lilPhysician

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In community oncology practices, are oncologists responsible for common 'residency' issues with cancer patients ie. managing opiates and pain medications, anti-nausea medications, etc.

I would like to just be responsible for the chemo and surveillance of their primary disease, I understand many oncologists don't mess with other issues and usually have palliative care or pain medicine and some other ancillary staff to refer for those issues.

Also, what percent of oncology is inpatient vs outpatient? I understand community practice is mostly outpatient but to what extent, I don't know. What does inpatient oncology consistent of? Consults? primary service?
 

gutonc

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In community oncology practices, are oncologists responsible for common 'residency' issues with cancer patients ie. managing opiates and pain medications, anti-nausea medications, etc.

I would like to just be responsible for the chemo and surveillance of their primary disease, I understand many oncologists don't mess with other issues and usually have palliative care or pain medicine and some other ancillary staff to refer for those issues.
If you're not willing to manage the complications of the disease you treat, or the treatment that you order, then you need to find a different line of work. I hear Starbucks has good health insurance.

On a good day I'm 50/50 chemo/other stuff. It's usually more like 20/80.
 

Celestia

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In community oncology practices, are oncologists responsible for common 'residency' issues with cancer patients ie. managing opiates and pain medications, anti-nausea medications, etc.

I would like to just be responsible for the chemo and surveillance of their primary disease, I understand many oncologists don't mess with other issues and usually have palliative care or pain medicine and some other ancillary staff to refer for those issues.

Also, what percent of oncology is inpatient vs outpatient? I understand community practice is mostly outpatient but to what extent, I don't know. What does inpatient oncology consistent of? Consults? primary service?

I think your question just reflects a little unfamiliarity with the typical practice of an oncologist.

I think gutonc is absolutely right - given how common cancer-related pain and chemotherapy-induced nausea are, it is inevitable that a medical oncologist will manage opiates, pain, nausea. I do refer to palliative medicine if these become intractable, but it's pretty rare. Doesn't seem fair to the patient to introduce them to another physician/team if I can handle it more quickly on my own.

I only do ~10-20% dedicated inpatient time, but it's pretty typical that I will have at least one patient in the hospital. My inpatient time is a combination of both consultations and primary service (attending on oncology ward).
 
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