Quantcast

Caribbean Ross/SGU?

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.
Status
Not open for further replies.

Jz.rizvi03

New Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2018
Messages
7
Reaction score
0

Members don't see this ad.
so I didn’t exactly have the best years in undergrad and I’m about to graduate with a 2.81 GPA
EC’s are great with internships with surgeons at MD Anderson and all of that
Worked in ER for the past 3 years at a level 1 trauma hospital, etc etc
LOR are solid as well
Haven’t taken the MCAT yet but studying hard for it!

What are my chances at Ross and SGU?

(Please don’t tell me why I shouldn’t go etc etc because i want to go in the next cycle ASAP preferably Sept 2018)
 

Isoval

PGY-1 Internal Medicine
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2017
Messages
1,811
Reaction score
3,048
Didn’t read the OP.

The answer is no.

I’m not really sure what you asked, but the answer is no.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 18 users

Pagan FutureDoc

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2015
Messages
1,062
Reaction score
1,527
Realisticly both school will be likely to accept you if you can pay.
And both schools will prepare you just as well to have massive debt and maybe a 50% chance if ever being a doctor
 
  • Like
Reactions: 9 users

DBC03

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2016
Messages
2,432
Reaction score
3,041
Are you asking about your chances of getting in or your chances of actually becoming a doctor after you go? You need to think carefully about what your end goal is. If you simply want to go to medical school, you can probably get into one of those. If you actually want to end up as a practicing physician, your chances drop significantly.


Sent from my iPad using SDN mobile
 
  • Like
Reactions: 3 users

foxwood

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2017
Messages
114
Reaction score
112
Are you asking about your chances of getting in or your chances of actually becoming a doctor after you go? You need to think carefully about what your end goal is. If you simply want to go to medical school, you can probably get into one of those. If you actually want to end up as a practicing physician, your chances drop significantly.
A better bet would be to do a post bac or master programs. Get killer grades which will help offset the low undergrad gpa. Get a decent MCAT score and you would have a legitimate shot at minimum of a DO acceptance. Caribbean schools are such a crapshoot why go into massive debt and maybe have a 50-50 shot (or less) at a US residency.


Sent from my iPad using SDN mobile
 

Mwooster

US MD Candidate
7+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2011
Messages
389
Reaction score
709
so I didn’t exactly have the best years in undergrad and I’m about to graduate with a 2.81 GPA
EC’s are great with internships with surgeons at MD Anderson and all of that
Worked in ER for the past 3 years at a level 1 trauma hospital, etc etc
LOR are solid as well
Haven’t taken the MCAT yet but studying hard for it!

What are my chances at Ross and SGU?

(Please don’t tell me why I shouldn’t go etc etc because i want to go in the next cycle ASAP preferably Sept 2018)

Chances excellent at both SGU and Ross. They might MERP your behind initially, but they will accept you.

If that's the case, then odds of you making my latte at Starbucks or my burrito at Chipotle starting around the summer of 2020 are excellent as well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 8 users

Jdp00921

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 22, 2013
Messages
296
Reaction score
320
so I didn’t exactly have the best years in undergrad and I’m about to graduate with a 2.81 GPA
EC’s are great with internships with surgeons at MD Anderson and all of that
Worked in ER for the past 3 years at a level 1 trauma hospital, etc etc
LOR are solid as well
Haven’t taken the MCAT yet but studying hard for it!

What are my chances at Ross and SGU?

(Please don’t tell me why I shouldn’t go etc etc because i want to go in the next cycle ASAP preferably Sept 2018)

Just figured I'd give my $0.02. You clearly are familiar with the stigma toward Caribbean Medical Schools here on SDN, or at least that is my assumption given your request at the end of your post (which I bolded). With that in mind, I'm not sure why you would even ask such a question on here?!? The advice you will get on SDN will be overwhelmingly unanimous (although sometimes with the random Caribbean defender) - don't go to a Caribbean Medical School. I don't need to get into why, as I'm sure if you explored the option with even the least bit of thoroughness, you know that answer already.

To answer your question: I have absolutely no experience with Caribbean Med Schools, but based on simply reading online (SDN + numerous others) - your chances are likely 100% if you can foot the bill, have grades (I'm not sure the value of those grades really matter), and you can read/write/speak.

Good luck, whatever you decide!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 5 users

Princeton Medical Student

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Messages
1,325
Reaction score
3,088
With a 2.8 GPA you have 0 chance if making it past the rigorous Carrib preclinicals without being kicked out. So 0.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users
D

deleted480308

Don’t do this. You are a high risk for losing all that tuition when you fail out
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

libertyyne

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2015
Messages
10,956
Reaction score
22,469
get your gpa above 3.0 , get a good mcat and apply DO.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 7 users

Lucca

Will Walk Rope for Sandwich
Staff member
Administrator
Volunteer Staff
7+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2013
Messages
8,594
Reaction score
19,798
Don’t go Carib. Strong post bacc or SMP with an mcat above 507 and you’ll be OK for DO. *maybe* MD with a 4.0 postbacc, a strong mcat, and a compelling story. Other than that, consider other careers.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 5 users

libertyyne

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2015
Messages
10,956
Reaction score
22,469
Don’t go Carib. Strong post bacc or SMP with an mcat above 507 and you’ll be OK for DO. *maybe* MD with a 4.0 postbacc, a strong mcat, and a compelling story. Other than that, consider other careers.
im willing to bet a 3.0+gpa and a 507 would get a newer DO seat.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 3 users

Apothecary Aquinas

MS4
2+ Year Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2017
Messages
282
Reaction score
634
Both will probably accept you with open arms as both prey off of people who desperately want to go to medical school but who aren't academically cut out for it. Now I don't know you or your situation so I can only speak from assumption, but you've obviously had a really rough time academically. What makes you think you're ready to go out and crush medical school, arguably one of the toughest professional schools? Everybody thinks they're the exception and that while they, "...had a hard time in undergrad, I'm confident I can really buckle down and get through medical school." Even if you had 1,000 hours of shadowing and 5 years working in a hospital, this doesn't mean you can make it through medical school.

You need to take a solid Post-Bacc course load or do a SMP to get your GPA up and not only prove to others you can handle academia but prove to yourself you can. No matter what you may have convinced yourself of there is no solid evidence here you could handle medical school even if you got in. Take a year or two, get your GPA up and prove to everyone you can make straight A's, crush the MCAT and continue your EC's (don't forget volunteering, I didn't see you list that) and you'll have a good shot at DO schools and even some low-tier US MD schools (better or worse chance depending on what state you live in).

If Caribbean schools don't think you're doing well enough and that you might not pass Step 1 (among other things) they will kick you out or kick you back a year possibly leaving you with hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt and nothing to show for it. On top of that trying to match is a nightmare. There are far better options. Swallow your pride and take everyone's advice.

And if you think we're wrong I genuinely ask - What makes you think you'll succeed in medical school when you've never proven yourself academically? Are you simply convinced you've "changed"? Or is there some circumstance you've failed to mention?
 
  • Like
Reactions: 5 users
Members don't see this ad :)

altblue

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2014
Messages
1,900
Reaction score
2,587
Bruh, if you're so impatient that you have to apply this cycle, what makes you think you have the patience to sit through 2 years of full-time memorizing and 2 years of 12-hour rotations and do well enough to get a residency?

A 2.8 doesn't exactly scream "success" either.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 6 users

Matthew9Thirtyfive

kitty cat yin yang
Moderator Emeritus
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2016
Messages
24,743
Reaction score
44,411
W7CG.gif
 
  • Like
Reactions: 5 users

Turkishking

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2015
Messages
2,446
Reaction score
1,215
You will get admitted. Before you resort to this idea, you should at least work on improving your application, and try 2 cycles. If both cycles fail with an improved application, you can try the Carib at your own risk.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 4 users

fujiwara

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2016
Messages
32
Reaction score
23
In regards to chances, you may be put in CFP or MERP. I think maybe direct admission for Ross due to low numbers of applications this year. With regards to SGU you have higher chance of being in CFP. With regards to how well youll do here will depend entirely upto you. People on sdn told me the same thing (how I was going to fail and whether I should be going or not, other pessimistic statements, etc) but quite contrary to some of their prediction im doing fine and am currently on my way to being part of deans list and honor society. That being said, you will have to really buckle down and work twice as hard if you want to succeed here. As a side note, unless you're citizen of country that does not allow for grade replacement (I.e Canada) best thing would be to redo some courses, raise your GPA and apply for in state schools. This will not only make your overall journey easier but also save you ton of money in the long run.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Jz.rizvi03

New Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2018
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
In regards to chances, you may be put in CFP or MERP. I think maybe direct admission for Ross due to low numbers of applications this year. With regards to SGU you have higher chance of being in CFP. With regards to how well youll do here will depend entirely upto you. People on sdn told me the same thing (how I was going to fail and whether I should be going or not, other pessimistic statements, etc) but quite contrary to some of their prediction im doing fine and am currently on my way to being part of deans list and honor society. That being said, you will have to really buckle down and work twice as hard if you want to succeed here. As a side note, unless you're citizen of country that does not allow for grade replacement (I.e Canada) best thing would be to redo some courses, raise your GPA and apply for in state schools. This will not only make your overall journey easier but also save you ton of money in the long run.
P
In regards to chances, you may be put in CFP or MERP. I think maybe direct admission for Ross due to low numbers of applications this year. With regards to SGU you have higher chance of being in CFP. With regards to how well youll do here will depend entirely upto you. People on sdn told me the same thing (how I was going to fail and whether I should be going or not, other pessimistic statements, etc) but quite contrary to some of their prediction im doing fine and am currently on my way to being part of deans list and honor society. That being said, you will have to really buckle down and work twice as hard if you want to succeed here. As a side note, unless you're citizen of country that does not allow for grade replacement (I.e Canada) best thing would be to redo some courses, raise your GPA and apply for in state schools. This will not only make your overall journey easier but also save you ton of money in the long run.


Thanks for your response it makes me feel better! I’ve made my mind about going to Ross/SGU bc of time constraints and all. Do you think it’s worth getting into the CFP and doing it that way at SGU?

And how come the applications have decreased for Ross?
 

libertyyne

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2015
Messages
10,956
Reaction score
22,469
P



Thanks for your response it makes me feel better! I’ve made my mind about going to Ross/SGU bc of time constraints and all. Do you think it’s worth getting into the CFP and doing it that way at SGU?

And how come the applications have decreased for Ross?
Boat .
 
  • Like
Reactions: 3 users

Isoval

PGY-1 Internal Medicine
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2017
Messages
1,811
Reaction score
3,048
P



Thanks for your response it makes me feel better! I’ve made my mind about going to Ross/SGU bc of time constraints and all. Do you think it’s worth getting into the CFP and doing it that way at SGU?

And how come the applications have decreased for Ross?


Also Ross.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

fujiwara

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2016
Messages
32
Reaction score
23
P



Thanks for your response it makes me feel better! I’ve made my mind about going to Ross/SGU bc of time constraints and all. Do you think it’s worth getting into the CFP and doing it that way at SGU?

And how come the applications have decreased for Ross?

Not sure what's causing you this urgency to go this year but know that you can essentially take even longer to practice (lower likelihood of being in field of your choice as well) if going through this route. I have few colleagues who got in via CFP and the impression they gave me was that it was immensely difficult. Almost more than actually being in the medical program itself. But this may be due to rigorous challenges during the cfp and numerous changes they've made to their study habits and etc. Quite honestly speaking, you can apply and see what they will offer you and sit on that while brainstorming your options. Here are some cases for you to really think about. You can take a year improving marks, get in state school, do well, Not worry about attrition, get in specialty or your choice at the cost of 1 extra year. You can also go to sgu/Ross, do well, write more exams and do well but have difficulty matching for years or settle for a field you have absolutely no interest or passion in while paying way more for tuition. Lastly, in the worst case scenario, you go to Ross/SGU you don't do well and either fail out or just barely pass putting you in a spot where it'll be virtually impossible to get a residency. Imo this is pretty much the reality of some of the choices at hand right now. As a Canadian I didn't have option 1 so this was the next best choice if I wanted to go back to Canada as going back to Canada is pretty much impossible as a DO.

As for Ross, the decreased application is due to the storm.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

mcat_taker

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2014
Messages
945
Reaction score
633
P



Thanks for your response it makes me feel better! I’ve made my mind about going to Ross/SGU bc of time constraints and all. Do you think it’s worth getting into the CFP and doing it that way at SGU?

And how come the applications have decreased for Ross?

What time constraints ???? Aren't you still in college about to graduate, so you're like what 22? What the F time constraints. The average matriculant age (the entry age) is like 26. Don't talk to me about time constraints. Slow down, study hard for the MCAT. Thats your first test to see if you have what it takes at this level, cause a 2.8 doesn't show that you do. If you do well on the MCAT, you are much more likely to do well in med school. Otherwise you have loads of time to improve your app.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
D

deleted888443

To answer your question: I have absolutely no experience with Caribbean Med Schools, but based on simply reading online (SDN + numerous others) - your chances are likely 100% if you can foot the bill, have grades (I'm not sure the value of those grades really matter), and you can read/write/speak.

Good luck, whatever you decide!
Yet you feel experienced enough to speak about who Caribbean schools accept, based on what you read on forums. These schools don’t just accept everyone. I know because I’ve been rejected from one.

OP, don’t trust everything you read online. You need to talk to current students and people who are practing who have actually experienced what it’s like to go to a Caribbean school. It doesn’t matter if people on these forums are verified med school faculty or whatever. None of these people have the expertise on Caribbean schools, other than their biased opinions. Don’t base a decision that could change your life for better or worse, on what neurotic premeds say on a web forum, whether what they say is positive or negative. It will only cause you more anxiety. Do your own research, look at published match statistics, and determine whether going to the Caribbean is a calculated risk you’re willing to take.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users
Members don't see this ad :)

libertyyne

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2015
Messages
10,956
Reaction score
22,469
Yet you feel experienced enough to speak about who Caribbean schools accept, based on what you read on forums. These schools don’t just accept everyone. I know because I’ve been rejected from one.

OP, don’t trust everything you read online. You need to talk to current students and people who are practing who have actually experienced what it’s like to go to a Caribbean school. It doesn’t matter if people on these forums are verified med school faculty or whatever. None of these people have the expertise on Caribbean schools, other than their biased opinions. Don’t base a decision that could change your life for better or worse, on what neurotic premeds say on a web forum, whether what they say is positive or negative. It will only cause you more anxiety. Do your own research, look at published match statistics, and determine whether going to the Caribbean is a calculated risk you’re willing to take.
The problem with published match statistics is that it doesnt incorporate drop out rate or people booted from the program. Realistically the successful match rates are somewhere in the 40ish percent range according to gonnif's appraisal of the match data and entering class sizes. Going DO is a much safer strategy, otherwise one is more likely to end up with debt no degree, or debt with degree without match compared to matching.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Jdp00921

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 22, 2013
Messages
296
Reaction score
320
Yet you feel experienced enough to speak about who Caribbean schools accept, based on what you read on forums. These schools don’t just accept everyone. I know because I’ve been rejected from one.

OP, don’t trust everything you read online. You need to talk to current students and people who are practing who have actually experienced what it’s like to go to a Caribbean school. It doesn’t matter if people on these forums are verified med school faculty or whatever. None of these people have the expertise on Caribbean schools, other than their biased opinions. Don’t base a decision that could change your life for better or worse, on what neurotic premeds say on a web forum, whether what they say is positive or negative. It will only cause you more anxiety. Do your own research, look at published match statistics, and determine whether going to the Caribbean is a calculated risk you’re willing to take.

Touche. I shouldn't comment if I have no personal experience with Caribbean Medical Schools. In my defense, though, I wasn't claiming to be an expert on Caribbean Med School affairs. I was simply commenting on acceptance rates, which (albeit an assumption of mine based on research, not personal experience) I'm sure are very, very high as opposed to US MD/DO counterparts.

I wish nothing but the best of luck to anyone taking the Caribbean route!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

DrStephenStrange

Neurology PGY-0
2+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Messages
3,275
Reaction score
5,148
Have a heartbeat and the ability to get US federal loans. You're good to go. I'm not going to suggest anything since you don't want to hear why you shouldn't go. But I'll tell you this though going Caribbean route should be your last resort after you have used all your chances for a US MD/DO.

Sent from my SM-G950U using SDN mobile
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

hmania

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 5, 2012
Messages
276
Reaction score
82
OP, as a student from ROSS whom has been through the battle and 98% done with school. Here is my two cents.

You opened a can of worms once you asked whether you would make it into/through either ROSS or SGU. You knew publishing this would make forum trolls appear out of thin air and comment the words "NO, don't go". I would say, "it is your money, your time, and ultimately your life". With a sub-par GPA in undergrad it "could" predict the outcome of medical school, but you are the only variable that could create a different future. I have met many people whom walked through Ross with a horrible MCAT or GPA unworthy of medicine, but they proved to be the hardest worker and the smartest people whom are on track to match this year.

My own story may not be the same as yours as a I had a high GPA, but low MCAT of 20 after 3 times taking the exam. However, it is possible to make it through if you are mature enough to manage your studies and stay focus. If you are young, naive and YOLO type of person... this route isn't made for the faint hearted and weak minded.

Go forth and make your decision... Padawan.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 5 users

Matthew9Thirtyfive

kitty cat yin yang
Moderator Emeritus
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2016
Messages
24,743
Reaction score
44,411
You knew publishing this would make forum trolls appear out of thin air and comment the words "NO, don't go".
Lol at people giving op the sensible advice not to throw herself into debt and toss away any chance of ever practicing medicine as a physician being the trolls.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 5 users

altblue

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2014
Messages
1,900
Reaction score
2,587
I love how the OP is getting advice in multiple different tones and of course from multiple different posters and still wants to go! Isn't even going to argue or question us, just Stonewall .

I get why someone with a little less knowledge might cave in to parental or cultural pressure, but in this case? Now that's some stubbornness.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 4 users

Princeton Medical Student

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Messages
1,325
Reaction score
3,088
P



Thanks for your response it makes me feel better! I’ve made my mind about going to Ross/SGU bc of time constraints and all. Do you think it’s worth getting into the CFP and doing it that way at SGU?

And how come the applications have decreased for Ross?
2 years later: "HELP IM GETTING KICKED OUT OF ROSS WITH 1000000 MILLION DOLLARS OF DEBT WHAT DO I DO"
 
  • Like
Reactions: 3 users

Jz.rizvi03

New Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2018
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
OP, as a student from ROSS whom has been through the battle and 98% done with school. Here is my two cents.

You opened a can of worms once you asked whether you would make it into/through either ROSS or SGU. You knew publishing this would make forum trolls appear out of thin air and comment the words "NO, don't go". I would say, "it is your money, your time, and ultimately your life". With a sub-par GPA in undergrad it "could" predict the outcome of medical school, but you are the only variable that could create a different future. I have met many people whom walked through Ross with a horrible MCAT or GPA unworthy of medicine, but they proved to be the hardest worker and the smartest people whom are on track to match this year.

My own story may not be the same as yours as a I had a high GPA, but low MCAT of 20 after 3 times taking the exam. However, it is possible to make it through if you are mature enough to manage your studies and stay focus. If you are young, naive and YOLO type of person... this route isn't made for the faint hearted and weak minded.

Go forth and make your decision... Padawan.


Thank you for this, it really helps! Based on my stats do you believe if I were to do average to good on the MCAT I would be considered for Ross/SGU?
 

Jz.rizvi03

New Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2018
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Yet you feel experienced enough to speak about who Caribbean schools accept, based on what you read on forums. These schools don’t just accept everyone. I know because I’ve been rejected from one.

OP, don’t trust everything you read online. You need to talk to current students and people who are practing who have actually experienced what it’s like to go to a Caribbean school. It doesn’t matter if people on these forums are verified med school faculty or whatever. None of these people have the expertise on Caribbean schools, other than their biased opinions. Don’t base a decision that could change your life for better or worse, on what neurotic premeds say on a web forum, whether what they say is positive or negative. It will only cause you more anxiety. Do your own research, look at published match statistics, and determine whether going to the Caribbean is a calculated risk you’re willing to take.


Thank you!! I’ve been reading all these comments about Caribbean from people who haven’t been and they just bash. Someone I know who’s there right now in Tennessee says that it’s nothing like these people make it out to be. Would you mind mentioning your stats and where you got rejected from/why? I’m quite nervous about my stats
 
Members don't see this ad :)
D

deleted888443

Thank you!! I’ve been reading all these comments about Caribbean from people who haven’t been and they just bash. Someone I know who’s there right now in Tennessee says that it’s nothing like these people make it out to be. Would you mind mentioning your stats and where you got rejected from/why? I’m quite nervous about my stats
Hey. I got rejected from SGU with a 2.8 and 501 mcat. I got rejected because of my grades. They told me to do a masters degree, but I’ve been doing postbacc for the last year with a decent gpa in it (3.7). I think if you had any kind of upward trend then sgu would take that into account. I would aim for an mcat score as close to 528 as you can get ;) .

Lastly, don’t let these people bring you down. They don’t know who you are or what your story is, yet they like to say you’ll be someone who will fail out in two years. Whether you fail out or not is in your hands. Instead of going on sdn, you should take a long hard look at what your own abilities are and see if this path is right for you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users

Jz.rizvi03

New Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2018
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Hey. I got rejected from SGU with a 2.8 and 501 mcat. I got rejected because of my grades. They told me to do a masters degree, but I’ve been doing postbacc for the last year with a decent gpa in it (3.7). I think if you had any kind of upward trend then sgu would take that into account. I would aim for an mcat score as close to 528 as you can get ;) .

Lastly, don’t let these people bring you down. They don’t know who you are or what your story is, yet they like to say you’ll be someone who will fail out in two years. Whether you fail out or not is in your hands. Instead of going on sdn, you should take a long hard look at what your own abilities are and see if this path is right for you.


Ohh wow congrats on your post bacc! That’s awesome! Exactly, I don’t allow them to determine my failure or success I’m just worried about getting in first. Did you apply at Ross or only SGU?
 
D

deleted888443

Ohh wow congrats on your post bacc! That’s awesome! Exactly, I don’t allow them to determine my failure or success I’m just worried about getting in first. Did you apply at Ross or only SGU?
I applied to both, and got into Ross
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Jdp00921

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 22, 2013
Messages
296
Reaction score
320
Thank you!! I’ve been reading all these comments about Caribbean from people who haven’t been and they just bash. Someone I know who’s there right now in Tennessee says that it’s nothing like these people make it out to be. Would you mind mentioning your stats and where you got rejected from/why? I’m quite nervous about my stats

Just want to stress that I was certainly not "bashing" anyone. I simply stressed the fact that it's quite a bit easier to get into Caribbean Med Schools (compared with US MD/DO; I did assume that others would understand that it was a comparison without actually posting the comparison blatantly). One person can argue that they were rejected @Quavo - this does not mean that is the status quo. Caribbean Med Schools are for profit; by definition, they are interested in making money.

Again, I wish only luck to anyone going to SGU, Ross, AUC, Windsor, [Insert X University School of Medicine here]. I was simply answering OP's question - "WAMC." To stress the answer again, chances are extremely high, especially compared with your chances at US MD/DO. I didn't mean to offend anyone.

Edit - Before you argue that because I didn't go to SGU, I don't know anything about SGU, here's a link to their own statistics - see for yourself.
Enrollment and Demographics - School of Medicine | St. George's University
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

hmania

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
May 5, 2012
Messages
276
Reaction score
82
Thank you for this, it really helps! Based on my stats do you believe if I were to do average to good on the MCAT I would be considered for Ross/SGU?

I could have been MERP, but wasn't chosen. Its all up to the admissions committee, but you probably will get in. Confidence booster here ***:highfive:

Thank you!! I’ve been reading all these comments about Caribbean from people who haven’t been and they just bash. Someone I know who’s there right now in Tennessee says that it’s nothing like these people make it out to be. Would you mind mentioning your stats and where you got rejected from/why? I’m quite nervous about my stats

So, you know someone in Tennessee who states that it's nothing like "these" people make it out to be. Let me tell you the truth... that person has not been to Dominica and studied there without the US resources that we take for granted. When there is a change in comfort food, convenience, and being on an "island", that is one more obstacle that other's who attended Ross pre-hurricane had to endure. Its not all roses lined up once they take Tennessee away (not sure when).

If you have already made up your mind about going with the strong will to make everyone on this forum see your success at the end of the four years... go do it. All you need to do is apply... the worst thing that could happen is you get a rejection. Previously, I heard that they waived the application fee... so literally, you apply and if they say no than it a no. Before applying to Ross, I applied to US school and of course denied. I buckled up and was nervous to apply to Ross for fear of rejection, but I was like... whats new, I have been rejected before.... and look at where I'm at I am the 1/500 (starting class size in May 2014) that made it through til now. My stats 3.7 sGPA and 20 MCAT.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

Apothecary Aquinas

MS4
2+ Year Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2017
Messages
282
Reaction score
634
No one here is attacking or bashing you OP. However, it is the internet so I understand how some things may come across as brash or harsh. Understand that people can and do go the Caribbean and succeed, its not unheard of. They often face many obstacles though. Whether its because they have to repeat a year, live in underprivileged island conditions, fail to match, or otherwise, you will more than certainly face obstacles you would not face in the US. In the long run, even if you succeed and graduate from a Caribbean school, what people are trying to tell you here is that you would have taken the much more difficult path that may continue to haunt you into the future. One does not have to have gone to Caribbean schools to understand the risks and to talk knowledgeably about them, this is the information age and, not to mention, books have been around for a long time... you know, that ancient method of passing on knowledge to other people who don't have said knowledge...

What we're saying is taking an extra year or two to increase your GPA and score a good MCAT will allow you to apply to DO school and potentially to some low-tier MDs. While this is not an exciting option it is, by every metric, the safer and most wise choice. You will have a much greater chance to match into a residency that you want (and on your first try) and if you're struggling you won't automatically be sent back a year or ejected.

If nothing else at least read this blog from someone who went to the Caribbean for medical school:

Million $ Mistake
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 6 users

DBC03

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2016
Messages
2,432
Reaction score
3,041
I'm not sure if the OP will be reading any of these responses, but I thought I'd come at this from a different perspective than most on this forum. I'm a much older student, matriculating in my mid-30s. So I will, somewhat unsurprisingly, say that patience and wisdom are some of the most important skills a doctor can have. You are embarking on a very long journey. If you choose primary care, you are looking at 7 years of medical school and residency. If you are looking at a specialty, add anywhere from 1 to 4 years to that. It's a long road, and that can make some people take a step back and really consider their options more carefully, but can also push others to believe they need to start as soon as possible lest they become too old before they are finished. As someone significantly older, I have had the pleasure of seeing many of my classmates go on to graduate and medical school - many are now professors and attendings. Those who went straight to medical school are unanimous in their recommendation of taking time off before entering the medical field. I have heard the same from those who went to grad school (although they are even MORE adamant that you take time off first). This is a big decision and those that enter into it straight from undergraduate years will often feel burnt out by the end of training or regret that they didn't carefully consider other options first. So my first advice is that you recognize this is a long process and you might be in a significantly better position if you wait just one more year before moving forward. You will have many more options available to you the longer you wait.

I also know quite a few successful physicians who went to Caribbean schools (three at Ross, two at St. Georges, one at St. Matthews). They all matched and are happily practicing physicians right now. One is even a professor at a solid medical program in the US and is well-respected. So there are success stories coming out of the Caribbean. However, all - ALL - of these people were significantly older when they went to medical school and had a track record of success in business and life. They were most likely picked over from US schools because of age and likely didn't apply a second cycle (I haven't discussed the ins and outs of their application cycles). It should also be noted that every single one is in a primary care position as a physician. It is extremely difficult to match into a specialty or into surgery as a Caribbean graduate. People who have a track record of success in life will likely be successful in medical school, and will probably do well in either a US or Caribbean school. But having a low GPA off the bat and no record of anything other than college grades does not indicate that you will by definition be successful. The good news is that you might be successful as a Caribbean graduate - and that would be great! Everyone on this forum, including those who are recommending you don't go in this direction - will be very happy for you. They want you to succeed. But the odds are not in your favor. Success stories are awesome, but many success stories are unique and not indicative of the general population.

If you really want to be a physician - especially if you want to be a surgeon - and if you are still young (which it sounds like you are), then you should at least take a small step back and consider a few other options. One option is to apply to an SMP and knock it out of the park. It sounds like you plan to really nail medical school - focus that energy into a one-year program with some kind of medical school linkage and show us all what you've got. Another option is what many of us have done over the years - take a year or two to complete some kind of post-baccalaureate program in upper-level science classes. Prove that you have what it takes to succeed in medical school, then apply with an upward trend, extra volunteering, amazing ECs, etc.

Taking a step back to consider other options - not necessarily to choose one of them, but at least to consider them - will show that you are introspective, thoughtful, and patient. These are very important traits for any physician and it is never too early to start developing them. I really hope for the best for you. You appear to have the drive and desire to be a physician and I would like you to consider all options before settling on one that might not put you in the best position for the future.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 3 users

altblue

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2014
Messages
1,900
Reaction score
2,587
I'm not sure if the OP will be reading any of these responses, but I thought I'd come at this from a different perspective than most on this forum. I'm a much older student, matriculating in my mid-30s. So I will, somewhat unsurprisingly, say that patience and wisdom are some of the most important skills a doctor can have. You are embarking on a very long journey. If you choose primary care, you are looking at 7 years of medical school and residency. If you are looking at a specialty, add anywhere from 1 to 4 years to that. It's a long road, and that can make some people take a step back and really consider their options more carefully, but can also push others to believe they need to start as soon as possible lest they become too old before they are finished. As someone significantly older, I have had the pleasure of seeing many of my classmates go on to graduate and medical school - many are now professors and attendings. Those who went straight to medical school are unanimous in their recommendation of taking time off before entering the medical field. I have heard the same from those who went to grad school (although they are even MORE adamant that you take time off first). This is a big decision and those that enter into it straight from undergraduate years will often feel burnt out by the end of training or regret that they didn't carefully consider other options first. So my first advice is that you recognize this is a long process and you might be in a significantly better position if you wait just one more year before moving forward. You will have many more options available to you the longer you wait.

I also know quite a few successful physicians who went to Caribbean schools (three at Ross, two at St. Georges, one at St. Matthews). They all matched and are happily practicing physicians right now. One is even a professor at a solid medical program in the US and is well-respected. So there are success stories coming out of the Caribbean. However, all - ALL - of these people were significantly older when they went to medical school and had a track record of success in business and life. They were most likely picked over from US schools because of age and likely didn't apply a second cycle (I haven't discussed the ins and outs of their application cycles). It should also be noted that every single one is in a primary care position as a physician. It is extremely difficult to match into a specialty or into surgery as a Caribbean graduate. People who have a track record of success in life will likely be successful in medical school, and will probably do well in either a US or Caribbean school. But having a low GPA off the bat and no record of anything other than college grades does not indicate that you will by definition be successful. The good news is that you might be successful as a Caribbean graduate - and that would be great! Everyone on this forum, including those who are recommending you don't go in this direction - will be very happy for you. They want you to succeed. But the odds are not in your favor. Success stories are awesome, but many success stories are unique and not indicative of the general population.

If you really want to be a physician - especially if you want to be a surgeon - and if you are still young (which it sounds like you are), then you should at least take a small step back and consider a few other options. One option is to apply to an SMP and knock it out of the park. It sounds like you plan to really nail medical school - focus that energy into a one-year program with some kind of medical school linkage and show us all what you've got. Another option is what many of us have done over the years - take a year or two to complete some kind of post-baccalaureate program in upper-level science classes. Prove that you have what it takes to succeed in medical school, then apply with an upward trend, extra volunteering, amazing ECs, etc.

Taking a step back to consider other options - not necessarily to choose one of them, but at least to consider them - will show that you are introspective, thoughtful, and patient. These are very important traits for any physician and it is never too early to start developing them. I really hope for the best for you. You appear to have the drive and desire to be a physician and I would like you to consider all options before settling on one that might not put you in the best position for the future.
OP, please listen to what DBC03 has to say. Think this through.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

laricb

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Messages
495
Reaction score
94
so I didn’t exactly have the best years in undergrad and I’m about to graduate with a 2.81 GPA
EC’s are great with internships with surgeons at MD Anderson and all of that
Worked in ER for the past 3 years at a level 1 trauma hospital, etc etc
LOR are solid as well
Haven’t taken the MCAT yet but studying hard for it!

What are my chances at Ross and SGU?

(Please don’t tell me why I shouldn’t go etc etc because i want to go in the next cycle ASAP preferably Sept 2018)
OP being a Graduate of SGU and matching into Diagnostic Radiology your dreams are possible if your willing to work at it. I studied Biomedical Engineering which caused by GPA to drop to 2.9 and with an MCAT of 26 I decided to except the Caribbean route. I started 5 yrs ago and the landscape has changed. Don't take advice from Pre-Med DO students that will also have limited choices when applying for residency. Do your own research keep reaching out to former graduates, but in the end its your decision.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users

Jz.rizvi03

New Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2018
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
OP being a Graduate of SGU and matching into Diagnostic Radiology your dreams are possible if your willing to work at it. I studied Biomedical Engineering which caused by GPA to drop to 2.9 and with an MCAT of 26 I decided to except the Caribbean route. I started 5 yrs ago and the landscape has changed. Don't take advice from Pre-Med DO students that will also have limited choices when applying for residency. Do your own research keep reaching out to former graduates, but in the end its your decision.


Thank you for your response. When exactly did you graduate and were you able to match right away?
 

laricb

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Messages
495
Reaction score
94
Thank you for your response. When exactly did you graduate and were you able to match right away?
Graduated last year about to complete my Pre-lim year and starting radiology in June. Yes I matched first time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

NotAProgDirector

Pastafarians Unite!
Staff member
Volunteer Staff
15+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2006
Messages
9,541
Reaction score
11,933
Hopefully a "fair and balanced" review of offshore schools:

The bottom line is that Carib schools (especially Med Schools) are a mixed bag. Calling them "a scam" or "a waste" is ridiculous. Saying that they are "equivalent to US schools" is also untrue:

1. They accept people who cannot get into a US medical school. Whether you see this as "giving deserving people who messed up their GPA / can't do well on the MCAT a second chance" or "leeching tuition off of desperate students who can't get into US medical schools" depends on how you view the situation.

2. Top performers in Carib schools will do fine, and be able to get mid-competitive fields /spots. Anesthesia, EM, Rads, University IM, etc. Ortho/NS/Vascular/Derm is very unlikely even for the top performers, and usually requires years of research and/or connections.

3. Middle performers will also do fine, but often end up in FM / Community IM / peds / Psych / Neuro / Path. Nothing wrong with those fields, but those attending Carib schools should understand that their choices may be limited.

4. Those at the bottom of their class, failing a class, or worse failing a step, often have much more problems. Students retake, pass, and then think everything will be OK, and it might not be. These students might still match, but it's much harder.

4b. Everyone thinks they will be in the top 25%. Only 25% can be in the top 25%. No one can tell if that's going to be you.

5. A reasonable percentage of all students starting in carib schools fail out in the first 2 years. Exactly how high that percentage is, is unclear. It clearly varies by school. Some see this as "The school takes more students than it has clinical spots for, and then fails them out to make more money". Others see it as "These schools know that some percentage of students will fail out. Rather than leave clinical spots empty, they take enough pre-clinical students so that their clinical spots are filled -- this offers the maximum number of students an opportunity to be a physician". The crux is whether the pass level is adjusted specifically to fail out people, or whether it's set at some reasonable benchmark and some people happen to fail.

The other part of this discussion usually revolves around "Well, the school takes people with very low MCAT's and then they fail out -- it's a scam and they should have a higher MCAT cutoff". Data from the LCME shows that lower MCAT scores tend to be associated with failing the USMLE. But population statistics don't tell you how any one person will do -- some people with low MCAT's do just fine. So, again, how you interpret this depends upon how you look at it.

6. Not all schools are created equal. The most established schools are SGU and Ross, and from my viewpoint the two are probably equivalent. SGU appears to be more expensive (although prices change, this may not be accurate in the future). Ross appears to take more students and appears to have a higher drop out rate, although no school publishes their drop out rate so it's hard to be certain. Ross has recently had major problems with a hurricaine severely damaging Dominica, and exactly how it is going to recover/deal with this is unclear. AUC and Saba are often included in the "top 4", AUC is on the "best/safest" (but most expensive) island (also damaged by hurricaine), and Saba is often touted as the cheapest. There are many others of varying quality -- expect higher drop out rates and worse match outcomes.

6a. If a medical school you are looking at doesn't require the MCAT, that's a very bad sign.

7. If you fail out of med school, or can't match to a residency, you really have limited options. A partial MD is of no value. An MD without a residency is also of very limited value, especially an international degree. People talk about "consulting", but I've never seen that actually happen. There are several stories of people getting jobs working for insurance companies, or state disability office, etc. These positions don't pay well, but at least they are something and might qualify for PSLF.

8. If you fail out of school, or can't find a residency because of poor performance, your loans are non-dischargable. Paying them off is very difficult. PSLF or "extreme hardship" may be able to discharge them after 10+ years. if you have a cosigner, they are on the hook just as much as you. I would not recommend that anyone go to a carib medical school if a family member / friend needs to cosign loans.

9. US med schools have increased their class size. Residency spots are also increasing slowly. So far, it hasn't been a problem. It may be that as time goes forward, that IMG's will have further trouble getting even IM and FM spots and the change might happen between the time you matriculate and graduate. But, the opposite might be true also -- spots might grow at a higher rate than students.

So: Going to a Carib school is an uphill process. You need to work harder and be better than your US colleagues to do "equally" well. Carib schools often tout their successes, and ignore the students who never make it to graduation, are only able to get a prelim spot, or not match at all. Yet, at the better carib schools, the majority of students probably succeed (again, difficult to say due to lack of transparency), mainly in the primary care fields. Advertising from these schools (on their websites) doesn't do a great job of balancing these risks and benefits. Threads on SDN tend to tout the negatives, which is probably healthy so that prospective students see the dangers involved.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 6 users

el_duderino

Some men play tennis, I erode the human soul
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2012
Messages
6,232
Reaction score
7,564
Thank you for this, it really helps! Based on my stats do you believe if I were to do average to good on the MCAT I would be considered for Ross/SGU?

Literally nothing about your academic history you've provided is consistent with medical school success. Your GPA is far far below what is typical for people who successfully navigate medical school, and you have not taken the MCAT. Your story is far more consistent with failing out of medical school than graduating and matching.

On top of that, Caribbean medical school is much harder than US schools due to the low quality of instruction, lack of academic support, and haphazard nature of rotations.

My question to you is what about your history makes YOU, let alone anyone else, think you'd be successful?
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

Goro

Full Member
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2010
Messages
68,712
Reaction score
106,549
OP being a Graduate of SGU and matching into Diagnostic Radiology your dreams are possible if your willing to work at it. I studied Biomedical Engineering which caused by GPA to drop to 2.9 and with an MCAT of 26 I decided to except the Caribbean route. I started 5 yrs ago and the landscape has changed. Don't take advice from Pre-Med DO students that will also have limited choices when applying for residency. Do your own research keep reaching out to former graduates, but in the end its your decision.

Except the posters here aren't pre-med DO students. BTW, those DO students have a > 95% of becoming doctors. Carib grads, half that. And I don't have to e a Carib student or alumnus to understand NRMP matching data, or the Program Directors survey, which, excluding uber residencies like vascular, neuro- or orthopedic surgery, tell us that PDs will much more gladly rank and interview DO grads, and more importantly are more likely to seldom or never interview/rank IMGs.

As long as you have a pulse and can write an up-front tuition check, your chances of getting into SGU or Ross are excellent.

The point here isn't that there are successful Carib grads. The point is how many additional obstacles to success you face by going to a Carib school.

Quoting the wise gyngyn: The pool of US applicants from the Caribbean is viewed differently by Program Directors. The DDx for a Caribbean grad is pretty off-putting: bad judgment, bad advice, egotism, gullibility, overbearing parents, inability to delay gratification, IA's, legal problems, weak research skills, high risk behavior. This is not to say that all of them still have the quality that drew them into this situation. There is just no way to know which ones they are. Some PD's are in a position where they need to, or can afford to take risks too! So, some do get interviews.

Bad grades and scores are the least of the deficits from a PD's standpoint. A strong academic showing in a Caribbean medical school does not erase this stigma. It fact it increases the perception that the reason for the choice was on the above-mentioned list!

Just about everyone from a Caribbean school has one or more of these problems and PDs know it. That's why their grads are the last choice even with a high Step 1 score.


There was a time when folks whose only flaw was being a late bloomer went Carib, but those days are gone. There are a number of US med schools that will reward reinvention.

It's likely you'll be in the bottom half or two thirds of the class that gets dismissed before Step 1. The business plan of a Carib school depends on the majority of the class not needing to be supported in clinical rotations. They literally can't place all 250+ of the starting class at clinical sites (educational malpractice, really). If this happened at a US school, they be shut down by LCME or COCA, and sued.

The Carib (and other offshore) schools have very tenuous, very expensive, very controversial relationships with a very small number of US clinical sites. You may think you can just ask to do your clinical rotations at a site near home. Nope. You may think you don't have to worry about this stuff. Wrong.

And let's say you get through med school in the Carib and get what you need out of the various clinical rotation scenarios. Then you are in the match gamble. I don't need to say a word about this - you can find everything you need to know at nrmp.org.

You really need to talk to people who made it through Carib threshing machine (like Skip Intro or mikkus) into residency, and hear the story from them. How many people were in their class at the start, how many are in it now? How long did it take to get a residency, and how did they handle the gap year(s) and their student loans? How many residencies did they apply to, how many interviews did they get, and were any of the programs on their match list anything like what they wanted?

A little light reading:

Million $ Mistake

Medical School at SGU

"Why didn't I Match?"
 
  • Like
Reactions: 8 users

ITSTEDDYB

Full Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2017
Messages
83
Reaction score
104
N=1 but one of the doctors that works at the hospital I'm volunteering at graduated from SGU. He did his residency in the US and is now an infectious disease physician. Dunno if he's any good cause he doesn't stick around too long but I guess he made it so it's possible!

Sent from my SM-N950U using SDN mobile
 

newsubstancep

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2010
Messages
26
Reaction score
20
Hopefully a "fair and balanced" review of offshore schools:

The bottom line is that Carib schools (especially Med Schools) are a mixed bag. Calling them "a scam" or "a waste" is ridiculous. Saying that they are "equivalent to US schools" is also untrue:

1. They accept people who cannot get into a US medical school. Whether you see this as "giving deserving people who messed up their GPA / can't do well on the MCAT a second chance" or "leeching tuition off of desperate students who can't get into US medical schools" depends on how you view the situation.

2. Top performers in Carib schools will do fine, and be able to get mid-competitive fields /spots. Anesthesia, EM, Rads, University IM, etc. Ortho/NS/Vascular/Derm is very unlikely even for the top performers, and usually requires years of research and/or connections.

3. Middle performers will also do fine, but often end up in FM / Community IM / peds / Psych / Neuro / Path. Nothing wrong with those fields, but those attending Carib schools should understand that their choices may be limited.

4. Those at the bottom of their class, failing a class, or worse failing a step, often have much more problems. Students retake, pass, and then think everything will be OK, and it might not be. These students might still match, but it's much harder.

4b. Everyone thinks they will be in the top 25%. Only 25% can be in the top 25%. No one can tell if that's going to be you.

5. A reasonable percentage of all students starting in carib schools fail out in the first 2 years. Exactly how high that percentage is, is unclear. It clearly varies by school. Some see this as "The school takes more students than it has clinical spots for, and then fails them out to make more money". Others see it as "These schools know that some percentage of students will fail out. Rather than leave clinical spots empty, they take enough pre-clinical students so that their clinical spots are filled -- this offers the maximum number of students an opportunity to be a physician". The crux is whether the pass level is adjusted specifically to fail out people, or whether it's set at some reasonable benchmark and some people happen to fail.

The other part of this discussion usually revolves around "Well, the school takes people with very low MCAT's and then they fail out -- it's a scam and they should have a higher MCAT cutoff". Data from the LCME shows that lower MCAT scores tend to be associated with failing the USMLE. But population statistics don't tell you how any one person will do -- some people with low MCAT's do just fine. So, again, how you interpret this depends upon how you look at it.

6. Not all schools are created equal. The most established schools are SGU and Ross, and from my viewpoint the two are probably equivalent. SGU appears to be more expensive (although prices change, this may not be accurate in the future). Ross appears to take more students and appears to have a higher drop out rate, although no school publishes their drop out rate so it's hard to be certain. Ross has recently had major problems with a hurricaine severely damaging Dominica, and exactly how it is going to recover/deal with this is unclear. AUC and Saba are often included in the "top 4", AUC is on the "best/safest" (but most expensive) island (also damaged by hurricaine), and Saba is often touted as the cheapest. There are many others of varying quality -- expect higher drop out rates and worse match outcomes.

6a. If a medical school you are looking at doesn't require the MCAT, that's a very bad sign.

7. If you fail out of med school, or can't match to a residency, you really have limited options. A partial MD is of no value. An MD without a residency is also of very limited value, especially an international degree. People talk about "consulting", but I've never seen that actually happen. There are several stories of people getting jobs working for insurance companies, or state disability office, etc. These positions don't pay well, but at least they are something and might qualify for PSLF.

8. If you fail out of school, or can't find a residency because of poor performance, your loans are non-dischargable. Paying them off is very difficult. PSLF or "extreme hardship" may be able to discharge them after 10+ years. if you have a cosigner, they are on the hook just as much as you. I would not recommend that anyone go to a carib medical school if a family member / friend needs to cosign loans.

9. US med schools have increased their class size. Residency spots are also increasing slowly. So far, it hasn't been a problem. It may be that as time goes forward, that IMG's will have further trouble getting even IM and FM spots and the change might happen between the time you matriculate and graduate. But, the opposite might be true also -- spots might grow at a higher rate than students.

So: Going to a Carib school is an uphill process. You need to work harder and be better than your US colleagues to do "equally" well. Carib schools often tout their successes, and ignore the students who never make it to graduation, are only able to get a prelim spot, or not match at all. Yet, at the better carib schools, the majority of students probably succeed (again, difficult to say due to lack of transparency), mainly in the primary care fields. Advertising from these schools (on their websites) doesn't do a great job of balancing these risks and benefits. Threads on SDN tend to tout the negatives, which is probably healthy so that prospective students see the dangers involved.

Very balanced/fair review of things.

As for people insulting OP's undergrad GPA and asking how he thinks he could make it in med school if he didnt do well in undergrad: I know, from personal experience, *many* people who did poorly in undergrad and shined in alternative path med schools (DO and Carib). Particularly Carib where there are almost no distractions unless you count studying on a hammock as a distraction. Undergrad poor performance is no more a marker of success as a medstudent/doctor than are your high school grades. Some people slack off from time to time, particularly people who let loose and had a little too much fun in undergrad. Only you know what you are capable of and what caused you to slip up. If you put in all your effort for a 2.8, then you probably will not make it through med school. But if you know what the source of the bad gpa is and think the distraction free atmosphere will help you shine, then go for it. It is an uphill battle, but a worthwhile one if you know what you are doing. I agree that DO options should be exhausted first though.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Princeton Medical Student

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Messages
1,325
Reaction score
3,088
OP being a Graduate of SGU and matching into Diagnostic Radiology your dreams are possible if your willing to work at it. I studied Biomedical Engineering which caused by GPA to drop to 2.9 and with an MCAT of 26 I decided to except the Caribbean route. I started 5 yrs ago and the landscape has changed. Don't take advice from Pre-Med DO students that will also have limited choices when applying for residency. Do your own research keep reaching out to former graduates, but in the end its your decision.
76 people matched diagnostic radiology from IMG in 2016. In 2018 this number is much lower. By the time you graduate the MD DO merger will likely finalize and your chances of becoming a DR are very slim. Screenshot this post and if you match DR in 4 years I will send you $100. Your impatience is going to cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars. The research clearly shows that Carib is a piss poor decision. OP however seems to have their mind set so let me preemtpively laugh when you become one of these people who ruined their life.
Getting Kicked out of a Caribbean Medical School, what now?
Dismissed from caribbean now what?
After failing to get into a residency, this new MD is going to nursing school
For every bull**** success stories that these people push there are stories like this
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top