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May 4, 2016
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What are the requirements to work in the ED?
Considering a career in the Medical field. I know there are different positions in the ED.

Looking for some guidance from those who have been in my position. Explain...

May respond to address any of the following topics:
  • Duration of preparation
  • Courses (Med-School) & Required Exams
  • Tuition / Student Loans
  • Work salary earned in the ED (Estimate)
  • Available positions that involve working with patients
  • Responsibilities of the (Surgeon, Nurse, anything else?)
  • Levels
  • What do you have to during a typical work day?

I watch Chicago Med and similar Doctors shows. That's how I've learned about the field.
 
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eteshoe

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What are the basic requirements studies?
I have Googled, and am considering a career in the Medical field. I know there are different positions in the ED. I think you can probably explain it better:

- Years
- Studies
- Tuition Budget
- Salary
- Positions / Responsibilities
- Typical Day

I watch Chicago Med and similar shows.
Stop.

Finish college, take your MCAT, get into med school THEN worry about specialties.
 
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eteshoe

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Might as well add Grey's Anatomy since for some reason that version of Seattle attracts almost every possible disaster and ensuing emergency situation
 
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May 4, 2016
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Just asking for some of your ED expertise. As you all in this forum are probably familiar with the field more than I am.
 
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TheOther

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What are the basic requirements studies?
I have Googled, and am considering a career in the Medical field. I know there are different positions in the ED. I think you can probably explain it better:

- Years
- Studies
- Tuition Budget
- Salary
- Positions / Responsibilities
- Typical Day

I watch Chicago Med and similar shows.
I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you're not a troll - who knows, maybe you're 14 years old or a Saudi Arabian prince with English as your second language...or both.

To be an emergency physician, you need:
4 years of undergraduate studies
4 years of medical school
3-4 years of EM residency

Tuition ranges from 200-350k ish for med school, which can balloon higher during residency.
Salary ranges - depends on setting and set up.
Positions/Responsibilities and typical day - there are plenty of resources hashing this out
 

gutonc

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I think the other part of the question is, about what other people (besides docs) work in the ED.
Nurse - go to nursing school
Pharmacist - go to Pharmacy school
Tech - Go to paramedic school (making this up...I have no idea actually)
Clerk - Graduate from high school
 
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May 4, 2016
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There you go again underestimating me. I was not aware I had to concentrate on my grammar.
FYI: I am way older, you really think a 14 year old would care about a career? At least I don't...
Since you are discriminating: No I am not Arabian and not even near. According to Science humans are all related.
English is my 1st language, I speak Spanish, and ASL. Know some French and learning Italian.

If you don't like the question don't respond nor try to offend.
 
Last edited:
May 4, 2016
52
3
Might as well add Grey's Anatomy since for some reason that version of Seattle attracts almost every possible disaster and ensuing emergency situation
I watch Grey's Anatomy, although I didn't mention this show because it's not completely accurate. Chicago Med shows the medical life more than Grey's Anatomy. Shonda Rhimes is very creative.
 
Last edited:
May 4, 2016
52
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Emergency human, dental, or veterinary medicine?
I was referring to Human in this post as in a Hospital. Considering Veterinary Emergency as well but for that I know it's Veterinarian and Technician.

I'd like to make a difference and do good.
 
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racerwad

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There you go again underestimating me. I was not aware I had to concentrate on my grammar.
FYI: I am way older, you really think a 14 year old would care about a career? At least I don't...
Since you are discriminating: No I am not Arabian and not even near. According to Science humans are all related.
English is my 1st language, I speak Spanish, and ASL. Know some French and learning Italian.

If you don't like the question don't respond nor try to offend.
This website is based upon communicating ideas using the written word. Therefore, sharing your thoughts accurately does, in fact, require that you concentrate on your grammar. Otherwise, everyone assumes that you are trolling, non-English, etc, etc.

Anyhow, you sound like someone who is writing a post for one of those absurd "how do I' websites that purport to outline a path to something (changing your oil, getting a degree, becoming an astronaut) in the most rudimentary way imaginable.

I still think @Angry Birds is spot on with their recommendation of Scrubs vs Chicago Med. Totally accurate.
 
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I have watched a few episodes of Scrubs and House. I'm asking not sharing my thoughts.. Where is the grammar error Professor?

I am only asking what I need and is required. How to get there if you want to go with the "How do I". Like you all didn't have to ask How? when starting out in a new world...
 

Angry Birds

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OP -- thanks for clarifying. Just wanted to make sure you're serious. Since you've watched Scrubs, I would just volunteer at the local hospital ER. Bring your own scrubs and white coat though, and just ask the ER if you can help out, and that you've watched Scrubs and Chicago Med, so you have an idea of things.

Best experience next to Scrubs is to just jump into things right away. Hands on experience.

Good luck ! Let us know how it goes.
 

gro2001

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What are the basic requirements / studies?
Considering a career in the Medical field. I know there are different positions in the ED. I think you can probably explain / guide me better:

Respond about any of the following:
- Duration of preparation
- Studies and exams required
- Tuition / Student Loans
- Work Salary
- Positions / Responsibilities (Surgeon, Nurse, anything else?)
- Levels
- What you have to do in a typical day?

I watch Chicago Med and similar Doctors shows.
I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt.

- Duration of preparation: becoming an Emergency Physician in the US typically requires 4 years of college (during which you have to take certain pre-requisite courses such as a couple of semesters each of chemistry, physics, biology, organic chemistry; otherwise your major can be more or less whatever you want), 4 years of medical school, and then residency training in Emergency Medicine (which can be either 3 or 4 years long depending on the program). After that you are an Emergency Medicine Attending Physician (also known as EM physician, ED doc, ER doc, etc). So a total of 11-12 years.

- Studies and exams required: Not sure what you mean by 'studies'. If you mean what educational background is required, see the answer above. In terms of exams, it's fairly similar to that of every other US doctor:
  • SAT to get into college
  • MCAT to get into medical school
  • USMLE step I
  • USMLE step II CK
  • USMLE step II CS
  • USMLE step III
  • +/- NBME shelf exams for every clerkship in medical school
  • ABEM ITE every year during residency
  • ABEM written board exam
  • ABEM oral board exam
  • Small ABEM re-certification exam every year after that
  • Big ABEM re-certification exam every 10 years after that

- Tuition / Student Loans: varies highly by your choice of school, whether you get in-state tuition, how much your parents/spouse help you, etc. It is not uncommon to graduate with >$200,000 of debt. Some people manage to graduate debt free. One way to do that (if you are a US citizen and not independently wealthy) is to take a scholarship from the US military.

- Work Salary: varies highly based on location, hours worked, and other factors that are too detailed to go into at this stage of the game. Suffice to say that most EM docs' annual income from clinical practice will fall in the $200,000 - $300,000 range.

- Positions / Responsibilities (Surgeon, Nurse, anything else?): Surgeons don't typically work in the ER except when we call them to consult on a patient. There are lots of people working in the ER, but I assume you are not inquiring about janitors, A/C repairmen, security guards, etc, but are asking about who gets to work in the ER clinically. In which case, most commonly it is:
  • EM physicians: they evaluate patients, make decisions on medical care, perform emergent procedures, prescribe medications, and do a lot of paperwork.
  • Nurses: in addition to performing their own, independent evaluation of patients, they provide most of the actual care ordered by the physicians. They administer most medications, assist patients, etc. They are also in charge of triage, which is a process by which the ER sorts out who gets seen first. More senior also often take on other non clinical leadership positions (think management).
  • Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants: are so called 'midlevel providers'. They are typically used as 'physician extenders' in the sense that they see a patient independently from the physician who has to provide some supervision (which varies widely by hospital from having the physician also see each patient seen by an NP/PA to having them only sign some of the charts). These providers can do a lot if not all of the stuff EM physicians do, depending on what the hospital, state, their supervising physician, and their malpractice insurance allows them to do (all of these are highly variable).
- Levels: I assume you mean levels of training? While you are in residency, you are an EM resident. Once you graduate residency, you are an EM attending. Unlike some other countries, there is no title to distinguish senior vs junior attendings (such as the UK's specialist vs consultant). If you work in an academic medical center (ER that's part of a university hospital) you will often have a separate, academic title that can range from instructor to professor.

- What you have to do in a typical day? In a sense every day is exactly the same, but the specifics of what patients show up and what you need to do for them varies. A typical day may be:
  • show up to the ER shortly before your shift begins
  • take sign out from the doc who is leaving (he tells you about any patients that are in the ER that are going to be under your care)
  • see some patients with belly pain, some with headache, some with chest pain, some vomiting, some with a fever or whatever come through the door (emphasized because that is the entire point)
  • decide what needs to be done for them (medications, procedures, admit to hospital, discharge to go home)
  • deal with a life-or-death emergency that rolls through the door
  • if you are lucky, inhale a sandwich
  • if you are in an academic medical center, teach some residents or medical students something
  • do lots of paperwork
  • sign out to the doc coming to relieve you at the end of your 8, 10 or 12 hour shift
  • go home
 

bashwell

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OP, as far as shows go, not that they're perfect by any means, but it'd be better to watch documentary or reality type shows like Boston Med or ER: Life and Death at Vancouver General Hospital, or Code Black the documentary, not the tv show.
 
D

deleted245139

I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt.

- Duration of preparation: becoming an Emergency Physician in the US typically requires 4 years of college (during which you have to take certain pre-requisite courses such as a couple of semesters each of chemistry, physics, biology, organic chemistry; otherwise your major can be more or less whatever you want), 4 years of medical school, and then residency training in Emergency Medicine (which can be either 3 or 4 years long depending on the program). After that you are an Emergency Medicine Attending Physician (also known as EM physician, ED doc, ER doc, etc). So a total of 11-12 years.

- Studies and exams required: Not sure what you mean by 'studies'. If you mean what educational background is required, see the answer above. In terms of exams, it's fairly similar to that of every other US doctor:
  • SAT to get into college
  • MCAT to get into medical school
  • USMLE step I
  • USMLE step II CK
  • USMLE step II CS
  • USMLE step III
  • +/- NBME shelf exams for every clerkship in medical school
  • ABEM ITE every year during residency
  • ABEM written board exam
  • ABEM oral board exam
  • Small ABEM re-certification exam every year after that
  • Big ABEM re-certification exam every 10 years after that

- Tuition / Student Loans: varies highly by your choice of school, whether you get in-state tuition, how much your parents/spouse help you, etc. It is not uncommon to graduate with >$200,000 of debt. Some people manage to graduate debt free. One way to do that (if you are a US citizen and not independently wealthy) is to take a scholarship from the US military.

- Work Salary: varies highly based on location, hours worked, and other factors that are too detailed to go into at this stage of the game. Suffice to say that most EM docs' annual income from clinical practice will fall in the $200,000 - $300,000 range.

- Positions / Responsibilities (Surgeon, Nurse, anything else?): Surgeons don't typically work in the ER except when we call them to consult on a patient. There are lots of people working in the ER, but I assume you are not inquiring about janitors, A/C repairmen, security guards, etc, but are asking about who gets to work in the ER clinically. In which case, most commonly it is:
  • EM physicians: they evaluate patients, make decisions on medical care, perform emergent procedures, prescribe medications, and do a lot of paperwork.
  • Nurses: in addition to performing their own, independent evaluation of patients, they provide most of the actual care ordered by the physicians. They administer most medications, assist patients, etc. They are also in charge of triage, which is a process by which the ER sorts out who gets seen first. More senior also often take on other non clinical leadership positions (think management).
  • Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants: are so called 'midlevel providers'. They are typically used as 'physician extenders' in the sense that they see a patient independently from the physician who has to provide some supervision (which varies widely by hospital from having the physician also see each patient seen by an NP/PA to having them only sign some of the charts). These providers can do a lot if not all of the stuff EM physicians do, depending on what the hospital, state, their supervising physician, and their malpractice insurance allows them to do (all of these are highly variable).
- Levels: I assume you mean levels of training? While you are in residency, you are an EM resident. Once you graduate residency, you are an EM attending. Unlike some other countries, there is no title to distinguish senior vs junior attendings (such as the UK's specialist vs consultant). If you work in an academic medical center (ER that's part of a university hospital) you will often have a separate, academic title that can range from instructor to professor.

- What you have to do in a typical day? In a sense every day is exactly the same, but the specifics of what patients show up and what you need to do for them varies. A typical day may be:
  • show up to the ER shortly before your shift begins
  • take sign out from the doc who is leaving (he tells you about any patients that are in the ER that are going to be under your care)
  • see some patients with belly pain, some with headache, some with chest pain, some vomiting, some with a fever or whatever come through the door (emphasized because that is the entire point)
  • decide what needs to be done for them (medications, procedures, admit to hospital, discharge to go home)
  • deal with a life-or-death emergency that rolls through the door
  • if you are lucky, inhale a sandwich
  • if you are in an academic medical center, teach some residents or medical students something
  • do lots of paperwork
  • sign out to the doc coming to relieve you at the end of your 8, 10 or 12 hour shift
  • go home
You should post this in HsSDN, well written and comprehensive, and would cover what the need to know. A nice primer!
 
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TheOther

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There you go again underestimating me. I was not aware I had to concentrate on my grammar.
FYI: I am way older, you really think a 14 year old would care about a career? At least I don't...
Since you are discriminating: No I am not Arabian and not even near. According to Science humans are all related.
English is my 1st language, I speak Spanish, and ASL. Know some French and learning Italian.

If you don't like the question don't respond nor try to offend.
If you don't know how to do your own research and figure out what it takes to become an emergency physician, I assumed you were either a young kid or didn't have the advantage of English being your primary language. This is not discrimination - it is an honest interpretation. Since you insist that you are neither - I don't know what else to say. If you haven't gone to college yet, go to college. Get connected with an adviser. Volunteer at a hospital in your local ED.
 
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DeadCactus

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You want people to distill a book's worth of knowledge and spoon feed it to you while being too lazy to use proper grammar or form a clear, focused questions...
 
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May 4, 2016
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You want people to distill a book's worth of knowledge and spoon feed it to you while being too lazy to use proper grammar or form a clear, focused questions...
I'm not asking for knowledge just guidance. Why are some of you attacking me? I'm not your resident. I used proper grammar, you are the ones that either don't feel like answering or just want to create a fight. In person you probably wouldn't respond like that. Use your keyboard to write with kindness and not destroy others. Have a great day either way!

Talk about saving lives, I expected a better attitude.
 
May 4, 2016
52
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If you don't know how to do your own research and figure out what it takes to become an emergency physician, I assumed you were either a young kid or didn't have the advantage of English being your primary language. This is not discrimination - it is an honest interpretation. Since you insist that you are neither - I don't know what else to say. If you haven't gone to college yet, go to college. Get connected with an adviser. Volunteer at a hospital in your local ED.
I'm great at researching & highly tech-savyy. I asked because I love this forum believe it or not. The responses arrive quickly and believe I can receive better suggestions and answers from actual Doctors and Nurses.

Why are you trying to make me feel inferior? Is this to inflate your ego to feel superior? Sounds like Donald Trump.
I always have spoken English and other languages. I am hardworking as well but all of those insinuations are off topic which is why I replied to you. Probably should have ignored and taken the high road.
 
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HoosierdaddyO

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I'm great at researching & highly tech-savyy. I asked because I love this forum believe it or not. The responses arrive quickly and believe I can get better suggestions and answers from actual Doctors and Nurses.

Why are you trying to make me feel inferior? Is this to inflate your ego to feel superior? Sounds like Donald Trump.
I always have spoken English and other languages. I am hardworking as well but all of those insinuations are off topic which is why I replied to you. Probably should have ignored and taken the high road.
I was going to offer advice until you bashed the Teflon don :/
 
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GimpGenius

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Not bashing, trying to avoid cyberbullying.
If you consider these responses bullying, you'll want to work on your mental resiliency to work any position in an ED. Thick skin is an absolute must. Having a reasonably dark sense of humor and being able to have off color conversations is a plus. Remember, you'll finish a code, eat birthday cake, then manually disimpact a morbidly obese patient with end stage fibromyalgia back to back to back.

I highly recommend cake before the disimpaction, by the way. #themoreyoukmow
 
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Let's focus on what the post is about.

Not all the responses, only the ones off topic questioning me with discrimintating comments. It may be funny but it can also be disrespectful to the variety of people in this world. People come in all shape and sizes. No one is born knowing, we learn everything from walking and speaking.

I'm a great person, smart and capable of accomplishing great things!
 

gutonc

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Let's focus on what the post is about.
Could you actually clarify what the post is about? Do you want to be an ER doc? An ER tech? An ER clerk? Give us some useful information FFS.
 

racerwad

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Let's focus on what the post is about.

Not all the responses, only the ones off topic questioning me with discrimintating comments. It may be funny but it can also be disrespectful to the variety of people in this world. People come in all shape and sizes. No one is born knowing, we learn everything from walking and speaking.

I'm a great person, smart and capable of accomplishing great things!
What else do you want to know? @TheOther and @gro2001 answered your question to the fullest extent imaginable. Do you need one of us to fill out your FAFSA and college application?
 
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Whether you feel @FLVettrain's questions were justified or not, I'm troubled by the type of response he received. This is a forum that is broadly entitled "Emergency Medicine" and we should expect questions of all kinds, even those that some of you consider asinine. We should also welcome all those who take an interest in our great field and treat them respectfully.
 
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Angry Birds

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Whether you feel @FLVettrain's questions were justified or not, I'm troubled by the type of response he received. This is a forum that is broadly entitled "Emergency Medicine" and we should expect questions of all kinds, even those that some of you consider asinine. We should also welcome all those who take an interest in our great field and treat them respectfully.
Sock puppet account.
 

racerwad

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Whether you feel @FLVettrain's questions were justified or not, I'm troubled by the type of response he received. This is a forum that is broadly entitled "Emergency Medicine" and we should expect questions of all kinds, even those that some of you consider asinine. We should also welcome all those who take an interest in our great field and treat them respectfully.
It is also a Physician/Resident sub-forum; there is the pre-med forum for questions about "how do I get from here to there?".

The honest reality is that there are dumb questions. If the OP didn't know how to become an "ER" doc by watching high quality television, how can we mere mortals be expected to help?
 
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Apollyon

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Whether you feel @FLVettrain's questions were justified or not, I'm troubled by the type of response he received. This is a forum that is broadly entitled "Emergency Medicine" and we should expect questions of all kinds, even those that some of you consider asinine. We should also welcome all those who take an interest in our great field and treat them respectfully.
SDN is made up of all of us who post here. You registered more than 6 months ago, and this is your second post. You haven't given much (and I didn't see your first post, so you might not have given at all). This board is made up of people giving. Various opinions of various quality build up a volume; certain posters, by what they post, let others know what is their educational bent and their personality. Some people are academic, others are more "where the rubber meets the road", but we all show what we have/know, and it is shown more by the more we post. It disheartens me when people post "long time lurker, first time poster", because that means they have only taken, and given nothing. This person asks a question that smacks of rank novice status, but asks questions that even a cursory effort would reveal the answers. Why would anyone give time to another that would ask the first to do their work for them? And, then, to compound on it, that the person asking the questions tells everyone how "good" they are ("I'm great at researching & highly tech-savyy"), and says they should have taken "the high road" (insulting the lot of us, as this person says they are better than us). Your addition would hold more gravitas if we knew ANYTHING about you.
 
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Who I am should have nothing to do with how one-time or habitual posters are treated in this forum. If I happen to log on to SDN, infrequent as it may be, and see responses that smack of arrogance from people in my own field, I have no hesitation about chiming in. I respect this forum but believe both naive and more educated questions should be tolerated here. And as physicians, let's at least pretend to take the higher road, even if the poster is for some, obtuse.
 
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DeadCactus

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I'm not asking for knowledge just guidance. Why are some of you attacking me? I'm not your resident. I used proper grammar, you are the ones that either don't feel like answering or just want to create a fight. In person you probably wouldn't respond like that. Use your keyboard to write with kindness and not destroy others. Have a great day either way!

Talk about saving lives, I expected a better attitude.
So in-person you would walk into a room full of strangers and say "I watched a TV medical show and it really got me thinking about being in medicine. Could you please tell me all about how to work in the ER including the training requirements, finances, lifestyle, testing, and typical day of every role I could possibly fill in an ER?"

I'd wager that my response on the internet is a hell of a lot more true to life than your behavior on the internet.
 
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So in-person you would walk into a room full of strangers and say "I watched a TV medical show and it really got me thinking about being in medicine. Could you please tell me all about how to work in the ER including the training requirements, finances, lifestyle, testing, and typical day of every role I could possibly fill in an ER?"

I'd wager that my response on the internet is a hell of a lot more true to life than your behavior on the internet.
I was the one being attacked. No in a different scenario, not walking into a room full of strangers. I wouldn't mention the TV shows. I just would mention to help with my question.

Will not continue trying to make my point, as I have noticed the members with 2+ years / 7+ years say whatever they wish since they rule the forums and get to treat the newbies coldly while backing each other.
 

TheOther

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I was the one being attacked. No in a different scenario, not walking into a room full of strangers. I wouldn't mention the TV shows. I just would mention to help with my question.

Will not continue trying to make my point, as I have noticed the members with 2+ years / 7+ years say whatever they wish since they rule the forums and get to treat the newbies coldly while backing each other.
Aside from the (small) part of my response that you took offense to, both @gro2001 and I took the time to write you thorough and concise responses to your questions - and there wasn't a SINGLE thank you or follow-up for clarification/further understanding. Instead, you focus on being defensive and victimizing yourself rather than providing thoughtful, genuine interest. To be honest, this makes it seem like you're not even serious about looking for answers concerning EM.
 

Angry Birds

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I watched Big Bang Theory so I think I'm halfway to being an astrophysicist.

I mean, seriously, imagine going to a forum of astrophysicists and saying you've watched Big Bang Theory and now you want to be an astrophysicist. You'd be laughed out.
 
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gro2001

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I watched Big Bang Theory so I think I'm halfway to being an astrophysicist.

I mean, seriously, imagine going to a forum of astrophysicists and saying you've watched Big Bang Theory and now you want to be an astrophysicist. You'd be laughed out.
I don't know... I definitely remember the show ER making me interested in the idea of Emergency Medicine. I think you guys are giving this guy/gal too much of a hard time for that comment. It is common and normal for TV shows to influence the public's view of jobs they would otherwise not have much knowledge on. You think no kid ever decided they wanted to be a cop after watching Hawaii 5-0?


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Angry Birds

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I don't know... I definitely remember the show ER making me interested in the idea of Emergency Medicine. I think you guys are giving this guy/gal too much of a hard time for that comment. It is common and normal for TV shows to influence the public's view of jobs they would otherwise not have much knowledge on. You think no kid ever decided they wanted to be a cop after watching Hawaii 5-0?


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I don't doubt that TV has a role to play. Our specialty got a huge boost from the show "ER." But still, one imagines this phenomenon to be a much more subtle process. I can't see myself watching a show like Big Bang and then mentioning that to a bunch of astrophysicists as if this makes me even somewhat remotely aware of what their field entails. I think there are a lot of steps in between that the OP just jumped over, which would have all been fine had he not mentioned the line about watching Chicago Med or whatever.
 
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