jtom

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As some of you may know, I graduated with a BS in biology 12/2008. I have met all the pre-reqs except microbio, biochem and depending on the schools I might take an animal science and nutrition class (most likley these will be online courses). I have taken the GRE and while my scores are not extremely extremely bad (1110), I will probably retake the GRE. I have 80 hours of research involving animals but no other experience.

I will obviously not apply this year but was planning on applying next year. I had a plan in place where I would find volunteer work, take the last pre-reqs, and possibly retake the GRE before the October 2011 deadline. While I have a decent gpa, I have no veterinary influence and my main goal was to get as many hours of experience as I can.

The last few weeks I have called 48 vet hospitals etc and two of them said I could shadow but not volunteer and all the rest said no to shadowing and volunteering. However, I later got calls from the two who said I could shadow and they said they could not do that anymore. It seems that shadowing/volunteering is a very uncomfortable issue when I call and no one is willing to do it.

So I began thinking about what to do. I had an idea and am not sure if it would be beneficial or not. I thought I could enroll in a vet tech program and become certified. I have looked at a few programs and they are around 70 credits, with my bachelors I could knock off at least 25 or more credits (the programs are four semesters). I thought with the various courses I could gain those experience hours and would not have to worry about them allowing me to participate. I also thought while I am in the program I could take my pre-reqs (microbio is required for the tech program). I also thought that since they would have some facilities on site or have agreements with local hospitals that it would be much easier to find volunteer hours.

I guess with the fact that I cannot apply this year that it might be more of a good idea. I have looked at past threads and it appears there is a definite bias against doing this and that vet schools would look down on this but i thought I would run it by you guys. With the vet tech program I thought I could take my pre-reqs, gain the hours in courses and outside facitlities using the vet tech program connections, and also have certification necessary to obtain a position as a tech if I dont get in vet school the first round and have at least something to fall back on.

My main issue is that I feel I need to gain experience hours ASAP and I cant afford to wait indefinetly until I find a vet clinic that will allow me to volunteer.

I had one other question: I got my bachelors from the University of South Florida but am only interested in applying to northern schools. My parents feel that there is a strong bias towards southern education and that the only places I stand a chance are in the south and I should never consider northern schools. Is this true?

Thanks!
 
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Minnerbelle

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I had one other question: I got my bachelors from the University of South Florida but am only interested in applying to northern schools. My parents feel that there is a strong bias towards southern education and that the only places I stand a chance are in the south and I should never consider northern schools. Is this true?
Bologna (sp?). Don't let your parents shove that kind of crapsense into you.

Oh... and I know you asked in a different thread, but if you're thinking about becoming a MA resident, then yes, you do need a MA driver's license. I had to change my CA license to a MA one a year before my applications. Keep in mind though, being a MA resident makes it much easier to get into Tufts than if you were OOS, but at least for now, there's no tuition break for IS students. Good thing though, is that in MA, you don't need to take a drivers test again to convert your license. You just hand them over some cash, and they'll exchange your license.
 

david594

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Apply for entry level jobs at vet clinics.
 

sumstorm

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As some of you may know, I graduated with a BS in biology 12/2008. I have met all the pre-reqs except microbio, biochem and depending on the schools I might take an animal science and nutrition class (most likley these will be online courses). I have taken the GRE and while my scores are not extremely extremely bad (1110), I will probably retake the GRE. I have 80 hours of research involving animals but no other experience.

Why can’t you apply next year? Crank in a few classes this summer and figure out how to get experience (I recommend brownies and other baked goods.) Search for other threads on experience or shadowing and you will find ideas. Most schools will let you have some pre-reqs due in the fall and spring semester.

I thought I could enroll in a vet tech program and become certified. I have looked at a few programs and they are around 70 credits, with my bachelors I could knock off at least 25 or more credits (the programs are four semesters). I thought with the various courses I could gain those experience hours and would not have to worry about them allowing me to participate. I also thought while I am in the program I could take my pre-reqs (microbio is required for the tech program). I also thought that since they would have some facilities on site or have agreements with local hospitals that it would be much easier to find volunteer hours.

I don’t know that your vet tech programs will count for vet experience hours. Many programs will not transfer in credits (meaning you might have to do all 70 credit hours). To me, this sounds like you will just be adding time to the process, instead of gaining the experience you need. I generally think it isn’t a great idea UNLESS you have another reason for doing it (other than to get to vet school.)

I had one other question: I got my bachelors from the University of South Florida but am only interested in applying to northern schools. My parents feel that there is a strong bias towards southern education and that the only places I stand a chance are in the south and I should never consider northern schools. Is this true? Thanks!

Which vet school doesn’t really matter (at least when comparing AVMA accredited schools). Especially if your goal is clinical practice vs specialties. However, there is a lot to be said for IS tuition and UF is a good school. So I would apply IS as well, just in case you don’t get in OOS.
 

racccjlm

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Apply for entry level jobs at vet clinics.
This. Vet clinics are often so bogged down with requests for shadowing that they eventually just have to start turning people down. Volunteering brings liability into the picture. I think your best bet would be to find a job in a clinic --- kennels, cleaning, whatever --- and that can be your "in" to watching procedures, shadowing, etc.
 

jtom

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I assumed it would look better if I had all my pre-reqs done before I applied. Thats a good question: does the fact that you have completed all your pre-reqs give you an advantage over others who have not completed all their pre-reqs?

While I dont know for sure, I would have to look into whether I could transfer credits to a vet tech program.

As far as entry level positions, I did not ask the clinics this becuase I have read on here that few vets will hire those without any experience and require significant on the job training. I am very willing to call them all back but I just assumed that volunteering would be more doable then a paid position. In todays economy I just thought there will be too many applicants with some experience that will be hired before me with no experience. I can certainly try though.
 
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twelvetigers

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Everyone has to start somewhere, right? It'll be a bit more difficult, but it's possible. They will likely hire you for kennel or receptionist work, and then you can just make sure you either a: see lots of surgeries etc. at that clinic in your off time, or b: noodle your way into helping out with other areas.

I wouldn't do any vet tech stuff unless you want to be a vet tech. It's just not necessary.

Keep trying though - it took me months to find a place. Wait and decide to apply or not in August or so...see how your experience is coming. Most schools allow you to complete pre-reqs in the spring if needed, and some even allow into the summer. Each school is different though.
 

sumstorm

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I would suggest going in, with resume in hand. I know that takes time, but start with the places closest. It is harder to say no to a person's face than over the phone.
 

heylodeb

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Well, guess I'm on the other side of the fence then everyone else. :) I say if you have the time for tech school and it will increase your chances of getting experience: go for it!

Not sure if I'm going to do it, but I don't think it's a bad idea. I guess it would be nice to see how my future employees/techs are educated! :p
 

moosenanny

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I assumed it would look better if I had all my pre-reqs done before I applied. Thats a good question: does the fact that you have completed all your pre-reqs give you an advantage over others who have not completed all their pre-reqs?
Like almost everything else, I think this depends heavily on the school. The main reason CSU rejected me (according to my file review) was that I was a strong applicant, but many other people had totally finished their pre-reqs and had thus "proven themselves" a little bit more than I had.

However, I was accepted to three other schools (LSU, Mizzou, and Davis) so obviously they didn't mind terribly that I took Physics I, Nutrition, and Genetics this past fall semester, and am taking Physics II, Biochemistry, and Microbiology right now :rolleyes:
 

rileydog

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I agree that you should try to get an entry level job and be honest with the vet that you are applying to vet school and would like exposure to as much of the clinic as possible. It took me 6 months after graduation with my BS to find a volunteer position. After a month volunteering, mostly just observing surgeries and learning how to properly hold for bloodwork and catheters, I finally found a receptionist position in another hospital. I made it clear that I was applying to vet school and wanted vet experience. I have learned to draw blood, place catheters, administer vaccines and do dentals, among other things including assisting in surgeries. The process definitely involves patience and a little luck in finding the right hospital at the right time. Good luck :luck: and by the way, if you are in south Florida you can apply for my job as I am taking the summer off before vet school. :)
 

jtom

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I agree that you should try to get an entry level job and be honest with the vet that you are applying to vet school and would like exposure to as much of the clinic as possible. It took me 6 months after graduation with my BS to find a volunteer position. After a month volunteering, mostly just observing surgeries and learning how to properly hold for bloodwork and catheters, I finally found a receptionist position in another hospital. I made it clear that I was applying to vet school and wanted vet experience. I have learned to draw blood, place catheters, administer vaccines and do dentals, among other things including assisting in surgeries. The process definitely involves patience and a little luck in finding the right hospital at the right time. Good luck :luck: and by the way, if you are in south Florida you can apply for my job as I am taking the summer off before vet school. :)
When are you applying for vet school? I guess I just feel if it takes me 6 months like you to find something it would not be possible to have sufficient hours to be compeitive with 2011 admissions.
 

clouds815

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personally i wouldn't definitely Not go the tech school route. instead of asking to shadow, ask for a job!!!!! (ie - veterinary assistant, or whatever you can get). be persistent and present (i showed up several times at the clinic i work at), use connections if you have any, try and speak directly to the vet if you can, etc.
 

jtom

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Would stating that you are applying for this job to gain exposure for vet school be wise? I would think they might not like that because they would know you would be leaving.

Thanks again for all the replies!
 

rileydog

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When are you applying for vet school? I guess I just feel if it takes me 6 months like you to find something it would not be possible to have sufficient hours to be compeitive with 2011 admissions.
I graduated in Aug. 2008, with all pre reqs done, and got my job in Feb. 2009. I only applied to my instate for the class of 2013 and didn't get in due to lack of experience. I applied for class of 2014 and have been accepted to 2 schools. 6 months was just my experience, you might have better luck. I did have other volunteer experience, just not in a clinic. That month volunteering in the animal hospital made my boss take a chance on me (that and the fact the current receptionist was leaving the next day) Quality of those hours is important too, not just quantity. Working at this job has now qualified me to volunteer in the hospital area at the Wildlife facility, instead of just animal care.
 

moosenanny

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Don't most jobs ask for your availability anyway (start date and about how long you plan on staying)? I'd be honest and say that you want to get the most out of the experience to prep you for vet school. If anything, I think it will make you look more dedicated, but that's just IMHO.
 

clouds815

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I'd be honest. Especially if you can talk straight with the vet. I think for most cases, they are more willing to hire you (as an un-licensed person), work with you and try and teach you stuff that they wouldn't necessarily to a tech if they know you are trying to get to vet school
 

twelvetigers

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It's not BAD to be a tech, by any means... just not necessary. If you have other reasons to do it, then sure, but just to get into vet school? There are probably better (easier, cheaper, more convenient?) ways to get experience, raise the GPA, and impress adcoms. That's all.
 

sumstorm

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Another thought; go in asking for a job....if they say no, turn around with a smile and ask if you could observe in their clinic. It's a sales technique that works well sometimes....if you won't buy the $2k set of knives, won't you buy this one special one at $50? If they are able to do it at all, they often feel they should...since they just said no and you handled it so well.

I am, by no means saying that tech school will keep you out of all vet schools. As usual, it depends. Personally, it seems like a lot of time, energy, and money if you are trying to use it as a stepping stone into vet med...and the reactions by ad coms seem mixed. I don't think, generally, that it will hurt you if you have the grades, additional experience, GRE's, etc as well, as long as you don't have a 'better than' attitude. I just don't think it provides a huge leap in experience for the amount of resources you would have to devote. It can open up some sticky questions though; I know one tech who did get in that had some animal welfare background who was challenged in interviews about attending a school with a high use and euth rate for skill development (catheters, blood draws.)
 

katryn

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On doing tech school first: I would probably only go for it if working as full time tech is definitely your back up plan for never ever getting in to vet school. For me, it was Veterinarian or I pick a different profession, so it would have been a total waste of time and money.

On volunteering/asking for a job: I like sumstorm's idea, go in asking for a job, and if refused then ask about shadowing. I'd also recommend putting together a resume and cover letter instead of just offering to fill out an application--it also never hurts to mention in the cover letter that you would be interested in working, volunteering, or shadowing. I would definitely start you're resume off with a statement about seeking experience for the purpose of entering into the profession of veterinarian. I have found that I got treated very differently than co-workers who weren't interested in going into vet med and just needed a job. Although it seems counter intuitive to hire someone who will eventually leave, most of the vets I have worked for would rather have someone who is genuinely interested in the field.
 
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Becoming a tech isn't bad, but it makes about as much sense as becoming a nurse before applying to medical school - the only way to justify the time and financial investment is if you plan on working as a vet tech for a while first.
 

david594

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The last few weeks I have called 48 vet hospitals etc and two of them said I could shadow but not volunteer and all the rest said no to shadowing and volunteering. However, I later got calls from the two who said I could shadow and they said they could not do that anymore. It seems that shadowing/volunteering is a very uncomfortable issue when I call and no one is willing to do it.
Thinking about it more.... I don't think anyone of us would have really recommend you cold call clinics trying to find a place to gain exposure at.

As someone else said, update your resume and write a cover letter. And basically go door to door to the different hospitals asking if you could speak with someone, or if they could leave a copy of your cover letter/resume for the owner(assuming small clinics).

"I'm looking to pursue veterinary school and was wondering if it would be possible for me to spend some time observing at your clinic".

I'd intentionally avoid the word volunteer since it is a bit taboo in some regards.

I would bet if you tried that you would have much better luck than just cold calling clinics. It takes no effort on a receptionists part to say "Sorry, we don't accept volunteers".
 

smilin1590

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Also, personally for myself, all the clinics that I went to and just dropped my resume off I a)never heard anything back and had to call back multiple times or b) they called me back way down the line once I had a job and said they didn't want me ( in more or less words LOL) I myself learned the best way is to talk to a Doctor or the person who is in charge of hiring or owns the clinic...many times this is the doctor himself/herself present your situation and also leave your resume if need be. You get a better/positive reaction this way. Don't expect to hear back when you just drop off your resume though, expect to follow up with them. Good luck! I know it's hard just persevere:thumbup::luck:
 

purplesaurus

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As far as entry level positions, I did not ask the clinics this becuase I have read on here that few vets will hire those without any experience and require significant on the job training. I am very willing to call them all back but I just assumed that volunteering would be more doable then a paid position. In todays economy I just thought there will be too many applicants with some experience that will be hired before me with no experience. I can certainly try though.
I would suggest you resume/cover letter bomb all the vets in your area. It might result in nothing, but I've had three jobs at vet clinics, and none of them were actually advertised. I stated in my cover letter that I aspired to become a veterinarian, and most were excited about that since they assumed it meant I was interested in learning about the "how" and "why" of things (I was!), not just the "what" I needed to get the job done. Most vets I have met liked to teach about what they were doing.

My first position was as a veterinary nurse with no real previous veterinary experience. I did have some research experience with rats, which may have helped, but I did mostly new things at the clinic.

My other two positions were as a receptionist, and while I wasn't involved in the actual treatments/surgeries/etc., I learned a lot about people! I also learned a little more about the business-y end. I think it was a nice reality check about a lot of the practical side of things.

I also worked in a kennel in a huge clinic, and while the size of the clinic meant I was not exposed to the medical end at all, I really learned a lot about dog temperaments, handling, breeds (who knew there were so many?!), general care, etc. Oh yeah, also, the people!

Even if you did not get a hands-on type of position, I feel most vets are willing to let employees observe cool things (especially if you come in on your time off), and you can always ask lots questions! And on busy days, receptionists or kennel workers may get recruited to help with x-rays or to hold for blood draws.

Oh, you may have tried this already, but you could look into local shelters and rescues for volunteering. Probably wouldn't get you vet experience, but it may add some animal experience, if you just need experience all around.
 
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Oh, you may have tried this already, but you could look into local shelters and rescues for volunteering. Probably wouldn't get you vet experience, but it may add some animal experience, if you just need experience all around.
Actually, our shelter had a staff vet that I shadowed. It was great, because she was so busy surrounded by animals that needed surgeries that I basically got to stand there and help as she slammed out one surgery after another. It would get so intense that I'd actually get worn out from having no breaks and have to leave early. (Seriously, this lady is a MACHINE. She has a regular practice and goes to the shelter 2x a week to do like 10+ surgeries a night for peanuts. She did the fastest spay I've ever seen - it was like slice tie tie tie snip snip snip sew done!) If your shelter has a staff vet, you'll probably have to do some pestering and digging to get to her, but it's totally worth it.
 

purplesaurus

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Actually, our shelter had a staff vet that I shadowed. It was great, because she was so busy surrounded by animals that needed surgeries that I basically got to stand there and help as she slammed out one surgery after another. It would get so intense that I'd actually get worn out from having no breaks and have to leave early. (Seriously, this lady is a MACHINE. She has a regular practice and goes to the shelter 2x a week to do like 10+ surgeries a night for peanuts. She did the fastest spay I've ever seen - it was like slice tie tie tie snip snip snip sew done!) If your shelter has a staff vet, you'll probably have to do some pestering and digging to get to her, but it's totally worth it.
Hey, that's cool. I've looked at a few, and there were no opportunities like that (even though they did have vets). I did get to foster and help in the shelter a little (well, I could have done so more, but my work schedule did not permit it). Fostering was fabulous, and it gave me a ton of animal experience hours (not to mention darling little kitties to play with).
 
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Hey, that's cool. I've looked at a few, and there were no opportunities like that (even though they did have vets). I did get to foster and help in the shelter a little (well, I could have done so more, but my work schedule did not permit it). Fostering was fabulous, and it gave me a ton of animal experience hours (not to mention darling little kitties to play with).
OMG, I had to quit the foster list because I kept wanting every animal they emailed me.
 

purplesaurus

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OMG, I had to quit the foster list because I kept wanting every animal they emailed me.
Totally. And we couldn't do more because we moved to a place that gives out big fines for pets (even temporaries) not specifically allowed in the lease (and we reached our max allowed with two kitties of our own), and people around here are very report-y of the slightest violations. (Seriously, someone called the manager to report that these decorative slats on our screen door fell off!!! Who has time to do that?!)

Also, my kitties weren't too excited about it, and we decided not to stress them out too much if we didn't have to.
 

jtom

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I just want to say that I really do appreciate all the good advice I have recevied! It looks like I have approached this the wrong way. Maybe I should ask you guys before I do anything! I will not pursue vet tech and go in person to every vet clinic in the area in person and try to speak to the manager or vet.

Today I found out I am moving out of state in a few weeks so I guess this was a nice lesson of what not to do. Im assuming I should wait until I can get there in person to start asking about positions in my new area? I thought I might be able to get an interview set in advance before I start the move but it looks like it is far better to do it in person so I think I will just wait until I move there based on my experience with calling vet hospitals.

If anyone is in the Albany, NY area let me know if there are any vet clinics that they know are looking for people (just thought I would ask).

Thanks again!
 
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clouds815

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uggh florida to upstate ny? what are you thinking!!?? ;)
i would sooo go the other way if i could... actually though i guess albany isn't really upstate... but still! (i live a half hour from canada)
 

jtom

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Lets just say I am a polar bear! Ive been up that way before.
 

david594

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uggh florida to upstate ny? what are you thinking!!?? ;)
i would sooo go the other way if i could... actually though i guess albany isn't really upstate... but still! (i live a half hour from canada)
Who are you kidding, anything north of like westchester county is upstate. ;)

I did my undergrad in that area (Troy...) and generally really liked the area.
 

lalzi22

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Who are you kidding, anything north of like westchester county is upstate. ;)

I did my undergrad in that area (Troy...) and generally really liked the area.
As a westchester resident, I resent that. Upstate is a good hour north of us.

As for Albany, my sister goes to school there and is best friends with a pre-vet who shadows at a clinic, so clearly there are clinic there that do it. Plus, its upstate Ny, so their shelters always need help.
 

jtom

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Who are you kidding, anything north of like westchester county is upstate. ;)

I did my undergrad in that area (Troy...) and generally really liked the area.
I have lived in the Albany are before. I know troy well.
 

cowgirla

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No, no, once you get 10 miles outside of Manhattan, you are "upstate"

Of course, none of that is real New York anyway. In fact, it barely qualifies as "New york"

Go Long Island!
 

jtom

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I had another question for you guys: if you had to choose between getting all your pre-reqs done before applying or spending more time preparing for the GRE/getting more experience hours, which would you do?

Also, since this is in the snowbelt, are there less opportunities in the winter for animal experiences?

Thanks again!
 

lalzi22

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No, no, once you get 10 miles outside of Manhattan, you are "upstate"

Of course, none of that is real New York anyway. In fact, it barely qualifies as "New york"

Go Long Island!
PSHHH. No thanks, no LongGuyLander (that is how you guys pronounce it) here. I prefer to not sound like The Situation.
 

lalzi22

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I had another question for you guys: if you had to choose between getting all your pre-reqs done before applying or spending more time preparing for the GRE/getting more experience hours, which would you do?

Also, since this is in the snowbelt, are there less opportunities in the winter for animal experiences?

Thanks again!
#1- it is actually slightly below the snowbelt (thanks latitudinal lines being curved!), Albany gets snow, but its more very cold rain.

#2- No. It just means you will be indoors, or you at least want to be. Cant imagine following a LA vet from barn to barn in winter. Yuck.

As for the experience vs pre-reqs....I honestly have no idea. I think I would try to balance both as much as you can. Maybe someone else will have more intelligible ideas for that.
 

cowgirla

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#2- No. It just means you will be indoors, or you at least want to be. Cant imagine following a LA vet from barn to barn in winter. Yuck.
There's no better way to show dedication to the job field than by following a vet out to farm call, for a colicking horse, at midnight, in the middle of a blizzard :laugh: If that doesnt scare you, not much will.

As for prereqs vs experience, I suppose that depends... what's your GPA like now? How much experience do you have so far?
 

jtom

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I think it depends on the specific year. When I lived in albany some years we would get alot of snow. However, last winter I heard that there was not much snow but really cold.
 

jtom

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I have a 3.69 gpa and have to take biochem and micro and possibly a few animal classes. I have no experience however, I was planning on making that my priority. Im sure I can do everything, just thought I would ask if one should take importance over the other.
 

StartingoverVet

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I had another question for you guys: if you had to choose between getting all your pre-reqs done before applying or spending more time preparing for the GRE/getting more experience hours, which would you do?

Thanks again!
It depends (as usual). A big portion of the answer to this question depends on the school. Some schools seem to be a bit anal about % of pre-reqs done to apply and when they need to be completed by. Some schools are pretty relaxed about it.

If the school isn't uptight on the issue then don't worry too much about jamming in the pre-reqs. GRE school is a big part of getting thru the process as is experience. IMO, those are more important and will make you a more rounded applicant.

Anecdotal experiences are hard to generalize from, but in my situation, I still had had a handful of classes to complete when I applied and it didn't seem to matter at any of the schools I applied to (except arguably at CSU where they wanted more UPPER level classes, not necessarily pre-reqs).

Hope that helps.
 

Minnerbelle

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I had another question for you guys: if you had to choose between getting all your pre-reqs done before applying or spending more time preparing for the GRE/getting more experience hours, which would you do?
totally my opinion, and not so much based on any kind of facts... but

If your GPA is already above a 3.5 and you have at least some upper level courses done, I wouldn't worry as much about finishing your pre-reqs.

If your GRE is above a 1200, then I wouldn't worry as much about improving your GRE.

If you already have at least a few hundred hours of experience in at least 3 different fields, I wouldn't worry as much about improving your experience.

Whichever one of these you're farther from achieving would be what I would personally concentrate on... though I feel like you can study for the GRE along with one or the other of the two.
 

jtom

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totally my opinion, and not so much based on any kind of facts... but

If your GPA is already above a 3.5 and you have at least some upper level courses done, I wouldn't worry as much about finishing your pre-reqs.

If your GRE is above a 1200, then I wouldn't worry as much about improving your GRE.

If you already have at least a few hundred hours of experience in at least 3 different fields, I wouldn't worry as much about improving your experience.

Whichever one of these you're farther from achieving would be what I would personally concentrate on... though I feel like you can study for the GRE along with one or the other of the two.
Thanks for the info and everyone else.

BTW, I did not get the job I had interviewed for in mass. Would have been very nice to get a MA license and address for tufts. I will apply there anyways.
 

Ben and Me

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Another point - make sure you look nice when you go in to drop off your resume. I wore a suit skirt and cotton v-neck sweater. If you're a male, I'd wear khakis and a button down shirt.

I also got frustrated trying to find a clinic job after graduation since I also didn't have a ton of experience. I ended up driving around to nearby clinics and dropping off a professional cover letter and resume.

Within 5 minutes of dropping off my resume at one clinic, I got a phone call and had an interview a few days later. I'm sure it was because I was polite and smiley to the receptionist and looked professional - she ran my resume right back to the clinic owner. I worked there for 1.5 years until heading off to school. It was a fantastic clinic w/ a great working environment--I got so lucky! Good clinics will find room for someone if they think you'll be a great fit - so make yourself look like you'll be a great fit!

So, it does work. You just have to be patient.
 

jtom

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I had another question (haha): Can you apply to two programs at once? Meaning I am interested in also applying to an MPH program with veterinary concentration at the vet schools in case I dont get in the DVM program.

I will defetinly dress up, anything to increase my chances.

Thanks!
 

purplesaurus

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A few more thoughts:

totally my opinion, and not so much based on any kind of facts... but

If your GPA is already above a 3.5 and you have at least some upper level courses done, I wouldn't worry as much about finishing your pre-reqs.

If your GRE is above a 1200, then I wouldn't worry as much about improving your GRE.

If you already have at least a few hundred hours of experience in at least 3 different fields, I wouldn't worry as much about improving your experience.

Whichever one of these you're farther from achieving would be what I would personally concentrate on... though I feel like you can study for the GRE along with one or the other of the two.
This is pretty much what I was going to post. Make sure all your areas are competitive, but actively focus on which are lacking.

Within 5 minutes of dropping off my resume at one clinic, I got a phone call and had an interview a few days later. I'm sure it was because I was polite and smiley to the receptionist and looked professional - she ran my resume right back to the clinic owner.
Yes! Be friendly and professional when talking to the receptionists! I also got bumped up from The Resume Stack to an actual interview for my vet nurse job because the receptionist (who had been there 20 years...) took special note of me and mentioned it. After I got the job, she told me that I had a very good attitude when I came in and that this stood out to her.

I had another question (haha): Can you apply to two programs at once? Meaning I am interested in also applying to an MPH program with veterinary concentration at the vet schools in case I dont get in the DVM program.
Here is my immediate reaction, and maybe someone else can support or refute this. I don't see a problem if you applied to vet school at University X and a graduate program at University Y. However, I would be worried about applying to both at University X because either program could view it as you are not fully committed to them.

Am I being totally paranoid here?
 

Ben and Me

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I had another question (haha): Can you apply to two programs at once? Meaning I am interested in also applying to an MPH program with veterinary concentration at the vet schools in case I dont get in the DVM program.
When are MPH applications due? I know for many masters programs, applications aren't due until well after vet school applications are - so you might have a good idea if you're going to be accepted or not by the time your application was even due.