OP
RadiologyPD
Mar 4, 2017
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Attending Physician
I had a few questions for you. I'm in somewhat of a different circumstance (maybe not so unique with rads). I was in a unique kind of IM residency program that I started in medical school (I never had to go through the match, so it is unfamiliar to me). I'm currently a PGY-2 (will complete IM residency June 2020). I have had doubts about my specialty choice and have been thinking about trying to switch into radiology for quite sometime. I talked with my home school PD and was able to get an interview for their advanced program. I am now submitting my rank list (only one program as I was unable to go on any other interviews due to busy rotations and was very late to the process). I'm likely being paranoid, but will the system allow me to match even though it won't recognize that I will have completed a "preliminary year" (I am planning on finishing my IM residency prior to starting radiology, if accepted that is). Like I said, I just never went through the match so I'm trying to make sure I am navigating it correctly.

Also, I am trying to figure out a plan of action if I don't match this year. Can I still apply for advanced programs next year even if I don't complete a year of PGY training the year prior to starting radiology residency (I would technically be an attending)? Or do you have to complete a year of preliminary medicine the year prior to radiology residency no matter what? Sorry if this is a dumb question.

Finally, will it look bad next year if I don't match this cycle (again, I only applied to one program). Should I count my losses this year and withdrawal from the match? This program would very likely be my #1 regardless of any other programs I interviewed at because of location. I just don't want to screw my chances to get in next year when I can apply more broadly. If it helps I do feel I'm a competitive applicant to get interviews at least - Step 1 249, Step 2 254, AOA. I feel like I did okay during the interview, I'm not a very good judge of myself in situations like that.

Reading through this I think I am overly worried, but I appreciate your help. Just hopeful to get into radiology!
Yes, you can match. I'm assuming your IM residency is ACGME accredited--if so, the internship year counts (not to mention that you'll be done with the entire residency).

Yes, if you don't match this year, you can apply for advanced programs OR "R" programs next year.

No one will realize that you didn't match this cycle since you are in a residency. It's obvious when a person doesn't match out of medical school since they are typically in a prelim spot when they are applying again. You aren't screwing any chances by only applying to your #1 program this year because of location.

Your stated metrics (Step 1 249, Step 2 254, AOA) are more than sufficient. I'd be surprised if you did not match this year UNLESS you just aren't a good personality match for the program. If you don't match this year, you will definitely match next year by applying more broadly, barring any red flag that hasn't been stated.
 
Apr 20, 2018
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See post #306 and #325. For my program, a candidate's research experience tells us 2 things: (1) how hard did this person work to "check all the boxes" for being a competitive candidate; speaks to motivation more than true research ability/interest; (2) career path: if the person tells me that they are "interested in academics" but hasn't done any research, then they really aren't that interested in academics.

Remember, we don't feel our graduates have to go into academics, BUT we want them to have career paths of which we are proud and which help us recruit great residents in the future--that's easiest to accomplish if the graduate goes into academics. See post #389 for a summary of what we are looking for overall. So not having research experiences is not a deal-breaker, but then I'm going to have to understand what you did instead to show your motivation and what your "dream" is for your work in the future. What do you want to be when you finish residency, and how does that help me?

For us, the research does not have to be in radiology. That may or may not be true for other PDs/selection committees, I just don't know.

It helps to have publications as evidence of the work. Otherwise, I just have to take it on faith that you were effective in getting things done.



I don't have any magic formula to offer in terms of the types of extracurriculars, but it helps to see that you have passion, leadership, stick-with-it, etc. To be honest, this part of the application is just like the way colleges look at high school students, and medical schools look at college students. You should be well familiar with it by now.
Thanks for the feedback!
 
Dec 11, 2018
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Yes, you can match. I'm assuming your IM residency is ACGME accredited--if so, the internship year counts (not to mention that you'll be done with the entire residency).

Yes, if you don't match this year, you can apply for advanced programs OR "R" programs next year.

No one will realize that you didn't match this cycle since you are in a residency. It's obvious when a person doesn't match out of medical school since they are typically in a prelim spot when they are applying again. You aren't screwing any chances by only applying to your #1 program this year because of location.

Your stated metrics (Step 1 249, Step 2 254, AOA) are more than sufficient. I'd be surprised if you did not match this year UNLESS you just aren't a good personality match for the program. If you don't match this year, you will definitely match next year by applying more broadly, barring any red flag that hasn't been stated.
Thanks so much for your time.

So I'm in the process of certifying my ROL now. How does the NRMP know (or does the system just not care) that I will have done a "prelim year" already? I guess what I'm asking is that in order to simply match I don't need to somehow prove that I've already finished a year of residency?

For instance, when I go to certify the system keeps bring up pop-up boxes stating "You have at least one Advanced program on your Primary Rank Order List without a Supplemental Rank Order List attached to it. Are you sure you wish to proceed?"

And then I click yes and it brings up another darn popup box stating something similar about how my supplemental ROL has no programs, so it's making me irrationally worry. Is this OK? I don't see what other option I would have as I will obviously not match into a preliminary or transitional year.
 
OP
RadiologyPD
Mar 4, 2017
159
320
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Attending Physician
To be honest, I don't have any experience with the user end of the ROL certification process for the applicant. I think that they set up those popup boxes to make sure that you realize what path you are pursuing.

If you just match at an Advanced program and haven't done a prelim program, you won't be able to join the Advanced program. If you don't scramble into a prelim spot or otherwise prove you've done a prelim spot, the Advanced program will tell the NRMP after July 1st that they still have an open spot since you can't actually fulfill your commitment to their program, and then NRMP releases them from having to give you the spot and allows them to match a "R" person the following year. This same process is invoked if for some reason a person fails their prelim program or otherwise gets kicked out of their prelim program.

The NRMP doesn't know that you have already successfully completed a "prelim" year. They should know that you matched to a prelim year previously if you actually matched to it, but they don't know that you successfully completed it.
 

Tankstah

2+ Year Member
Feb 26, 2015
191
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Hi Doc, thanks for taking the time to create this incredibly helpful resource for us.

TLDR: how much of a red flag is all high pass in core clerkships? And where does strength of medical school come into your algorithm? Can this make up for average grades?

I read through your detailed explanation of your rank system and am frustrated that my clerkship grades will hurt me. I also read that you had a bit of a rough go on your radiology grade so I know that you are aware that sometimes parts of our clerkship grade can be out of our control. I will likely have mostly if not exclusively high pass on my core clerkship grades. I will absolutely not just pass any, but I keep barely missing honors. I will include anecdotes as an example, but I sincerely am not doing this to complain. I think it’s important for the question. Please skip the next two paragraphs if you aren’t interested in the details.

One rotation I got great comments, multiple “best med student I’ve worked with”, 99th percentile in the shelf, but didn’t “play the game” (read: buddy up with someone who did the rotation recently and know exactly what’s coming) for the standardized patient exam. This resulted in a below average grade on the standardized patient exam which knocked me out of honors because we must be above average in every part of the grading scheme.

Another rotation I was shipped out to a community hospital where the graders are unfamiliar with our extremely vague and strange comment based grading system. I worked incredibly hard, put everything I had into the rotation and surpassed my cohort by more than a standard deviation on the shelf. I met with the course director multiple times to get extra help for the standardized patient exam to make sure my mistakes weren’t repeated... and I high passed again due to “poor” reviews from my community site.

My question is how much of a red flag is all high passes in core clerkship? Can strength of home institution (top 15) make up for this? And finally, how do I explain this in an interview? I legitimately cannot point to a mistake that I am making to miss the grade but I would never explain the situation in this fashion as I know it sounds exceedingly unprofessional and “woe is me.” I’m hesitant to even post this here but I would love some guidance. Thanks again.
 
OP
RadiologyPD
Mar 4, 2017
159
320
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Status
Attending Physician
Don't sweat it too much. High pass is fine if it is a 3 tier system and it means something--at some places, you can literally only get high pass or honors.

For example (and I'm not picking on any school, just looking at my sheet), the average percentile rank of a student getting high pass in Surgery/IM/Peds/OB at the following schools is listed below (this is averaged together):
Duke: 17%
UCSD: 66%

This means that if you got high pass at Duke in those 4 clerkships, you were in the 17th percentile (bottom quintile of the class). If you got high pass at UCSD in those 4 clerkships, you were at the 66th percentile (2nd highest quintile).

If you are applying to my program, I'll know the context of your high pass. That may not be true at other places.

Also, core clerkships are just one metric.
 
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Tankstah

2+ Year Member
Feb 26, 2015
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Don't sweat it too much. High pass is fine if it is a 3 tier system and it means something--at some places, you can literally only get high pass or honors.

For example (and I'm not picking on any school, just looking at my sheet), the average percentile rank of a student getting high pass in Surgery/IM/Peds/OB at the following schools is listed below (this is averaged together):
Duke: 17%
UCSD: 66%

This means that if you got high pass at Duke in those 4 clerkships, you were in the 17th percentile (bottom quintile of the class). If you got high pass at UCSD in those 4 clerkships, you were at the 66th percentile (2nd highest quintile).

If you are applying to my program, I'll know the context of your high pass. That may not be true at other places.

Also, core clerkships are just one metric.
Thanks for the reply. Sincerely appreciate it. Quick follow up, should I be prepared to explain why I have no honors? Or do you think most programs would only ask about "passes"?
 
Oct 26, 2018
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Hi @RadiologyPD

I just wanted to get your imput on a summer research opprotunity. My school doesn't have a residency in radiology, so my research options in the field are quite limited. I was originally planning on doing research in a different field (that I'm less interested in) at my institition, but then an opprotunity came up as an internship through the AAMC as a CI intern. From the job description, it looks like I would be doing literature reviews and research on teaching, alomg with the current state of medical education. I have an extreme interesting in teaching in general, so I was wondering how much of a deal breaker this would be to your program, and other programs, if I decided to follow through with this? I've been also trying to email other insitutions too for radiology specific research, but no one has responded. Even if they did, I would have to pay for two rents, as those are most likely not funded. Thoughts?
 
OP
RadiologyPD
Mar 4, 2017
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Attending Physician
Sounds fine to me. There's no "deal breaker" aspect of this at all. No one is thinking that your research as a medical student is anything other than a reflection of your interest in sharpening your critical thinking and literature review skills, willingness to explore academic activities, and ability to make progress on a project. If you are interested in education, the opportunity sounds great.
 
Oct 26, 2018
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Sounds fine to me. There's no "deal breaker" aspect of this at all. No one is thinking that your research as a medical student is anything other than a reflection of your interest in sharpening your critical thinking and literature review skills, willingness to explore academic activities, and ability to make progress on a project. If you are interested in education, the opportunity sounds great.
Thanks so much for responding back and providing clarity to the process
 
OP
RadiologyPD
Mar 4, 2017
159
320
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Attending Physician
We were happy with the class we got.

We reviewed responses to our anonymous post-interview survey, and it is still frustrating to hear that applicants loved the program but ranked others higher due to geographic preferences. Nearly 70% of the applicants ended up saying that they ranked another program higher due to geographic preferences.

I wonder how to make the system better so that applicants who are very likely going to match at ranks 1-3 don't waste their time on interviews at places that they aren't going to rank in the top 5 due to geography. I can't change the geography of my program, and it is the one thing applicants can be sure about when applying. I get it for people who are "aiming high" and willing to go anywhere for that best program, or who don't have ridiculously good metrics, but I'm talking about the many candidates who applied to my program with ridiculously good metrics who ended up matching at ridiculously good places...outside of my geography. We can only interview so many and hate to not interview candidates who do want my geography just because my interview pool is diluted with those who actually don't want my geography.
 
Oct 6, 2018
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We were happy with the class we got.

We reviewed responses to our anonymous post-interview survey, and it is still frustrating to hear that applicants loved the program but ranked others higher due to geographic preferences. Nearly 70% of the applicants ended up saying that they ranked another program higher due to geographic preferences.

I wonder how to make the system better so that applicants who are very likely going to match at ranks 1-3 don't waste their time on interviews at places that they aren't going to rank in the top 5 due to geography. I can't change the geography of my program, and it is the one thing applicants can be sure about when applying. I get it for people who are "aiming high" and willing to go anywhere for that best program, or who don't have ridiculously good metrics, but I'm talking about the many candidates who applied to my program with ridiculously good metrics who ended up matching at ridiculously good places...outside of my geography. We can only interview so many and hate to not interview candidates who do want my geography just because my interview pool is diluted with those who actually don't want my geography.
Probably can’t make the system better in that regard without sacrificing substantially elsewhere.
 

Americanbum

2+ Year Member
Dec 13, 2015
12
4
41
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Medical Student
We were happy with the class we got.

We reviewed responses to our anonymous post-interview survey, and it is still frustrating to hear that applicants loved the program but ranked others higher due to geographic preferences. Nearly 70% of the applicants ended up saying that they ranked another program higher due to geographic preferences.

I wonder how to make the system better so that applicants who are very likely going to match at ranks 1-3 don't waste their time on interviews at places that they aren't going to rank in the top 5 due to geography. I can't change the geography of my program, and it is the one thing applicants can be sure about when applying. I get it for people who are "aiming high" and willing to go anywhere for that best program, or who don't have ridiculously good metrics, but I'm talking about the many candidates who applied to my program with ridiculously good metrics who ended up matching at ridiculously good places...outside of my geography. We can only interview so many and hate to not interview candidates who do want my geography just because my interview pool is diluted with those who actually don't want my geography.
A lot of people go into radiology for the lifestyle and that makes geographic preference huge. It also doesn't help that its a 4-5 year commitment(if a categorical program).

I think the biggest problem is every year there is almost a 10% increase in applications sent out. The average radiology applications sent out for each applicant : 43.9(2016)>>47.1(2017)>>50.0(2018)>>55.4(2019). At the same time, there's also way more interviews applicants go on. This itself I feel like is the biggest reason you are getting so many interviewees that interview at your program but rank other places higher because they have many more places to choose from.
 
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RadiologyPD
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Sorry if I didn't state what I meant clearly.

I totally get geography as a factor for some people.

My feeling is that applicants with great metrics overinterview. I can't actually get the data from NRMP, but it would be helpful to applicants to know that if they had USMLE scores > "x" and were in the top "y" percentile of the class on the MSPE, that their chance of matching at their #1-"z" spot was approaching 100%. Then, if you really want to live in one of 3 cities in the country and that's super important to you, don't accept the interview at my program which isn't in one of those 3 cities--in fact, only go on "z" + 2 safety interviews total. It will save you money, save me time, and allow me to give that interview spot to some other person for whom my city is in their geographic preference.

My guess for one set of x-y-z numbers above:
250--top quartile--5
 

CharlieBillings

2+ Year Member
Jan 11, 2015
484
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Can you honestly blame applicants for playing to their advantage? The best way to avoid a failed match is to apply to as many programs as possible, and to interview and rank everyone.

Aren't interviews just the same game? "Where do you want to match?" Answer: "Your program".
 
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RadiologyPD
Mar 4, 2017
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No point in arguing about it, and I'm not blaming anyone, just trying to give some perspective to applicants with solid metrics.

As I said, we are pleased with our class.
 
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AFishAnt

2+ Year Member
Jul 14, 2014
16
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Pre-Medical
I'm a 3rd year DO student planning on applying to DR. I'm in the 3rd quartile of my class for pre-clinicals but got a 250 on step 1. I'm worried that being in the 3rd quartile will hurt me especially coming from a DO school so I was wondering if I should address this in my personal statement. There's no outstanding reason for my below average performance in pre-clinicals except that I was not prepared for the memorization-heavy material of medical school coming from an engineering background. My clinical grades are far better but they do not get calculated into our class quartile rank.
 
OP
RadiologyPD
Mar 4, 2017
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Yes, that would be useful information to me the way I look at it, because I would not know that your class ranking was dependent only on your pre-clinical scores. Highlight your clinical performance (if you got honors) by including that in the "Awards & Recognitions" section for Medical School (something like "Grade of Honors in x of y core clerkship rotations" or something like that). Then, touch briefly on it in your PS, it could help, especially if you pull in the stuff about how your engineering background gives you an advantage in whatever way you think it gives you an advantage.
 
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Apr 8, 2019
1
0
1
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How are the RSNA Medical Student Research Grants and Dr. and Mrs. W.C. Culp SIR research grants viewed during your interview selection screening? If a person does not even meet your Step 1/2 cutoffs, would you even see these awards?

Thanks.
 
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May 21, 2018
9
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Hello, I am a Radiology PD who was asked by an SDN administrator who is friend of one of my former fellows to participate in this thread. My understanding is that there may be at least one other PD (by the handle of "Radiology_Advisor") who will participate for now. Here is the request I received:

We are looking to increase attending presence on the forums especially in those specialties, such as DR, where students may not get a lot of exposure during the premed and med school years. Our "AMA" (Ask Me Anything") threads are immensely popular and of course, having PD input benefits all users as your experience and insight is something that we feel would be invaluable and not easily accessible elsewhere. Would you be interested in participating?

For now I prefer to stay anonymous, but it may help to know a bit about me. I graduated from a big Midwest state medical school almost 30 years ago and did my internship/residency out West. I did not entertain the idea of becoming a radiologist until my M3 year, after doing an elective in Radiology that I chose in order to be more familiar with how to get films/reports on my patients prior to my subsequent Internal Medicine and Surgery rotations (in the old days, students were judged by how good they were at getting what you needed from the radiology records department before rounds!). A big part of the reason I chose radiology is because I enjoyed the one-to-one teaching interactions that I saw the academic radiologists doing more than what I saw the academic internists and academic surgeons doing, and I wanted to stay in academics if possible. I've only been at two academic centers in my career--staying at the institution I did my residency & fellowship as an attending for about 5 years, then moving to my present position, which is also out West. I was a Chief Resident and on the residency selection committee at my former institution, and have been a fellowship program director and more recently am the residency program director at my current institution. As a result, I've been involved with the training of many radiologists.

It might have made more sense to start this thread after the upcoming Match, as I'm sure this forum will be buzzing with the results of the Match for a while, but I'm forging ahead now as requested. Heads up, I'm not going to engage into conversations about which program is better, or "chance me" requests, other than to perhaps direct those sorts of inquiries into more a more general discussion of underlying principles. Nevertheless, feel free to ask whatever, and if I don't particularly feel like I should engage or if I don't have a good answer, I won't hesitate to say so. Also, I may not be able to be as responsive as others, but I'll do my best.

Ok, that's it for now. Good luck to all of you who are awaiting the upcoming Match results!
Hi. What can you say about FMG chances to match into Radiology? For example, if i've got: strong research, visa, USMLE scores higher than medium of AMG, and also I have never been to US, exсept passing the USMLE ( no us clicilal expirience). What is my odds?
Thanks for your response!
 

pendaflex1

2+ Year Member
Feb 17, 2017
13
28
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Hi. What can you say about FMG chances to match into Radiology? For example, if i've got: strong research, visa, USMLE scores higher than medium of AMG, and also I have never been to US, exсept passing the USMLE ( no us clicilal expirience). What is my odds?
Thanks for your response!
RadiologyPD has already answered this Q, I think in on the first page. For his/her program they essentially filter out applicants who are IMGs. However, each year there are always some FMGs who match into radiology. I would look at the NRMP data. Also this isn't a what are my chances thread.
 
OP
RadiologyPD
Mar 4, 2017
159
320
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Status
Attending Physician
How are the RSNA Medical Student Research Grants and Dr. and Mrs. W.C. Culp SIR research grants viewed during your interview selection screening? If a person does not even meet your Step 1/2 cutoffs, would you even see these awards?
We have pretty low Step 1 filters in order to pick up individuals who shine in other areas. I'll quickly glance at your application if you are in the 215-220 range just to find some diamonds that just don't have good Step 1 scores (keep in mind that our average resident has Step 1 scores in the 240-250 range). But if you are lower than my already low Step 1 filter, it's very doubtful that I will look at your application at all, unless you are geographically very close (within 100 miles--keep in mind I'm out west).
 
OP
RadiologyPD
Mar 4, 2017
159
320
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Status
Attending Physician
Hi. What can you say about FMG chances to match into Radiology? For example, if i've got: strong research, visa, USMLE scores higher than medium of AMG, and also I have never been to US, exсept passing the USMLE ( no us clicilal expirience). What is my odds?
If you don't need visa support, it helps (that means you are a Permanent Resident or US Citizen, not that you already have a visa that will need to be renewed), because in the current immigration environment, visa sponsorship can get messy and be subject to delays.

AMG Radiology applicants already have USMLE scores higher than the mean of medical students--so your Step 1 needs to be even higher than the average Radiology applicant (i.e., probably over 250)--and even then, it helps you only at those programs that are beholden to USMLE scores.

The way I run our selection, we actually weight relative clinical clerkship results more than USMLE scores (see my previous posts)--so, as a result, because I can't actually compare you to other applicants for that more important metric, we probably won't review your application unless we know you or know of you in some other way.

Be sure to have a native speaker check your application carefully, especially the personal statement. Personally my 2nd language skills suck, so I think it's fantastic that you may be able to speak/write/read very well in English as well as other languages, BUT you just can't have errors like "no us clicilal expirience" and "What is my odds?" in your application because they just set the wrong tone--communication skills will be important.

Some of the best radiologists are IMGs, in my experience. Unfortunately for you, you are just going to have to be so much better than an AMG due to the "risks" a program incurs having an IMG as a resident, especially one that has never been to the US.

Good luck.
 

MaxPlancker

2+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2014
1,147
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Boston
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Medical Student
Hi RadiologyPD,

Thanks so much for the detailed insight into the process, it's very interesting for those of us on the other end. I have a few questions which would be interesting to get your perspective on:

1) For schools that have P/F only clerkships, how do you evaluate their clinical score?
2) How important is the Sub-internship or advanced elective? Is one's performance in this more or less important than in the clerkship? How is this factored into your clinical score?
3) How much do the MSPE comments matter, if most of them are essentially an exchange of superlatives?
4) Do you think a candidate's physical features play a role in the personality score? It does appear that some resident classes have majority good-looking residents!
 
OP
RadiologyPD
Mar 4, 2017
159
320
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Status
Attending Physician
1) For schools that have P/F only clerkships, how do you evaluate their clinical score?
2) How important is the Sub-internship or advanced elective? Is one's performance in this more or less important than in the clerkship? How is this factored into your clinical score?
3) How much do the MSPE comments matter, if most of them are essentially an exchange of superlatives?
4) Do you think a candidate's physical features play a role in the personality score? It does appear that some resident classes have majority good-looking residents!
1. When the school doesn't provide clerkship grades, I have to rely more on USMLE scores for those students, and then also consider more carefully research/LOR/etc at the "invite" stage (things we would have done at the interview stage). I also then rely more on school prestige.
2. Sub-internship experience doesn't factor in. I don't even look at it, because not everyone has done it and most people seem to do well.
3. Agree--MSPE comments aren't very helpful, other than the "relative rank" comments at the end.
4. Ha ha. Subconscious or unconscious bias research suggests that looks confer advantages, but we try not to make it about looks.
 

MaxPlancker

2+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2014
1,147
690
81
Boston
Status
Medical Student
Thanks for answering! Out of curiosity, how do you view LOR/MSPE comments such as "best that I have worked with in XX years"? Are those dime a dozen now to where they make little difference or still rare enough to grab your attention? How, if at all, does purely the letter writer's status (eg clerkship director, famous guy, instructor, etc) play a role?
 
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OP
RadiologyPD
Mar 4, 2017
159
320
81
Status
Attending Physician
Unfortunately, LORs are so subjective that they aren't good discriminators of who will make a better resident. I've written posts about this before--see #124 and #126

There's a bit of literature on how PDs see LORs and you can review that if you want details beyond my bias.

See this article: "https://doi.org/10.4300/JGME-D-17-00712.1"

According to the literature, the best phrases are indeed "I give my highest recommendation" or "best I have worked with in XX years".

But I tend to agree with the commentary written by Dr. Mark Nehler that was tied to a recent article on this subject:

See this article: "https://doi.org/10.4300/JGME-D-18-00258.1 "

"If the applicant is a superstar in all aspects, a letter of recommendation pointing that out is a bit redundant, in my opinion. Most frequently, I use letters of recommendation to find the occasional potential star who does not stand out, with typical metrics, in the application." So an outstanding LOR is most helpful if you aren't killing it in other aspects of your application to highlight aspects of your application -- habits, behaviors, attitudes, personality--that might get overlooked by standard metrics.
 

Attachments

Feb 3, 2019
3
2
1
Status
Medical Student
If you don't need visa support, it helps (that means you are a Permanent Resident or US Citizen, not that you already have a visa that will need to be renewed), because in the current immigration environment, visa sponsorship can get messy and be subject to delays.

AMG Radiology applicants already have USMLE scores higher than the mean of medical students--so your Step 1 needs to be even higher than the average Radiology applicant (i.e., probably over 250)--and even then, it helps you only at those programs that are beholden to USMLE scores.

The way I run our selection, we actually weight relative clinical clerkship results more than USMLE scores (see my previous posts)--so, as a result, because I can't actually compare you to other applicants for that more important metric, we probably won't review your application unless we know you or know of you in some other way.

Be sure to have a native speaker check your application carefully, especially the personal statement. Personally my 2nd language skills suck, so I think it's fantastic that you may be able to speak/write/read very well in English as well as other languages, BUT you just can't have errors like "no us clicilal expirience" and "What is my odds?" in your application because they just set the wrong tone--communication skills will be important.

Some of the best radiologists are IMGs, in my experience. Unfortunately for you, you are just going to have to be so much better than an AMG due to the "risks" a program incurs having an IMG as a resident, especially one that has never been to the US.

Good luck.
Thank you for taking the time to answer our questions. I had a question regarding electives as an FMG.
In your opinion, do you think as an FMG, the applicant should undertake all three electives in DR/IR or would you like to see letter from medicine and surgery electives too?
 

knosway14

2+ Year Member
Jul 1, 2015
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Hi radiology PD.

I did apply to radiology in the 2017-2018 and did not Match. So I joined a radiology residency program in Spain (Europe).

I'm considering to re-apply.

Question is : Do you think 2 years of radiology residency experience would increase my chances significantly ?

I'm a FMG, I would need a visa sponsorship.

YOG Dec 2014.
Steps 243/238/228.
A few pubs and few abstracts.

Thanks.
 
OP
RadiologyPD
Mar 4, 2017
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In your opinion, do you think as an FMG, the applicant should undertake all three electives in DR/IR or would you like to see letter from medicine and surgery electives too?
Electives only good if they translate to impressing a decision-influencer in that residency of your value to the residency. Pick those that give you consistent experience with a small group of faculty who have some influence. Letters that come from non-radiology rotations are usually not that impactful.

How much focus on clinical excellence is there for selection of chief residents? It seems to be the well-liked, outgoing, schmoozing type people..
The chief resident role in our program:
1. Advocate and spokesperson for resident concerns (has the trust of the other residents)
2. Attention to collective resident wellness, including helping develop sense of community amongst the residents (motivated to see that others are doing well)
3. Assist with mechanics of interview process for resident selection (be inspirational to potential applicants)
4. Liaison between Program Administration and residents (good communication skills, on top of things)
5. Attend AUR meeting (chief resident part of the meeting) and represent our program well (be impressive, don't be a jerk)
6. Adjudicate issues related to residents (fair, thoughtful)
7. Help oversee process of making certain aspects of the resident schedule (though I have a large role in this, which may be different than at other programs) (organized)
8. Attend department Education Committee meetings (able to be effective resident advocate, interested in resident education)
9. Help organize and improve resident efforts for medical student education/rotations (cares about the experience of students)

"Clinical excellence"--not really that important for any of the above tasks, BUT often the best residents for those tasks are the best clinically because they've worked the hardest, have the trust of the faculty, etc. Since some of the tasks take excellent people skills, being well-liked helps (not easy to have people trust you/support you if you are the most clinically excellent but smart-ass resident)

I did apply to radiology in the 2017-2018 and did not Match. So I joined a radiology residency program in Spain (Europe).

I'm considering to re-apply.

Question is : Do you think 2 years of radiology residency experience would increase my chances significantly ?

I'm a FMG, I would need a visa sponsorship.

YOG Dec 2014.
Steps 243/238/228.
A few pubs and few abstracts.

Thanks.
If you had completed a residency elsewhere, and even more so if you have experience as a radiologist but were not too far from training, it might be a hook that could help. Not sure a few years will help much by itself. You need a hook, see earlier posts.