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Should I change my major?

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Should I change my major?

  • Public Health/minor in BIMS

    Votes: 2 100.0%
  • BIMS/minor in Public health

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    2

TAMUGP

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Hello everyone,

I am currently a sophomore, soon to be junior, at Texas A&M University and recently, I have been really been stressed about and have been trying to reevaluate myself and I need some guidance. Here is my dilemma:

So I really love being challenged and as masochistic as this seems, I love struggling in classes (and then eventually grasping the ideas), granted I am not the only one. I am currently a Public Health major and I am wanting to switch into TAMU's BIMS program. I am at the point in my UG career where I have taken just enough classes in my major for it to constitute as a minor, so this is my last chance to do any real "major changing" before I set it in stone. The Public Health program is rather new (for undergrad) but has had a good history with masters and doctorate degrees. When I am in Public Health, I will be honest, it is a bit easier than if I were have to take all of the hard science classes that BIMS will offer, but as I said, I like the challenge and I like struggling. At the end of this semester, I felt a void in my heart. I felt unsatisfied. Also with the UG Public Health program here at TAMU, I am not really able to specialize (but I guess that's why people get a masters typically in many fields?). I feel as if the degree is too broad. I am taking classes related to social behavior, law, and some science, but it is not focused enough on the science aspect for me. On the flip side, the BIMS degree is tailored towards getting into medical/professional school, and stories have been told that if you do not get into Med school or Dental or what have you, then you practically have a "useless" degree and work in low compensation jobs. My advisors have told me that it would be better to stick with public health since it is more flexible. So say I decide not to pursue medical school no longer, the degree would not be "useless". Don't get me wrong, I do enjoy Public Health. I do realize that BIMS will most likely lower my GPA, but I also believe that being challenged more by the coursework will be good for me in the future. I also think the content of BIMS is more interesting. I realize how cliche Biology majors are for medical school and I also realize that BIMS is practically the same thing. When it comes to interviews, I truly believe I can nail the interview when they ask questions about my Public Health major and that type of stuff.

I have considered one of the following:

Major in Public Health and minor in BIMS

Major in BIMS and minor in Public Health

Double Major in Public Health and BIMS (not likely)

I have always been told that your undergraduate degree should be more broad and flexible, and as you get a masters, you specialize more and more and more. An example of a niche degree would be Petroleum Engineering or Aerospace Engineering. A more flexible one would be Electrical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering (sorry for the swap on context but its just used as an example). In terms of science, you would major in Physics as your UG. Then on the masters and doctoral level, maybe specialize in Astrophysics or something. I think you guys get the idea. I also realize minors are "worthless", but it fills the resume and its actually a true area of interest I like to also study.

I am in desperate need of advice and guidance. I still really want to further my education, whether it be medical school or graduate school (or both), but I also do not want to pick the wrong undergraduate major for self fulfillment purposes. Feel free to message me.

I just don't want to feel secure with a quality job post-bacc. I realize people say your major does not matter and its about experience etc, but I just can't help but think this.
 

LizzyM

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People might not respond because they don't know that BIMS is biomedical science. The core of that program appears to be the typical "pre-med" classes: bio, chem, o-chem, physics, calc I. A social & behavior science and a humanities/language/culture course are required and with the right choices, could meet MD school requirements.

Undergrad majors in public health are relatively new and I rarely see them when I look at med school applications.

It all comes down to what is going to get you the best GPA. A secondary consideration might be the job or degree you'd be qualified for if you don't get into medical school and you go out into the job market or grad school with whatever undergrad degree you leave with.
 
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TAMUGP

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People might not respond because they don't know that BIMS is biomedical science. The core of that program appears to be the typical "pre-med" classes: bio, chem, o-chem, physics, calc I. A social & behavior science and a humanities/language/culture course are required and with the right choices, could meet MD school requirements.

Undergrad majors in public health are relatively new and I rarely see them when I look at med school applications.

It all comes down to what is going to get you the best GPA. A secondary consideration might be the job or degree you'd be qualified for if you don't get into medical school and you go out into the job market or grad school with whatever undergrad degree you leave with.

I appreciate your prompt response. I should have not used the abbreviation for biomedical science. I just hope being a relatively new degree isn't a downfall.
 

Cookiess

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Pick the major and area of study you think you would most enjoy, both are good options. It sounds like a degree in Public Health would provide you with more versatile career options if you decide not to go with the med school route. What you could do is stick with your Public Health major and also take the pre-med requirements so that you'd be ready to apply to med school in case you decide to go that route. You could also mix in some BIMS courses that you would enjoy.

Whether you decide to apply to med school or not, you should focus on doing well academically and graduating with a solid GPA either way. If I were you, I'd probably pick the Public Health major with a minor in BIMS so that you'd have more versatile career options while also having opportunities to take the more challenging/interesting BIMS classes that you'd enjoy.
 
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