repoetic

2+ Year Member
Sep 11, 2015
27
1
Status
Pre-Medical
Hey everyone! I'm new to posting on the student doctor network but definitely not to the forums as I've always found them very informative. I was posting because I just started my freshman year of college and even though I've been telling people I'm interested in medicine, I'm begin to really question that. The thing is, I worked as a cashier at Target last summer and I really hated having to be in a role that served others. I felt sick of having to make all the stupid customers feel like royalty and I was waiting on them hand and foot. In fact, I applied to be on sales floor stocking shelves later on just so I wouldn't have to serve people all day. I've become concerned that I would be a horrible fit for medicine because if I loathe ringing up people's items, wouldn't I also hate answering people's questions about their health all day? I'm very ignorant of the medical field but this aspect of my personality I've discovered has me worried. I love helping people feel better and get so much joy from comforting people in distress which is why I wanted to become a primary care physician so I can become friends with all my patients but I'm afraid it might not be a career for me. Does anyone have advice? Should I even stick with premed? Sorry for all the rambling!!
 

md-2020

The Immaculate Catch
2+ Year Member
Jun 29, 2015
2,298
3,007
Status
Medical Student
Shadow some different docs and decide for yourself.



Unless this is a troll post, b/c there's definitely some sentences in there that have me cringing.
 

gyngyn

Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Lifetime Donor
7+ Year Member
Nov 4, 2011
24,122
40,041
Status
Attending Physician
  • Like
Reactions: Goro

allantois

5+ Year Member
Jan 27, 2013
3,816
4,078
Status
Other Health Professions Student
There's nothing more pleasurable than making people feel happy, as long as I'm getting paid well to do it ;)
 

Mad Jack

Critically Caring
5+ Year Member
Jul 27, 2013
35,550
65,163
4th Dimension
Hey everyone! I'm new to posting on the student doctor network but definitely not to the forums as I've always found them very informative. I was posting because I just started my freshman year of college and even though I've been telling people I'm interested in medicine, I'm begin to really question that. The thing is, I worked as a cashier at Target last summer and I really hated having to be in a role that served others. I felt sick of having to make all the stupid customers feel like royalty and I was waiting on them hand and foot. In fact, I applied to be on sales floor stocking shelves later on just so I wouldn't have to serve people all day. I've become concerned that I would be a horrible fit for medicine because if I loathe ringing up people's items, wouldn't I also hate answering people's questions about their health all day? I'm very ignorant of the medical field but this aspect of my personality I've discovered has me worried. I love helping people feel better and get so much joy from comforting people in distress which is why I wanted to become a primary care physician so I can become friends with all my patients but I'm afraid it might not be a career for me. Does anyone have advice? Should I even stick with premed? Sorry for all the rambling!!
Ah, see, here's the thing. I was once like you. After being a janitor, a fast food line cook, and a cold storage warehouse worker, I finally got a job I thought I could stand- working in retail sales. Not only was I good at it, but I was damn near the best- I was pulling $18.10 an hour as a 19 year old kid that could balance trust and fear just right- enough to convince a person something was worth buying, but that they should be scared as **** that that product was actually horrible and going to betray them within 1-3 years.

Now, I did that job for two and a half years before I decided that maybe, just maybe I should go back to school, because I couldn't stand customers. I liked them fine as people, but when they complained- oh you're out of stock on this superfluous item I'll replace in a year and a half, I want to speak to your manager blah blah blah- it just made me die a little on the inside. Because, at the end of the day, it was a pointless exchange. I didn't hate working with people, I hated doing it in a meaningless and superfluous capacity. So I got an allied health degree and started working with people I could help with something real, notably not ****ing dying. And the magic thing was, it didn't matter if they thanked me or they liked me or they hated me, because what I was doing mattered, and that made me feel good.

Med school was just the next step, a chance to do something a little more real in an increasingly superficial society that is consumed by materialism and mind-numbingly senseless consumerism and nonsense. Doing something worth doing makes my life feel worthwhile, basically.
 
OP
R

repoetic

2+ Year Member
Sep 11, 2015
27
1
Status
Pre-Medical
So... the consensus is I should stick with being pre-med? Also, I thought about radiology but I really want to get to know different patients so I can directly feel like I'm helping them feel better and just being a friendly face they can rely on.
 

Dr.Sticks

2+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2014
1,118
620
Status
Pre-Medical
It's different; I work with patients currently as a volunteer and it is a lot more fun/rewarding.
I wouldn't last an hour at all though as a store clerk.. However making sick people feel better by spending time with them I really enjoy.

My suggestion is do some Hospital volunteering where you get direct patient contact and figure it out.
 

Goro

7+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
53,587
78,785
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status
Non-Student
I can't resist...you were selling Fords???


[QUOTE=" I was pulling $18.10 an hour as a 19 year old kid that could balance trust and fear just right- enough to convince a person something was worth buying, but that they should be scared as **** that that product was actually horrible and going to betray them within 1-3 years.[/QUOTE]
 

teeayejay

2+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2014
1,491
2,076
Status
Medical Student
I work in the ER and some patients are truly bottom-feeders whether it's druggies who just left a different ER yesterday trying to find their new fix today or that pretentious ass stay-at-home mom who just needs some attention...people are difficult by nature and it can feel like you're treading water. Call me naive but when I come across the individuals who are actually thankful for my small service, it makes the day that much brighter and makes it easier to laugh off the difficult folks.

Do you need instant recognition for your services from each and every person? Or can you get by with the few people in this world who are actually grateful while knowing that you're making a bigger impact?
 
Last edited:

Gandyy

5+ Year Member
Aug 8, 2014
3,452
2,135
Status
Medical Student
Ah, see, here's the thing. I was once like you. After being a janitor, a fast food line cook, and a cold storage warehouse worker, I finally got a job I thought I could stand- working in retail sales. Not only was I good at it, but I was damn near the best- I was pulling $18.10 an hour as a 19 year old kid that could balance trust and fear just right- enough to convince a person something was worth buying, but that they should be scared as **** that that product was actually horrible and going to betray them within 1-3 years.

Now, I did that job for two and a half years before I decided that maybe, just maybe I should go back to school, because I couldn't stand customers. I liked them fine as people, but when they complained- oh you're out of stock on this superfluous item I'll replace in a year and a half, I want to speak to your manager blah blah blah- it just made me die a little on the inside. Because, at the end of the day, it was a pointless exchange. I didn't hate working with people, I hated doing it in a meaningless and superfluous capacity. So I got an allied health degree and started working with people I could help with something real, notably not ****ing dying. And the magic thing was, it didn't matter if they thanked me or they liked me or they hated me, because what I was doing mattered, and that made me feel good.

Med school was just the next step, a chance to do something a little more real in an increasingly superficial society that is consumed by materialism and mind-numbingly senseless consumerism and nonsense. Doing something worth doing makes my life feel worthwhile, basically.
I bet you had a hell of a lot to say during your interview.

I thought my healthcare stories with patients were pretty good, but yours probably blow mine out of the water. I agree with you that "Doing something worth doing makes my life feel worthwhile, basically." is very important. Fulfillment is very important to me. Doing something seriously meaningful. Its definitely part of the "why medicine" for me, but I think that component is a part of "why medicine" for almost everyone.
 

Glazedonutlove

2+ Year Member
Jan 3, 2015
3,728
2,993
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I bet you had a hell of a lot to say during your interview.

I thought my healthcare stories with patients were pretty good, but yours probably blow mine out of the water. I agree with you that "Doing something worth doing makes my life feel worthwhile, basically." is very important. Fulfillment is very important to me. Doing something seriously meaningful. Its definitely part of the "why medicine" for me, but I think that component is a part of "why medicine" for almost everyone.
I've given up trying to be unique in the why medicine answer
 

Mad Jack

Critically Caring
5+ Year Member
Jul 27, 2013
35,550
65,163
4th Dimension
I can't resist...you were selling Fords???


[QUOTE=" I was pulling $18.10 an hour as a 19 year old kid that could balance trust and fear just right- enough to convince a person something was worth buying, but that they should be scared as **** that that product was actually horrible and going to betray them within 1-3 years.
Lol, my next job was selling used cars ;)
 

TexasSurgeon

I don't pay state taxes
Gold Donor
7+ Year Member
Jul 5, 2012
2,639
1,270
Starship Enterprise
Status
Medical Student
I can't resist...you were selling Fords???


[QUOTE=" I was pulling $18.10 an hour as a 19 year old kid that could balance trust and fear just right- enough to convince a person something was worth buying, but that they should be scared as **** that that product was actually horrible and going to betray them within 1-3 years.
[/QUOTE]
LOL hey the Ford SVT Raptor is amazing OK?
 

Dr.Sticks

2+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2014
1,118
620
Status
Pre-Medical
It makes me wonder how they even choose applicants after interviews, since the majority of us probably sound the same
I think a lot of the applicants have 0 EC activity, or very poor stats and they get weeded out fast.

Regarding being unique, I think pretty much all you can do in that regard is be
Ex.Navy Seal, Green Beret, etc
Former peace corp or Americorp Vistas member
Win the Nobel Peace Prize
Win a prestigious scholarship/fellowship type thing(Rhode)
You could be a published author
Be a national figure
Organize a massive charity/non-profit

Now actually achieving any of that? Difficult.. Well minus the peace corp/Americorp thing most folks have a decent shot of getting in and getting the opportunity to serve. I think most could become a published author too, but I wouldn't do it to pad a med school application.. Would only do it if you enjoy it.

And the best thing you could do? Cure cancer.. lol (joke /sarcasm)
 

Glazedonutlove

2+ Year Member
Jan 3, 2015
3,728
2,993
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I think a lot of the applicants have 0 EC activity, or very poor stats and they get weeded out fast.

Regarding being unique, I think pretty much all you can do in that regard is be
Ex.Navy Seal, Green Beret, etc
Former peace corp or Americorp Vistas member
Win the Nobel Peace Prize
Win a prestigious scholarship/fellowship type thing(Rhode)
You could be a published author
Be a national figure
Organize a massive charity/non-profit

Now actually achieving any of that? Difficult.. Well minus the peace corp/Americorp thing most folks have a decent shot of getting in and getting the opportunity to serve. I think most could become a published author too, but I wouldn't do it to pad a med school application.. Would only do it if you enjoy it.

And the best thing you could do? Cure cancer.. lol (joke /sarcasm)
@Mad Jack did none of those and his story is pretty damn unique I would say lol. I just feel that my reasons for going into medicine are very similar to many others, but that is okay since it is honest.
 

Spinach Dip

Delicious with nachos
5+ Year Member
Feb 10, 2012
3,006
3,523
Earth
Status
I think most could become a published author too, but I wouldn't do it to pad a med school application.. Would only do it if you enjoy it.
Writing a book and getting published are 2 completely different things..... Unless you are going to self-publish, in which case, yes, anyone can do it.
 

Dr.Sticks

2+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2014
1,118
620
Status
Pre-Medical
@Mad Jack did none of those and his story is pretty damn unique I would say lol. I just feel that my reasons for going into medicine are very similar to many others, but that is okay since it is honest.
Yup; I was just pointing out what med schools mainly look for in uniqueness.
Check out this chart on Hopkins
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/som/admissions/md/students/class_statistics.html

And then notice where they brag
Who they are "Veterans, Rhodes Scholars, Authors,"
 

blackroses

2+ Year Member
Apr 24, 2014
586
875
Status
Pre-Medical
I can't resist...you were selling Fords???


[QUOTE=" I was pulling $18.10 an hour as a 19 year old kid that could balance trust and fear just right- enough to convince a person something was worth buying, but that they should be scared as **** that that product was actually horrible and going to betray them within 1-3 years.
[/QUOTE]
Why did you have to go there?! I really liked you! :(

I am disappointed!
 

StudyLater

2+ Year Member
Jan 4, 2015
1,993
1,252
Status
Pre-Medical
Because, at the end of the day, it was a pointless exchange. I didn't hate working with people, I hated doing it in a meaningless and superfluous capacity.
Very apt description of the sort of work one ends up doing without a college education (and often times even then....)

So I got an allied health degree and started working with people I could help with something real, notably not ****ing dying. And the magic thing was, it didn't matter if they thanked me or they liked me or they hated me, because what I was doing mattered, and that made me feel good.

Med school was just the next step, a chance to do something a little more real in an increasingly superficial society that is consumed by materialism and mind-numbingly senseless consumerism and nonsense. Doing something worth doing makes my life feel worthwhile, basically.
Adcoms are like:



@Mad Jack is like:

 

Glazedonutlove

2+ Year Member
Jan 3, 2015
3,728
2,993
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
You all really sound quite different (except for the rehearsed delivery...).
so the rehearsed thing is pretty common?

That's interesting, I wish I could be an interviewer for a day and see what these differences are. Do you immediately disqualify applicants who are more reserved/introverted?
 

gyngyn

Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Lifetime Donor
7+ Year Member
Nov 4, 2011
24,122
40,041
Status
Attending Physician
so the rehearsed thing is pretty common?

That's interesting, I wish I could be an interviewer for a day and see what these differences are. Do you immediately disqualify applicants who are more reserved/introverted?
No, but rehearsed answers are the equivalent of taking about 3 points off your (old) MCAT.
On the new MCAT it's about 5 (depending on where you are on the curve).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Goro and StudyLater

Glazedonutlove

2+ Year Member
Jan 3, 2015
3,728
2,993
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
No, but it is the equivalent of taking about 3 points off your (old) MCAT.
On the new MCAT it about 5 (depending on where you are on the curve).
lol, so much more specific than I was expecting! Now I'm curious, how many points for awkwardness
 
  • Like
Reactions: StudyLater

Glazedonutlove

2+ Year Member
Jan 3, 2015
3,728
2,993
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
My interview was very relaxed and nice, we'll see how I do in those stress interviews o_O
 

Glazedonutlove

2+ Year Member
Jan 3, 2015
3,728
2,993
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Maniacal laughter, tugging relentlessly at blemishes, crying, curling up like a cooked shrimp as each question is asked...
LOL you have the craziest experiences with interviewees!
(unless this behavior is routinely seen at interviews...)
 

StudyLater

2+ Year Member
Jan 4, 2015
1,993
1,252
Status
Pre-Medical
@gyngyn someone has literally cried? Guy, girl, or both?

I thought that only happened in public presentations. I once saw this really nice (but insecure) guy get so overcome he just started tearing up and ran out. Was really intense.
 

Goro

7+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
53,587
78,785
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status
Non-Student
It's a car, not a family member!

Why did you have to go there?! I really liked you! :(

I am disappointed![/QUOTE]
 

gyngyn

Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Lifetime Donor
7+ Year Member
Nov 4, 2011
24,122
40,041
Status
Attending Physician
@gyngyn someone has literally cried? Guy, girl, or both?

I thought that only happened in public presentations. I once saw this really nice (but insecure) guy get so overcome he just started tearing up and ran out. Was really intense.
About every two weeks.
No sex or gender is immune.
 
  • Like
Reactions: StudyLater