What happens when you/your wife is about to give birth?

mentos

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If you're a pregnant pharmacist (or if you're a male Rph and your wife is pregnant) and the due date is in 2 weeks... what happens if the water breaks and you have to go to work in 3 hours? Or if it happens in the middle of a shift? You can't just leave the pharmacy. In a normal job you can call out sick, but not at CVS or Wags.
 

trailerpark

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If your not at work call your DM and say your not coming in. If your at work call your Partner to come in and if they won't or can't call your DM and close the pharmacy and go. If there's waiters take care of them if it's almost done, if not give rx back.


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BidingMyTime

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If its the woman who is in labor, then she would have to close up the pharmacy (or if possible, since labor often starts off slow, work until a back-up pharmacist arrives.) If she isn't at work, then the pharmacy wouldn't open until the back-up pharmacist arrives to open it (or the pharmacist already on duty will have to stay over until the back-up pharmacist arrives.) If you are the dad, than its expected that you would work until the back-up pharmacist arrives. Ideally you should have the number of your supervisor, and the number of 1 or more pharmacists who would be able to fill in on short notice--call your supervisor and back-up pharmacist ASAP after labor starts.
 

farmadiazepine

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Are you kidding me? You close the pharmacy due to an emergency. That's it. You are not going to have your water break and work until a "back up" pharmacist comes in. Give me a break. Close, that's it.

You can call your DM and tell them your on the way to the hospital and the pharmacy is closed. Let them find someone to come in.
 

BidingMyTime

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How many of you people have actually had babies? Labor seldom starts with the water breaking, instead the mother will have contractions for quite some time before (if its a first baby, even for hours before)--when the contractions start they are usually pretty far apart, say 15 - 20 minutes, if she goes to the hospital at this point she will be sent home. Obviously, there are exceptions, but for many women, labor will start with just a few contractions/hour, this is the point when she should be calling for back-up and will be quite capable of working until the back-up arrives in most instances.
 

ldiot

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Follow workstation assignment board at all costs!!! Closing the pharmacy may result in penalties up to and including termination.
 

awval999

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If you're a pregnant pharmacist (or if you're a male Rph and your wife is pregnant) and the due date is in 2 weeks... what happens if the water breaks and you have to go to work in 3 hours? Or if it happens in the middle of a shift? You can't just leave the pharmacy. In a normal job you can call out sick, but not at CVS or Wags.
I assure you, yes, you can.

Actually, just call 911 and say you're in labor and you need the ambulance. That's even better.
 

gwarm01

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How would you handle this if you were working at an inpatient pharmacy and we're the only pharmacist on duty?
 

confettiflyer

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Why are y'all making this so difficult?

No employer is willing to take the PR hit for terminating an employee in this situation. Look around folks, it isn't 1955 anymore.
But everyone knows it's only a PR hit/media sensation if it's an attractive white female.

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rl123

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when I was a student on rotations, the pharmacist was legit 8.99 months pregnant and every so often she would start exhaling very sharply and clutching the table. she started calling around for coverage, and couple hours later a floater came in to relieve her and she started her maternity leave

I htink it was one of those situations where she felt the pressure to work until the last possible moment in order to maximize her leave
(note: this was YEARS ago... hopefully things have changed)
 

abdc

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I'm the exception I guess. I didn't even know I was in labor until well after my water broke. When I finally decided to go to the hospital i was well into active labor.
 

gwarm01

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Call the director/manager on duty...and leave.
I work weekends at a hospital where you are the only pharmacist on duty. No manager, just you. This place is good about having things in the Pyxis and they let nurses pull things before pharmacist verification (by necessity since it isn't a 24 hour pharmacy), so you could probably bail without too much trouble.
 

confettiflyer

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I work weekends at a hospital where you are the only pharmacist on duty. No manager, just you. This place is good about having things in the Pyxis and they let nurses pull things before pharmacist verification (by necessity since it isn't a 24 hour pharmacy), so you could probably bail without too much trouble.
I think the operative word would be "manager-on-call" not on duty. That's what I would do in that situation, luckily you have nine months to plan ahead, if they really need you to work they can put you on day shift which is easier to cover.
 

BidingMyTime

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How would you handle this if you were working at an inpatient pharmacy and we're the only pharmacist on duty?
Surely you would have some sort of emergency procedure in place? In our hospital, the house supervisor has a keycard to the pharmacy, and can enter the pharmacy and remove drugs in the event of an emergency (there is a documentation form s/he would have to fill out in this event, and there are rules like s/he can't remove IV drugs that would have to be diluted before given, s/he would have to mix them in the pharmacy) Because pretty much everything that conceivably would be needed is in the omnicell/pyxis or crash cart (and the house supervisor would first go to another unit to get a needed drug from an omnicell/pyxis/crash cart if it were not available or had been depleted from one unit), it would be extremely rare for a such a confluence of events to occur--ie the pharmacist on duty had to close the pharmacy due to a medical emergency and then a flux of new admissions depleted some needed drug out of all the omnicells/pyxis/crashcarts in the entire hospital, etc. But there is a policy, just in case. Most likely your pharmacy has a similar policy, you just don't know about it, because its never had to be used--if not, you should have such a policy.
 

ldiot

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If you are 9 months pregnant you should have a backup pharmacist or the manager on standby. I can't imagine that this would be an issue; it's in everyone's best interest to have a pharmacist in the pharmacy.
 

confettiflyer

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This would fall under medical emergency and every hospital has a policy, as stated above. Usually it's a house coordinator or supervisor with emergency pharmacy key access. I mean, hospitals have gotten by without pharmacy 24/7 for decades...

That said, if in this situation (full term pregnancy coming to an end), it's pretty much a failure to plan if you have to activate the plan. I can understand if it's like a preemie situation, but I'd put 100% of the blame on management for that one.

If it's a spouse? Then I'd blame the pharmacist for not at least putting them on notice for the 1-2 weeks leading up to the birth. Night shifter? Schedule some vacation around the birth.

I mean, I don't even think this is an issue in the real world, someone correct me if I'm wrong. We've handled all sorts of staff or staff spouse pregnancy situations and have never come close to "omg gotta close the pharmacy."
 

BidingMyTime

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I mean, I don't even think this is an issue in the real world, someone correct me if I'm wrong. We've handled all sorts of staff or staff spouse pregnancy situations and have never come close to "omg gotta close the pharmacy."
This. I've been working retail and/or hospital for close to 30 years, birthed 5 babies myself, and have never seen the situation where a pharmacy had to close because of a female pharmacist going into labor. Babies don't just suddenly appear, generally people know well in advance approximately when to expect the baby, and even in the case of premature labor, it starts with usually far enough apart contractions that there is time to call someone in. Most people (at least outside of CA) live within an hour or less of where they work and a back-up person can usually be in pretty quick in a true emergency.
 

BidingMyTime

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duplicate post, but I'll add something else....

especially in the case with a first child, there is little reason to start maternity leave early. First, changes are the child will be past its due date, especially with first children and 2nd it just makes the last 2 weeks or pregnancy even longer and more dragged out than they already are. I found it best to work up until I went into labor (and that never happened at work, labor does usually tend to start in the evening/night.) It maximizes the time spent recuperating from labor (which especially with first labors is needed) and its keeps ones mind preoccupied so the last weeks or pregnancy go quicker.
 
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confettiflyer

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duplicate post, but I'll add something else....

especially in the case with a first child, there is little reason to start maternity leave early. First, changes are the child will be past its due date, especially with first children and 2nd it just makes the last 2 weeks or pregnancy even longer and more dragged out than they already are. I found it best to work up until I went into labor (and that never happened at work, labor does usually tend to start in the evening/night.) It maximizes the time spent recuperating from labor (which especially with first labors is needed) and its keeps ones mind preoccupied so the last weeks or pregnancy go quicker.
It's funny because of the last 4 pregnancies at work (pharmacy and a few nurses I know), this was the case 1/4 times.

Just goes to show how different pregnancies go, but we've been doing this a long time...(gasp) the hospital didn't need to close! Haha


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sakigt

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My partner went into labor 30 minutes before her shift ended. At least she was already at the hospital.

If it were me Id have a backup call in plan. We have a system so Id call the other campus to switch on my view and have a nice night. Have the tech redirect calls to them. Bye Felicia

Talk with your wifes OB about what to do. Usually youll have time to get things in order before you leave. Make sure wifey has her emergency bag packed and on her person. That includes doctors visits especially towards the end.
 

ChalupaBatman86

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Surely you would have some sort of emergency procedure in place? In our hospital, the house supervisor has a keycard to the pharmacy, and can enter the pharmacy and remove drugs in the event of an emergency (there is a documentation form s/he would have to fill out in this event, and there are rules like s/he can't remove IV drugs that would have to be diluted before given, s/he would have to mix them in the pharmacy) Because pretty much everything that conceivably would be needed is in the omnicell/pyxis or crash cart (and the house supervisor would first go to another unit to get a needed drug from an omnicell/pyxis/crash cart if it were not available or had been depleted from one unit), it would be extremely rare for a such a confluence of events to occur--ie the pharmacist on duty had to close the pharmacy due to a medical emergency and then a flux of new admissions depleted some needed drug out of all the omnicells/pyxis/crashcarts in the entire hospital, etc. But there is a policy, just in case. Most likely your pharmacy has a similar policy, you just don't know about it, because its never had to be used--if not, you should have such a policy.
I wouldn't. And don't call me Shirley.
 

ldiot

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Unless of course a customer would complain..
View attachment 207732
Wow if I ever got an email as nasty as that I would be sending out job applications before my shift has ended.

Does he think that threatening techs who make minimum wage is an effective way to get them to work harder for him? Did he think that making every PIC that he deals with hate him was a good idea? All this kind of crap does is kill moral which in turn kills productivity and customer service. He is grossly incompetent.
 
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Dred Pirate

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Wow if I ever got an email as nasty as that I would be sending out job applications before my shift has ended.

Does he think that threatening techs who make minimum wage is an effective way to get them to work harder for him? Did he think that making every PIC that he deals with hate him was a good idea? All this kind of crap does is kill moral which in turn kills productivity and customer service. He is grossly incompetent.
and that is why they all started looking for other jobs stat. They did fire several Rph's around this time.
 
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How many of you people have actually had babies? Labor seldom starts with the water breaking, instead the mother will have contractions for quite some time before (if its a first baby, even for hours before)--when the contractions start they are usually pretty far apart, say 15 - 20 minutes, if she goes to the hospital at this point she will be sent home. Obviously, there are exceptions, but for many women, labor will start with just a few contractions/hour, this is the point when she should be calling for back-up and will be quite capable of working until the back-up arrives in most instances.

I was already in intense labour when my water broke, I had my baby less than five minutes later. Labor comes differently for everyone. I only had back pain which I thought was normal till it went crazy, had the baby a little later. My husband dropped me but had to park the car cos he had packed in front and left the doors open, he missed the birth. Labor happens differently for everyone.
 

ABCPharmD

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Unless of course a customer would complain..
View attachment 207732
Definitely would've been fired yesterday under this policy. A customer complained to store management because I said the medication name during the consultation (in her words loudly screamed the medication name) and I helped the person at the other consultation window before her. I didn't get fired but had a nice 15 minute conversation with the customer service supervisor. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ just doing my job.
 

Dred Pirate

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Definitely would've been fired yesterday under this policy. A customer complained to store management because I said the medication name during the consultation (in her words loudly screamed the medication name) and I helped the person at the other consultation window before her. I didn't get fired but had a nice 15 minute conversation with the customer service supervisor. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ just doing my job.
unless you work for CVS in Raleigh NC you are safe - at least from barefoot and his minion (if both of them still have their jobs)
 

BidingMyTime

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I was already in intense labour when my water broke, I had my baby less than five minutes later. Labor comes differently for everyone. I only had back pain which I thought was normal till it went crazy, had the baby a little later. My husband dropped me but had to park the car cos he had packed in front and left the doors open, he missed the birth. Labor happens differently for everyone.
Obviously, which is why I clearly said in my post that there were exceptions. Obviously in a medical emergency, the pharmacist can not stay at the store or otherwise work. But the beginning of labor for most women (again not all) is not a medical emergency.