to make a large batch, then freeze portions for later use. When hungry, just take out a serving of dough, put some pizza sauce on it, fresh veggies/cheese/whatever toppings you like, and voila best pizza eva.

It's always worth it to cook, imo. Not that difficult to cook tasty, healthy fare either, as long as you find cooking fun.

Oh, forgot to mention, I also like to cook a lot of soups, big pots of chowder, chili, etc. As well as curries (great antioxidants), stir fries. Basically, I tend to make a lot of "throw everything in one pot" type meals, which taste good and are also healthy and easy. It also helps to do the cooking on a weekend and refrigerate portions for easy reheating during the week.
 
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Excelsius

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Blasphemy. If I can eat cereal while riding my motorcycle, you sir have no excuse.

Emphasis on the "if." I'll try it tomorrow and let you know how it pans out. Of course, now that I think about it, I can't imagine how "dry human food" could possibly be easier to eat than cereal while driving anyway.
You must be quite a daredevil. Riding your bike in the carpool lane, holding the cereal bowl with one hand, the spoon with the other, and trying to muster all your cerebellar power to guide the spoon through your helmet into your mouth without spilling any of the milk into your eyes, nostrils, and ears. Well, actually they would be more like hitting you in the face at over 65mph!


Ok, so let me know how it goes. If you manage to do it, I will need some photographic evidence. And your entrance into the Guinness hall of fame will be automatic. Do you think you can put it as an EC on your pre-residency resume? Hahahaha.
 

KeyzerSoze

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You must be quite a daredevil. Riding your bike in the carpool lane, holding the cereal bowl with one hand, the spoon with the other, and trying to muster all your cerebellar power to guide the spoon through your helmet into your mouth without spilling any of the milk into your eyes, nostrils, and ears. Well, actually they would be more like hitting you in the face at over 65mph!


Ok, so let me know how it goes. If you manage to do it, I will need some photographic evidence. And your entrance into the Guinness hall of fame will be automatic. Do you think you can put it as an EC on your pre-residency resume? Hahahaha.
What milk?