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Hi Everyone!
Temple anesthesia chief residents here. We wanted to open up a thread to tell you about our program, as well as answer any questions that you may have.

Temple University Hospital is a major academic center that performs a wide variety of cases in every surgical discipline. Collectively, the Temple Health System performs >12,000 inpatient surgeries and nearly 17,000 outpatient surgeries annually. Our clinical training primarily takes place at Temple University Hospital (TUH); a 722-bed tertiary care center situated in North Philadelphia. Temple University Hospital is the ‘safety net’ hospital to many in underserved patients in our community, while at the same time, it has earned the distinction of being destination care for many complex acute medical and surgical conditions. We enjoy a robust cardiac surgery service. Temple is the #1 lung transplant center by volume for the past 2 consecutive years and is a national leader in performing pulmonary thromboendarterectomies. With 335 annual solid-organ transplants annually, the anesthesia residents are exposed early to complex cases with high acuity including heart, lung, kidney, and liver transplants. Additionally, as a level 1 Trauma Center, our anesthesiology residents quickly become adept at resuscitation of critically ill trauma patients involving massive transfusion protocol. Our busy obstetric floor averages >2,600 births annually providing excellent obstetric anesthesia exposure. A busy orthopedic, vascular, and general surgery department allow significant exposure to regional anesthesia, and our residents perform many regional blocks for both intraoperative anesthetic and postoperative pain management. Pediatric rotations occur at the top-ranking Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) during CA-2 year, and St. Christopher’s Children’s Hospital during CA-3 year. Several elective rotations are offered to our CA-3 residents including multiple international electives in Kijabe Kenya, Addis Ababa Ethiopia, and Kigali Rwanda.
Our recently revamped didactic curriculum has greatly benefited our residents with a 100% board pass rate since changes have taken effect. The education program begins in the CA 1 year with an intensive one-month orientation program. Throughout the CA-1 year, a series of brief online lectures focused on ABA keywords provides complete exposure to the curriculum for the Basic Exam. Every Tuesday, residents of each class participate in a half-day didactic, simulation, or oral board/OSCE preparation activity, and several of our faculty have served as oral board examiners for the national exam. Our state-of-the-art simulation center at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine provides every opportunity to hone our clinical skills in a simulation environment including becoming oriented and adept at acquiring and recognizing standard basic echocardiographic views on the recently purchased an interactive transesophageal and transthoracic echo simulation model.
Every academic year, residents are given a two-week research block to pursue quality improvement or research interests, and residents are encouraged early in the CA-1 year to work on case reports for presentation at the ASA annual meeting. Participation at other regional and national anesthesia meetings is also supported and encouraged. The department subsidizes travel to these meetings for residents who are presenting authors. Last year we have sent residents to the ASA, SCA, SOAP, and ASRA annual meetings.
Our residents have demonstrated a propensity for leadership and success through various appointments on national, state, and hospital-wide councils, and our graduates have matched to many prestigious fellowships in every subspecialty (OB, acute pain, chronic pain, cardiothoracic, critical care). We feel that when you graduate from Temple’s anesthesiology residency, your clinical training will be second to none and you will be well positioned to pursue fellowship opportunities, take academic appointments, or join private practice.


We hope that our passion for the training offered at Temple is apparent, and we would be happy to answer any question you may have.
 

nimbus

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Are you absorbing any Drexel/Hahnemann residents and faculty?
 
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deleted171991

This is the best ad for your program:

Do you still have the same chair? If not, why?
 
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Are you absorbing any Drexel/Hahnemann residents and faculty?

Hi @nimbus, we are working with the ACGME to see how many Hahnemann residents we will be allowed to take on, and are actively working with their department to facilitate an easy transition for anyone that we are able to bring on board.
I think that everyone in Philadelphia, and in the medical community at large feels strongly for the Hahnemann residents/faculty/staff, and we hope they are doing everything within their power to help them.
I imagine we are also looking at bringing on some faculty as well, but that is out of the scope of my involvement.
 
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This is the best ad for your program:

Do you still have the same chair? If not, why?

Hi @FFP - I could not agree with you more!!! I very actively read that thread while I was applying/awaiting match results. Everything put out in that thread by our Chair further reaffirmed my belief that Temple was the perfect place for me to train. He is even more inspiring in person. For anyone that has not viewed our Chair's thread, I strongly encourage you to do so. We are extraordinarily luck to have a department chair that not only strongly believes in the residency, but serves as a mentor for all.

I am a huge believer in 'leading by example', and the mentorship approach to residency training. I believe that this tone is set by our chair, and echoed by our faculty. There is a focus in the department in not only creating excellent anesthesiologists, but leaders in the field. This is encouraged through not only behaviors, but by encouragement of all of our faculty and residents of all levels to have early involvement in hospital committees and board, as well as at the state and national level.
 
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deleted171991

The interesting thing is that he hasn't posted in moire than a year, which makes one wonder whether he's still at Temple. ;)
 

rakotomazoto

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Generic accounts like these are highly suspect sources of information on SDN. Can't help but view this all with cynicism, it is coming across as damage control. Why are you posting this now? Did you receive some bad feedback from applicants? This feels like a PR move, was curious why this is necessary. Our chief residents were always super-busy, they wouldn't have had the time or initiative to start a program-specific SDN thread unless it was part of a larger plan by the program/department.
 
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radsisrad

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Generic accounts like these are highly suspect sources of information on SDN. Can't help but view this all with cynicism, it is coming across as damage control. Why are you posting this now? Did you receive some bad feedback from applicants? This feels like a PR move, was curious why this is necessary. Our chief residents were always super-busy, they wouldn't have had the time or initiative to start a program-specific SDN thread unless it was part of a larger plan by the program/department.

Usually posted by programs recently placed on/taken off probation.
 

abolt18

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Hi Everyone!
Temple anesthesia chief residents here. We wanted to open up a thread to tell you about our program, as well as answer any questions that you may have.

Temple University Hospital is a major academic center that performs a wide variety of cases in every surgical discipline. Collectively, the Temple Health System performs >12,000 inpatient surgeries and nearly 17,000 outpatient surgeries annually. Our clinical training primarily takes place at Temple University Hospital (TUH); a 722-bed tertiary care center situated in North Philadelphia. Temple University Hospital is the ‘safety net’ hospital to many in underserved patients in our community, while at the same time, it has earned the distinction of being destination care for many complex acute medical and surgical conditions. We enjoy a robust cardiac surgery service. Temple is the #1 lung transplant center by volume for the past 2 consecutive years and is a national leader in performing pulmonary thromboendarterectomies. With 335 annual solid-organ transplants annually, the anesthesia residents are exposed early to complex cases with high acuity including heart, lung, kidney, and liver transplants. Additionally, as a level 1 Trauma Center, our anesthesiology residents quickly become adept at resuscitation of critically ill trauma patients involving massive transfusion protocol. Our busy obstetric floor averages >2,600 births annually providing excellent obstetric anesthesia exposure. A busy orthopedic, vascular, and general surgery department allow significant exposure to regional anesthesia, and our residents perform many regional blocks for both intraoperative anesthetic and postoperative pain management. Pediatric rotations occur at the top-ranking Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) during CA-2 year, and St. Christopher’s Children’s Hospital during CA-3 year. Several elective rotations are offered to our CA-3 residents including multiple international electives in Kijabe Kenya, Addis Ababa Ethiopia, and Kigali Rwanda.
Our recently revamped didactic curriculum has greatly benefited our residents with a 100% board pass rate since changes have taken effect. The education program begins in the CA 1 year with an intensive one-month orientation program. Throughout the CA-1 year, a series of brief online lectures focused on ABA keywords provides complete exposure to the curriculum for the Basic Exam. Every Tuesday, residents of each class participate in a half-day didactic, simulation, or oral board/OSCE preparation activity, and several of our faculty have served as oral board examiners for the national exam. Our state-of-the-art simulation center at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine provides every opportunity to hone our clinical skills in a simulation environment including becoming oriented and adept at acquiring and recognizing standard basic echocardiographic views on the recently purchased an interactive transesophageal and transthoracic echo simulation model.
Every academic year, residents are given a two-week research block to pursue quality improvement or research interests, and residents are encouraged early in the CA-1 year to work on case reports for presentation at the ASA annual meeting. Participation at other regional and national anesthesia meetings is also supported and encouraged. The department subsidizes travel to these meetings for residents who are presenting authors. Last year we have sent residents to the ASA, SCA, SOAP, and ASRA annual meetings.
Our residents have demonstrated a propensity for leadership and success through various appointments on national, state, and hospital-wide councils, and our graduates have matched to many prestigious fellowships in every subspecialty (OB, acute pain, chronic pain, cardiothoracic, critical care). We feel that when you graduate from Temple’s anesthesiology residency, your clinical training will be second to none and you will be well positioned to pursue fellowship opportunities, take academic appointments, or join private practice.


We hope that our passion for the training offered at Temple is apparent, and we would be happy to answer any question you may have.
What should your lung transplant numbers look like in the future? Didn't you guys recently lose one of your surgeons who I believe put up pretty big numbers?
 
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Generic accounts like these are highly suspect sources of information on SDN. Can't help but view this all with cynicism, it is coming across as damage control. Why are you posting this now? Did you receive some bad feedback from applicants? This feels like a PR move, was curious why this is necessary. Our chief residents were always super-busy, they wouldn't have had the time or initiative to start a program-specific SDN thread unless it was part of a larger plan by the program/department.
@rakotomazoto & @radsisrad ,
I certainly appreciate your skepticism. Fortunately, we are not in a situation of needing to do damage control. Without a doubt this is some form of a 'PR move' though - I want to paint as clear of a picture of what our residency life is like here at Temple as possible. The timing of this post (early July) is strictly correlated to the fact that we just assumed our new roles as chiefs. The opening post in this thread is almost exactly a 'copy/paste' from our chief statement that will be available on our residency website shortly. Whereas yes, we are very busy, the both of us feel strongly that it is our duty as chiefs not only to advocate for our current residents, but to also promote the program as a whole. In much the same way that I was encouraged by reading our Chair's thread when I was applying, I was hoping that we could provide that type of feedback to future residents, but from a current resident's perspective.
Our idea behind opening up this thread was to provide any applicant to our program with as much information regarding what life is like as a Temple resident as possible. I genuinely have loved my time at Temple, I think that it is a diamond in the rough and a truly exceptional place for residency training.
If it's any testament to how I feel about our program, I'm posting on SDN of my own volition, after I came home from work, with my 14 week old daughter strapped to my chest.
Please let me know if theres anything else that I can clear up, I can only promise transparency.

Respectfully,
 
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What should your lung transplant numbers look like in the future? Didn't you guys recently lose one of your surgeons who I believe put up pretty big numbers?
@abolt18
hi! I honestly cannot foresee any reason for our lung transplant numbers to do anything but to continue to increase. The majority of our cardiovascular surgeons have remained stable since I have been at Temple. The surgical aspect of our lung transplant teams is spearheaded by Dr. Toyoda, the surgical director of thoracic transplantation and Chief of Cardiovascular Surgery. He has been with Temple since before the 'Boom' in our lung transplant volume, and it appears that helping as many individuals as possible thru lung transplant is a passion of his, along with our entire lung transplant department. Early, and frequent exposure to lung transplantation can almost be guaranteed in our residency program.
 
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deleted697127

Generic accounts like these are highly suspect sources of information on SDN. Can't help but view this all with cynicism, it is coming across as damage control. Why are you posting this now? Did you receive some bad feedback from applicants? This feels like a PR move, was curious why this is necessary. Our chief residents were always super-busy, they wouldn't have had the time or initiative to start a program-specific SDN thread unless it was part of a larger plan by the program/department.


Sometimes i wonder if thats how i come across when talking to Med students on the interview trail but i just genuinely like where i trained. I try not to bull**** people. Up to them what they want to believe.

Also if there’s damaged to be controlled, posting on SDN is just asking to expose it.
 
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coolfay93

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Appreciate this thread, and your motivation behind it. One of my senior is matched to your advanced program last year. She had to get the interview through the ASA fair. Wondering if you are going to be more open to IMGs this year.
 
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@coolfay93 ,

Whereas I do not have insight into our final rank list process for the match, I can speak to my experiences within the program since I've been there. We have not tended to shy away in any way from IMG residents, historically, we have primarily ranked based on who we think would be a good fit within the program. We have multiple IMG residents currently in our program that truly excel in every aspect of being a resident anesthesiologist, and I think they significantly strengthen our program. In fact, the two classes prior to my own had an IMG resident as chief residents.
In regards to the ASA program fair, we very much look forward to that opportunity each year to not only showcase what our program has to offer, but also to meet prospective applicants and make sure we haven't missed anyone that we'd be interested in interviewing/getting to know further. Myself, along with some faculty, the PD, and other residents will be at the ASA fair this year and cannot wait for the opportunity to meet applicants and tell them about our program. I strongly encourage anyone interested in Temple to stop by if you have the chance!
 

NVO

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What is this "Urban-based" categorical year that I see on ERAS?
 
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What is this "Urban-based" categorical year that I see on ERAS?
We use the term "urban based" clinical base year to reflect what we see as the benefits in doing your clinical base year (and all of residency) at an urban, safety-net hospital. Beyond being a safety-net hospital, we are destination care for many advanced types of illnesses. You will be exposed to significant amounts of advanced pathology in most patients, as many of our patients are not receiving adequate preventative medicine. We are also a very busy level one trauma center with significant exposure to penetrating as well as blunt trauma. Further, in serving as a large academic center in an urban environment, we receive patients from a large geographic area, providing opportunities to treat patients from many different backgrounds.
 

Diamond0227

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Hi Everyone!
Temple anesthesia chief residents here. We wanted to open up a thread to tell you about our program, as well as answer any questions that you may have.

Temple University Hospital is a major academic center that performs a wide variety of cases in every surgical discipline. Collectively, the Temple Health System performs >12,000 inpatient surgeries and nearly 17,000 outpatient surgeries annually. Our clinical training primarily takes place at Temple University Hospital (TUH); a 722-bed tertiary care center situated in North Philadelphia. Temple University Hospital is the ‘safety net’ hospital to many in underserved patients in our community, while at the same time, it has earned the distinction of being destination care for many complex acute medical and surgical conditions. We enjoy a robust cardiac surgery service. Temple is the #1 lung transplant center by volume for the past 2 consecutive years and is a national leader in performing pulmonary thromboendarterectomies. With 335 annual solid-organ transplants annually, the anesthesia residents are exposed early to complex cases with high acuity including heart, lung, kidney, and liver transplants. Additionally, as a level 1 Trauma Center, our anesthesiology residents quickly become adept at resuscitation of critically ill trauma patients involving massive transfusion protocol. Our busy obstetric floor averages >2,600 births annually providing excellent obstetric anesthesia exposure. A busy orthopedic, vascular, and general surgery department allow significant exposure to regional anesthesia, and our residents perform many regional blocks for both intraoperative anesthetic and postoperative pain management. Pediatric rotations occur at the top-ranking Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) during CA-2 year, and St. Christopher’s Children’s Hospital during CA-3 year. Several elective rotations are offered to our CA-3 residents including multiple international electives in Kijabe Kenya, Addis Ababa Ethiopia, and Kigali Rwanda.
Our recently revamped didactic curriculum has greatly benefited our residents with a 100% board pass rate since changes have taken effect. The education program begins in the CA 1 year with an intensive one-month orientation program. Throughout the CA-1 year, a series of brief online lectures focused on ABA keywords provides complete exposure to the curriculum for the Basic Exam. Every Tuesday, residents of each class participate in a half-day didactic, simulation, or oral board/OSCE preparation activity, and several of our faculty have served as oral board examiners for the national exam. Our state-of-the-art simulation center at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine provides every opportunity to hone our clinical skills in a simulation environment including becoming oriented and adept at acquiring and recognizing standard basic echocardiographic views on the recently purchased an interactive transesophageal and transthoracic echo simulation model.
Every academic year, residents are given a two-week research block to pursue quality improvement or research interests, and residents are encouraged early in the CA-1 year to work on case reports for presentation at the ASA annual meeting. Participation at other regional and national anesthesia meetings is also supported and encouraged. The department subsidizes travel to these meetings for residents who are presenting authors. Last year we have sent residents to the ASA, SCA, SOAP, and ASRA annual meetings.
Our residents have demonstrated a propensity for leadership and success through various appointments on national, state, and hospital-wide councils, and our graduates have matched to many prestigious fellowships in every subspecialty (OB, acute pain, chronic pain, cardiothoracic, critical care). We feel that when you graduate from Temple’s anesthesiology residency, your clinical training will be second to none and you will be well positioned to pursue fellowship opportunities, take academic appointments, or join private practice.


We hope that our passion for the training offered at Temple is apparent, and we would be happy to answer any question you may have.
Does temple's residency have support or initiatives to recruit under represented minority populations?
 

TempleChairman

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This is the best ad for your program:

Do you still have the same chair? If not, why?

I have just now stumbled across this thread (I actually did not know that our Chief's were posting - nice work you two!) and thought that I should chime in. Yes - I am still at Temple and as busy as ever. My apologies for not posting to my original thread recently. It was intended as a Q&A forum. As there have been no Q's recently, I have not posted any A's.

As always, if any medical students have questions about the match, the specialty, or careers in medicine in general please do not hesitate to ask (or skim through the thread referenced above by FFP). That is often the best way to obtain answers.
 
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