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Non-US Citizen: Try to match as IMG or try to get into a US/Can school?

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futuregirlmed

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Hi everyone, I hope I'm posting this in the right place? If not, I apologize.
I'm a non-us citizen currently studying in Europe, I should probably point out that I'm also a non-EU citizen. I really want to be a doctor, I can't imagine doing anything else. Should I:

-Go to a European med school such as the ones in Hungary, Poland and so on that are easier to get into then try to match into a US residency program? I'm well aware that the match rates are not very high and that me requiring a visa will pose some problems. And is it true that FMGs have to take all three steps before residency?
OR
-Do undergrad in the US and try to get into a US med school. I'm also aware that this is no easy feat but I am prepared to work my butt off for it. This route makes it easier when it comes to residency.

I'm really unsure of what to do because I'm wrapping up my secondary school studies soon and a decision needs to be made. Any help or advice is greatly appreciated.

Note:
I'm obviously not sure of the specialty I would like to pursue but right now, I'm interested in Emergency Medicine, Meds-Peds and Derm ('ve heard derm is practically impossible as an fmg).
 

Matthew9Thirtyfive

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Derm is practically impossible for most US grads, so you would be very unlikely to match as an FMG. Someone on this forum once said that you should try your best to go to med school in the country you want to ultimately practice. If that’s the US, you should try to go to med school here if possible.
 
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futuregirlmed

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Derm is practically impossible for most US grads, so you would be very unlikely to match as an FMG. Someone on this forum once said that you should try your best to go to med school in the country you want to ultimately practice. If that’s the US, you should try to go to med school here if possible.
Yeah, I thought as much. Thanks for replying! :)
 

Batracho

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I agree with what was said above regarding Derm, but I would add that if you are thinking about very competitive specialties, being at a US medical school is very beneficial.

I am also a non-US citizen (2 year at a US medical school), and getting into a US medical school as a non citizen is hard, both from academic and financial standpoint. But so is matching as an IMG. There are many factors that will impact what’s a better choice in your case, feel free to msg me if you wanna know more, I’m quite familiar with the process.
 

futuregirlmed

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I agree with what was said above regarding Derm, but I would add that if you are thinking about very competitive specialties, being at a US medical school is very beneficial.

I am also a non-US citizen (2 year at a US medical school), and getting into a US medical school as a non citizen is hard, both from academic and financial standpoint. But so is matching as an IMG. There are many factors that will impact what’s a better choice in your case, feel free to msg me if you wanna know more, I’m quite familiar with the process.
Thank you so much, will message you right now!
 

DameJulie

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I have a friend who was an international student and was not accepted this cycle. He had high stats and fairly good ECs, but was not interviewed at all. I was told that admission for non-US/Canadian citizens are generally more difficult
 

Batracho

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I have a friend who was an international student and was not accepted this cycle. He had high stats and fairly good ECs, but was not interviewed at all. I was told that admission for non-US/Canadian citizens are generally more difficult
What you were told is definitely true. The bar is much, much higher for us, and paying for medical school is even harder.
 

maplecookie

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Echoing the first responder to this thread, you should make sure that you want to permanently live and practice in the country that you will get your final accreditation in. Have you lived in the US and really want to live and practice here instead of the country you are a citizen in? I ask because there are so many things stacked up against you as a non-US citizen and the path to getting a green card and a citizenship is so so difficult (it took my family and I over a decade to get just the green card).
In terms of getting in undergrad/med school vs. residency, I can't really speak about the residency but I feel like the first would be better overall just in terms of having more time and exposure to the American medical system in addition to an easier time qualifying for opportunities. That being said, entering med school as a non-citizen (especially non Canadian) is very difficult. A lot of schools will not accept non-citizens/non-green card holders outright and the ones that do are very competitive with financial help severely limited.

I just realized you never said whether you had a green card in which case a lot of these concerns don't apply lol
 

futuregirlmed

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I have a friend who was an international student and was not accepted this cycle. He had high stats and fairly good ECs, but was not interviewed at all. I was told that admission for non-US/Canadian citizens are generally more difficult
Wow, I'm sorry about your friend. This is why I'm finding it so hard to make a decision. It's risky to try to get into a US med school as a foreigner but it's also risky to try to match as a foreigner. I'm not sure which is better?
 

futuregirlmed

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Echoing the first responder to this thread, you should make sure that you want to permanently live and practice in the country that you will get your final accreditation in. Have you lived in the US and really want to live and practice here instead of the country you are a citizen in? I ask because there are so many things stacked up against you as a non-US citizen and the path to getting a green card and a citizenship is so so difficult (it took my family and I over a decade to get just the green card).
In terms of getting in undergrad/med school vs. residency, I can't really speak about the residency but I feel like the first would be better overall just in terms of having more time and exposure to the American medical system in addition to an easier time qualifying for opportunities. That being said, entering med school as a non-citizen (especially non Canadian) is very difficult. A lot of schools will not accept non-citizens/non-green card holders outright and the ones that do are very competitive with financial help severely limited.

I just realized you never said whether you had a green card in which case a lot of these concerns don't apply lol
Thanks for responding. I don't have a green card to answer that question. So much to think about and decide on. Thanks again! :)
 

DameJulie

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Wow, I'm sorry about your friend. This is why I'm finding it so hard to make a decision. It's risky to try to get into a US med school as a foreigner but it's also risky to try to match as a foreigner. I'm not sure which is better?
For what's worth the international student came from a country with ORM ethnicity, so the competition is even more fierce.

Sorry I don't know the answer to your question. I would guess it's more risky to get into a US med school because even if you don't get matched as an IMG you can still practice elsewhere.
 

futuregirlmed

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For what's worth the international student came from a country with ORM ethnicity, so the competition is even more fierce.

Sorry I don't know the answer to your question. I would guess it's more risky to get into a US med school because even if you don't get matched as an IMG you can still practice elsewhere.
Thank you for your help, I'll keep it in mind! :)
 
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