Sep 11, 2015
3
0
Status
Pre-Dental
I'm applying this cycle and just got my GPA processed.
BCP/Science/Non-Science/Total = 2.49/2.52/3.63/2.90 inc +-.

In addition to being an average student, my science classes are abysmally low because I failed a class four times (I know, really stupid). I didn't think that it'd pull me down this much and I'm freaking out because I have no idea what to do moving forward.
I'm applying this cycle to 20 schools. With this knowledge now, if I even get an interview I'd break out laughing.

Here are my other stats, if you all could give me some guidance it'd be so so appreciated:
Neurobiology major. Non-minority at a top 15 public university.
GPA: 2.90 cum, 2.49 BCP
DAT: 20AA/18TS/20PAT (17/19/18/20/26/19 = bio/gc/oc/pat/rc/qr)
very strong ECs (pres outreach org, co-founder two other outreach orgs, and more)
strong research (scholarship, 3 years, 2000+hrs, no pubs)
pretty good letters (1 PI, 1 sci prof, 1 hum prof, 1 dentist, all know me well)
70+hrs observing at 5+ offices
also a volunteer dental assistant. Expecting 50+ hrs by January, many more later

I'm entering a fifth year so I can't take many more classes. Unless I double-major, which might be an option. Or should I get a master's? Post-bacc? Where do I even go?

Also what do I do about that one class that I kept failing? Biochem btw. I tried it, freaked out, dropped. Took it again later in a heavy courseload and failed. Freaked out even more and tried to pile it onto my other coursework and did even worse. The solution is obvious, and I'm gonna ace it next quarter on a lighter courseload, but how will I even begin to explain this massive string of failures?

Thank you so much for your input. I really need it.
 
Last edited:
Sep 27, 2014
386
195
Baltimore
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I would figure out a work habit and time management program that fits your strengths and weaknesses. Once you have figured that out, you need to pull together a string of A's, say 30+ credits filled with science and math classes that are 200 level or higher. Then enroll into a post-bac (formal or informal) and you need to ace that program. I have personally seen students in similar shoes GPA wise (2.5-3.0) as you that got into their state dental schools but they rocked their post-bac and DAT (23AA+). They all took a step back and evaluated what was wrong with their study habits (mostly procrastination). I suggest you take similar action or else this process will be an entire waste of effort and money.
 
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OP
O
Sep 11, 2015
3
0
Status
Pre-Dental
I would figure out a work habit and time management program that fits your strengths and weaknesses. Once you have figured that out, you need to pull together a string of A's, say 30+ credits filled with science and math classes that are 200 level or higher. Then enroll into a post-bac (formal or informal) and you need to ace that program. I have personally seen students in similar shoes GPA wise (2.5-3.0) as you that got into their state dental schools but they rocked their post-bac and DAT (23AA+). They all took a step back and evaluated what was wrong with their study habits (mostly procrastination). I suggest you take similar action or else this process will be an entire waste of effort and money.
Rx, Thank you very much for your feedback. You're right that I need to fix my study habits. As for those sci classes, does 200 consistently look better to adcom than 100? I hear at my uni that grad classes are generally easier to ace than undergrad. I am unfamiliar with informal post-bacs. Is that basically a continuation of those 100/200 classes at my university?

Also, are post-bacs generally more favored upon than MS?
 
Sep 27, 2014
386
195
Baltimore
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Your performance in the upper division maths and sciences are a better predictor of your success in dental school than your performance in the 100 level courses. An informal post-bac can either be pursued at your current or another accredited university, while a formal one allows you to take courses with current dental students - this option is a bit more expensive and requires a GPA and DAT minimum (differs for each school). In either situation, you are expected to ace your coursework so I would not say a particular option is favored over the other.
 
OP
O
Sep 11, 2015
3
0
Status
Pre-Dental
Thank you. My mistake--at my school, lower-div classes are in the 1s while upper-div are 100s. Grad are 200s. So between upper-div and grad courses, is there a preference? I am planning on busting out all the upper-div bio courses I can handle, but if grad courses are recommended then I'll look for those too.

Looks like I'll be going for an informal post-bac for now. I also hear talk of MS degrees though. In my situation, should that be avoided? Since MS counts for grad and not undergrad.
 
Dec 24, 2013
290
148
Status
Pre-Dental
Thank you. My mistake--at my school, lower-div classes are in the 1s while upper-div are 100s. Grad are 200s. So between upper-div and grad courses, is there a preference? I am planning on busting out all the upper-div bio courses I can handle, but if grad courses are recommended then I'll look for those too.

Looks like I'll be going for an informal post-bac for now. I also hear talk of MS degrees though. In my situation, should that be avoided? Since MS counts for grad and not undergrad.
Take upper-divs. Ignore the grad courses, since they're harder than upper-divs. You likely won't be accepted to a MS program because your GPA doesn't fall between 3.0-3.5. Informal post-baccs (continuation of undergrad courses) are reserved for lower GPAs.
Source: my pre-health advisor