Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

Dismiss Notice
Hey Texans—join us for a DFW meetup! Click here to learn more.

DMU pros/cons

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by docmd2010, Nov 26, 2005.

  1. docmd2010

    docmd2010 Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2005
    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    2
    So i've only heard good things about dmu... I was hoping that we could start a discussion exactly what are the good and bad things about the place...I haven't interviewed there yet but am curious to know...!
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. OSUdoc08

    OSUdoc08 Membership Revoked
    Removed

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    Messages:
    7,698
    Likes Received:
    6
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Con: In Iowa (my school has a similar con, but I ended up there anyway...if I went on location, I'd be at AZCOM right now)
     
  4. Doctor Bagel

    Doctor Bagel so cheap and juicy
    Moderator Emeritus 15+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2002
    Messages:
    10,919
    Likes Received:
    1,114
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    the big con would probably be that most students have to relocate for rotations. also, dmu gives a ton of flexibility with rotations, which is probably too unstructured for some people. at 200, the class size is bigger, and yeah, iowa.

    pros are that the school is in a nice neighborhood and has very nice facilities. big omm emphasis (well, that's either a pro or a con depending on how you look at it), good comlex pass rates and scores (average comlex score is about 30 points above the nationwide average), friendly people, good reputation, relatively updated curriculum, good use of technology (all classes are recorded and available on mp3).
     
  5. smithj16

    smithj16 Junior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    other than education at the school...it has a great workout facility and a very nice cafeteria. No dress code as well. There is living right across from campus too.

    DMU has an operating room setup with three beds in it and a laproscopic machine. Also has HARVY, which is a really cool machine that allows you to listen to different heart sounds (good tool for future diagnosing). The OMM lab is smaller than other school so you really get close to the instructor.

    The students were very happy with their choice to be there and the faculty was very nice.
     
  6. docmd2010

    docmd2010 Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2005
    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    2
    what do you mean no dress code? do med schools have a dress code for going to class? or is dress code mean something else?
     
  7. Doctor Bagel

    Doctor Bagel so cheap and juicy
    Moderator Emeritus 15+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2002
    Messages:
    10,919
    Likes Received:
    1,114
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    lots of schools have dress codes. lecom has a pretty formal code, where men have to wear tears. no jeans, no shorts, etc. nsucom requires either professional dress (probably more on the business casual side) or scrubs, and kcumb has a similar requirement (although i think less enforced).
     
  8. docmd2010

    docmd2010 Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2005
    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    2
  9. docmd2010

    docmd2010 Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2005
    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    2


    Hey exlawgirl,
    it's pretty cool that med schools have a dress code, that's cool that they have a professional dress code for professional school. im a big fan of dressing up, especially when women dress up. :thumbup:
     
  10. crys20

    crys20 make it happen!
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    Messages:
    1,130
    Likes Received:
    1
    pros: facilities, OMM, facilities, facilities, facilities :)

    cons: tuition, location, travel during clinical years, small school feel
     
  11. DORocksMySocks

    DORocksMySocks Poop Is Funny!
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2005
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    KCUMB requires either business casual with a white coat or scrubs...no writing on the clothing (unless it is medically related....I think...because I saw several students with KCUMB clothing)
     
  12. HooahDOc

    Physician 15+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2003
    Messages:
    5,731
    Likes Received:
    825
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I think because of the debt, hard work, and lack of social life, both the men and women will be wearing tears. ;)
     
  13. OSUdoc08

    OSUdoc08 Membership Revoked
    Removed

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    Messages:
    7,698
    Likes Received:
    6
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I seriously doubt you are required to wear a white coat to class.
     
  14. lars1297

    lars1297 Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2005
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Just to clear up some of the misunderstandings posted on this website...I am a 2nd year at DMU and just received my rotation assignments and am able to stay in Des Moines. Just because you come to DMU does NOT mean that you have to relocate for rotations... you have the choice of going to many areas, including Idaho, Wyoming, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Michigan, Ohio, Philadelphia, Florida, etc...
    and one more thing... being in Iowa doesn't necessarily have to be "con"...it's better than you might think! :D
     
  15. jbone

    jbone Herro!
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2005
    Messages:
    2,274
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Good to know...Thanks! :thumbup:
     
  16. Old_Mil

    Old_Mil Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    Messages:
    2,018
    Likes Received:
    481
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Pros: Facilities, Location (don't have to deal with the cost of living in Metropolis), Good Neighborhood, Lots of affordable housing nearby, No dress code, great administrative staff, great professors, rotations in many places, lectures recorded as MP3s & great integration of technology into the curriculum.

    Cons: (over)emphasis on OMM, integrated gross anatomy & embryology course, flights out of Des Moines tend to be a bit more expensive if you live elsewhere and fly home, and it's 7 degrees right now.
     
  17. jbone

    jbone Herro!
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2005
    Messages:
    2,274
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Ouch!! 7 degrees? Shrivilage!! :eek:
     
  18. cmeshy

    cmeshy Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2005
    Messages:
    58
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I've got a quick comment to make that I always seem to read about the negative aspect of attending DMU. Location??? I find it hard to imagine that everyone applying to med school or DMU is from some huge city woopin it up everynight and would find des moines to be boring. It is no NYC, but come on, there is only one NYC. If anyone would do a little investigating they would find out that des moines is a CITY of 500,000 or so. I spent three days there for my interview and ate at great coffee shops and cafes downtown and read about tons of new developments throughout the city, especially downtown. For example: the Wells Fargo Arena (for concerts), brand new state-of-the-art downtown library, river and lake running trails, skywalk golfing, tons of renovated historic lofts to rent or own, farmers market for awesomly fresh produce, botanical garden, arts fesitivals and galleries, racing events (1/2s and full marathons), plus anything you can imagine style of restaurant or bar. All of this is just TWO miles from the school which is walkable and easily done on a bike if you don't want to drive to school. I personally plan on living downtown where everything you can imagine is in walking distance and so I can get my space from school.
    Now for the school since I'm at it already. The facilities are prisitine and it looks as though parking will never be a problem. Located in a upscale neighborhood (huge old Victorian and Colonial style homes set on huge lots) you'll find lots of parks and clean green areas. The school is also close to the interstate so home buyers looking in the more upscale or affordable suburbia neighborhoods would never be more than 15 minutes by car. My hotel was way out on the west side of town near a huge mall and new homes and I still got to school in the morning during rush hour (also got lost) in under 20 minutes. The midwest has brutal winters but the campus is completely connected with interior walkways to protect you from the elements. I've been to quite a few interviews and I still think that DMU has one the most advanced technology adapted campuses, integrated curriculums, and plenty of private rooms and cozy spots for those long nights of studying. For the gym buffs, those facilities are fantastic as well. By far the best gym I have seen on a private campus. All the students I met were down-to-earth and hard working. But they also appeared to be in love with life as much as with their studies. I found this trait to be important to me as I still plan on having a life while I attend school. Work hard then play hard. So good luck to all those waiting and soon to be interviewed. I don't think you'll be disappointed. ------>One last thing. If you have heard that the interviews at DMU are strange, you are correct. I left the conference room a little disappointed and confused at my performance. Don't look for lots of feedback during the questioning. You may even get interviewers who desperately look as though they wish they were somewhere else. Yes it was unprofessional and intimidating. But I overlooked that one aspect and enjoyed my stay. Good Luck and look forward to sharing a cold one over the biochemisty blues...
     
  19. FS-Pro

    FS-Pro Guest

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2004
    Messages:
    374
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Awesome post, thanks for all the info. Of those planning on attending an interview, just realize that not all interviews are strange as I had a very good experience.
     
  20. jbone

    jbone Herro!
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2005
    Messages:
    2,274
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Well said. :thumbup:
     
  21. fitnessexpert

    fitnessexpert Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2005
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    First of all, Iowa is not a horrible state to live in. I have lived here all my life and have not had frostbite and/or hypothermia, and I work OUTSIDE. The midwest is about the only place in the US with 4 seasons. Yes, it gets cold but you can deal with it. Invest in a parka and some thinsulate gloves and you won't have a problem. There is plenty to do in Des Moines. You just have to look a little harder than in a large city. We have a GREAT downtown, pretty good Metro system, good Zoo, amusement park, great stadium for sports and concerts, great FOOD, and the list goes on. They are currently building the only apes facility in the WORLD to have all types of apes. Good nightlife, great midwestern attitudes, burning leaves, jumping in the leaf pile before you burn them, low low low cost of living, snow angels and snowball fights, hot summers, cuddling with a good cup of cocoa and your medical school books, art festivals, food festivals (after all Midwesterns are the fattest),great parking, and great living. I know some of these are simple and "midwestern minded" but I guess I am biased. My request is that people don't use "Iowa" as an excuse to not come to DMU. DMU is amazing!!
     
  22. Archer14

    Archer14 Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Earlier in the thread old mil stated he felt the school placed to much emphasis on OMM. Could anyone else, or even old mil for that matter, attending DMU elaborate upon this point?
     
  23. FrkyBgStok

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2005
    Messages:
    4,697
    Likes Received:
    558
    MDApps:
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    i grew up in des moines my entire life, and for a short period lived in the appartments at 3000 grand (which is literally one block away from DMU) next to students.

    Des Moines has about 400,000-500,000 including the suburbs. We are not 2 years behind like south park, but it is a little smaller area so we are a little more old fashion. The summers are very hot and humid and the winters are very cold and dry. We have plenty of bars, night clubs, etc. however none would fall into the category of anything in any kind of movie. typically clubs are packed at 100 people. great restaurants and coffee bars, fun stuff to do during the day. We have art festivals, food festivals, and many concerts down by the river. just got a new semi pro hockey team (iowa stars) and have a semi pro baseball team. so it really isn't that bad.

    and it really is cheap!
     
  24. misparas

    misparas Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    571
    Likes Received:
    0
    The city of Des Moines stood out to me as a real selling point for the school. It's big enough that there is alot of cool stuff going on, but it's small enough that the cost of living is low. I've only been there 2 times but was really impressed. The housing next to the school was also a big positive for me. Not to mention that the school and facilities are amazing!
     
  25. Mad Cow

    Mad Cow Boneopath
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    143
    Likes Received:
    0
    hey,
    I'm a first year at dmu with ol mil. We earn 5 credits for our year long OMM course. We meet for 1.5 hours/week for lecture and 1.5 hours/week for lab. This really isn't that big a dent in our time. I am not going to try to read old millys mind, so I won't. To be good at omm, which i'm not claiming to be yet, it takes practice outside of the classroom. The more you do anything, the better you get. I don't think we are expected to be overly fantastic at this stuff and we are not tested on it heavily, one written exam and two practicals/semester. So, those are the facts as I see em. oh, plus quizzes every couple of lectures on the class previous.
    :mad: :horns:
     
  26. Archer14

    Archer14 Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Ok, in another threat the structure, or lack therof, of clinical rotations at DMU was mentioned. Can anyone now attending DMU chime in on this topic?
     
  27. lars1297

    lars1297 Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2005
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    On the contrary, DMU rotations are structured perfectly. 3rd year, you are assigned to an advisor that makes all calls for you... all you have to do is pick your 1st choices for hospital and clinic. 4th year you get to choose alot of your own, I think, but again... your advisor makes all calls for you. BAsically, you find a place you're interested in for electives, tell your advisor, and they will make calls to see if its possible.
     
  28. javandane

    javandane He's so hot right now
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2003
    Messages:
    263
    Likes Received:
    0
  29. doc2010

    doc2010 Say what????
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  30. kahoo99

    kahoo99 Senior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2004
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    0
    sometimes wanting to do an allopathic residency is about location.
     
  31. It'sElectric

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    1,502
    Likes Received:
    6
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Ya think?? I thought that was pretty much how 90% of med schools ran their first 2 years. It's not pleasant, but that's how it works.

    On another note, it's my honest belief that you will be as well prepared for your boards as you try to be. I think we should all take a bit of responsibility for ourselves and realize we make our future when it comes down to it. Also, doesn't DMU provide a free Kaplan course for students in order to prepare for Boards???
     
  32. javandane

    javandane He's so hot right now
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2003
    Messages:
    263
    Likes Received:
    0
  33. Dotsero

    Dotsero Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    1
    "Major research univeristy" huh? Well laudee-freekin-dah!! I am also a 1st year at DMU and say that the faculty here is top notch. They are very knowledgeable on their topics, fair in their testing and very approachable when you have a question. As for your critique of the testing at DMU, I would challenge you to find any med school (DO or MD) that tests differently. They are preparing us for the boards, which are standardized, and standardized tests, test you on your test taking ability (i.e. 2nd and 3rd order questions).

    DMU is top notch and I would place the education I am receiving here against any school!
     
  34. Old_Mil

    Old_Mil Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    Messages:
    2,018
    Likes Received:
    481
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    If you wanted to practice manipulative medicine, why didn't you go to chiropractor school? Such questions are counterproductive, so how about we stop asking them? If OMT has worth, it doesn't need an inquisitorial council to guard its future.

    That having been said, lets face the facts: If every osteopathic medical school dropped the allopathic portion of their curriculum, the majority of them would be out of business within a decade. On the other hand, if every osteopathic medical school dropped the manipulative portion of their curriculum, things would continue on their present course without so much as a hiccup (well, other than the powers that be at the AOA having a collective MI). Additionally, 90% of DOs in practice don't practice OMT. When discussing the future of "the profession", we should never lose sight of these realities.

    I feel that OMT is over-emphasized because: All the practicals are cumulative and the course lasts two full years. Maybe this is true of all DO schools - I don't know the specifics of their curricula. The end result is that people who know they aren't going to practice OMT have to spent valuable study time learning something not relevant to their future practices. This isn't necessarily a complaint that DMU requires too much time per week in lab/OMM class when compared to other schools.
     
  35. javandane

    javandane He's so hot right now
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2003
    Messages:
    263
    Likes Received:
    0

    flamer
     
  36. It'sElectric

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    1,502
    Likes Received:
    6
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Once again, it's my understanding that the Step I is very memorization based and basically revolves around the sciences. Whereas the Step II will revolve more around analytical thinking and one's clinical skills. Hence the reason that Step I is taken at the end of the 2nd year and Step II in the 3rd year.

    Don't get me wrong, I hate the stupid memorization and regurgitation sh1t just as much as the next person, but that's just how it is. You are the first and ONLY person from DMU to ever dismiss the faculty like you did. Maybe you have had some negative experiences with certain faculty, but the vast majority seem to feel differently than yourself. Anyways, I wish you the best of luck throughout school, and I am confident that if you put the effort forward, you will do fantastic throughout school and on the Boards.
     
  37. USArmyDoc

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2005
    Messages:
    2,356
    Likes Received:
    5
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I am surprised to see that there are some people upset with DMU, but I guess that goes on anywhere. I really liked it and feel I would be thrilled to go there! :)
     
  38. jbone

    jbone Herro!
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2005
    Messages:
    2,274
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    See you there doc! First negative response I have ever heard about the school. Good to know but someone took a turd in his/her cheerios. I feel sorry for the fact that he's "wasting" $51,000 per year on such a "sub-par" education. Wow, life sucks for you. :thumbdown: I guess too each his own. And this one is appropriate: "he who farts in church, sits in his own pew" :eek: . You chose the school, you supposedly researched the school, so it's really your own fault you don't like it. So sit and breath deeply. +pity+
     
  39. Archer14

    Archer14 Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Hey old mil, it sounds like you are bitter about the fact that you ended up in an osteopathic school? Why don't you embrace the things you are being taught that make you different from your allopathic counterparts? If you really feel that OMM has so little value what in the heck are you doing spending time and money at a school that you knew taught it?
     
  40. somnolent

    somnolent Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2005
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I, for the most part, disagree. I can see where you are coming from, but this is the same old story. What's the point of year 1 and 2? Does a high MCAT make you a better doctor? OMM is for the birds. Some questions will never be answered and some people will never be happy.
    First of all, I am not sure how you decided that our texts are second-rate. I don't think we are ordering old editions off of ebay. They seem pretty standard to me. (although i rarely use them, and do just fine)

    I have noticed some of the faculty side-stepping when asked a question, but i think that the majority of the questions are clinically related. And guess who the professors are.......Phd's. I can't really blame them. Yes, it would be great to have a faculty full of MDs and DOs, but that didn't change from when you got accepted here to when you matriculated. Also, it seems if the question isn't out of the PhD's realm of knowledge, it isn't important for the lecture at hand. And i am glad that they skim over it.

    as far as preparing us for boards, we have been scoring over national average as a school, so i don't think that is a problem.

    p.s. plagiarize? i think that they site their sources fairly well. these basic sciences have been around for awhile, it might be hard to come up with original material. and that new anatomy teacher from the street, i heard he taught at NYU last year. (may not be true, i'll check)
     
  41. somnolent

    somnolent Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2005
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    i better respond to another classmate of mine (i even know who this one is) I don't think that we over-emphasize compared to other schools, but i realize that's not your point. i'll get to that. When i looked at other DO schools, dmu was in the minority in that it had such small lab groups. I really don't think i would learn as well in a very large room looking from a distance. My thinking was, if i'm gonna learn it, i want to know it. or something like that. From the sounds of it, we don't put in more time, we just have more direct learning. Thats part of the reason why we are known as one of the top OMM schools.

    As far as over-emphasizing OMM because only a handful of us will use it in the future, i would say that on most days i bet i would want to know functional anatomy better than some minute details in biochemistry. Everything's directed towards the boards. I think that the cummulative testing only helps in doing well on COMLEX. and no matter how much someone might not like the osteopathic profession or the aoa or omm, we're gonna have to pass that test. If we keep reviewing OMM in class, that means i have more out of class time to study for other topics that we finished 1st semester of the first year. my 2 pennies. take them, or ignore them, whatever.
     
  42. jbone

    jbone Herro!
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2005
    Messages:
    2,274
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Well said. Thanks. :thumbup:
     
  43. javandane

    javandane He's so hot right now
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2003
    Messages:
    263
    Likes Received:
    0
  44. USArmyDoc

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2005
    Messages:
    2,356
    Likes Received:
    5
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Dude, I appreciate your opinion as I am in the process of picking which school I would want to attend. However, DMU gives a first-rate appearance on interview day. I really don't see how the education can be "subpar." With that being said, it may be good to have this discussion because everyone seems to pro-DMU (me for one!).
     
  45. javandane

    javandane He's so hot right now
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2003
    Messages:
    263
    Likes Received:
    0
  46. cmeshy

    cmeshy Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2005
    Messages:
    58
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Just a few words in my opinion and from what i've seen from students at two other medical (allo) schools with whom I am good friends. Your first two years will be taught mostly by PhD's not MDs or DOs and they will have little knowledge on clinical applications. Nor should they. They are there to teach a science course, not medicine. Later you will understand and hopefully be able to bring that science course knowledge to work for you in your practice. However, if they don't know anything beyond what is being taught in the current subject, which they should be skilled in, and it is relative to what's at hand or is important, then I would be concerned. Also your first two years will be mostly a mass quantity of absorption with little anything else. And yes, memorization of NEW material is what this is all about. You can't expect to go see patients right now and be able make decisions on their condition without the proper backbone of knowledge that is necessary. And that knowledge is book knowledge and yes is mostly just reading, remembering, and regurgitating. Leave the latter part of your education to the time where you will be expected to use compounding thoughts and ideas to come up with a legitimate answer to a problem (what you consider analytical thinking). This kind of training is universal anymore in all medical schools. You must crawl before you can walk. I believe schools that put students to early in front of patients wastes time that they could be getting a better basic science education and therefore do better on their boards. From the stats that I have read, DMU has a good tradition on pass rates and above average scores on the COMLEX, which is probably the most important factor in choosing a school. You MUST pass the boards and do WELL if you want to do anything competitive in medicine. Every school has its ups and downs and that is for sure. But they are mostly equivalent as well, regulatory boards make sure of this. All I can suggest is try to make the best of things and by all means get something out of what you are doing right now. Memorization and dumping the material after the exams will be detrimental to your future, your reputation, and the schools if you don't retain anything being taught, even if it is 2nd rate.
     
  47. It'sElectric

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    1,502
    Likes Received:
    6
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    That's just the thing....you're original post attempted to come off as fact, and I think that is what's pissing people off. You could've gone about it in a much more tactful way that would've possibly (although unlikely on SDN) resulted in a more lively discussion. Instead, you came off as though you just got back from getting your ass kicked on a test and were venting as a direct result of that. Fact: First 2 years of med school are NOT fun. You will do sciences, sciences, sciences, but people must see that it's absolutely fundamental to the later clinical skills.

    Anyways, I don't know why I'm still responding to this thread, but I'm here at work bored as hell, and it's the only thing keeping me awake.
     
  48. Old_Mil

    Old_Mil Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    Messages:
    2,018
    Likes Received:
    481
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I'm not at all bitter about attending an osteopathic medical school. When I applied to medical school, I made the decision based on the school, its location, its facilities, and its people. DMU is excellent in all these areas. If you notice my original post, there were far more positives than negatives.

    Regarding OMT - I shadowed three DOs before enrolling. All three basically practiced "allopathic" medicine and did not practice OMT. In addition, my personal physician is a DO (DMU grad). He also has chosen not to practice OMT. To summarize, I have a good idea of what role OMT plays in the medical practices of modern osteopathic physicians. All I'm saying is that it would be in our best interests as future doctors if the curriculum were tweaked to reflect these realities.

    As far as our faculty goes - they're excellent lecturers, know the subject matter, are approachable, and willing to help. No complaints.

    This is a great school to go to - don't let the one or two things that could be done better convince you differently. If anything, the fact that we're willing to discuss such things openly and honestly should encourage you to come here. No institution is perfect - but DMU actually does comes pretty close from a student's perspective.
     
  49. kahoo99

    kahoo99 Senior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2004
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm glad we have a dissenting opinion on board. And I'm a little embarassed so many people are shouting him or her down.
     
  50. Dotsero

    Dotsero Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    1
    Do you truly think other schools are any different (DO or MD)? How can one possibly understand and grasp all the details in 10 lectures/chapters of immunology over the course of 2 weeks. you can't. This is just the nature of med school. Just one more hoop to jump through on your way to becoming a doctor. The next hoop will be the boards, followed by shelf exams during clinicals etc... What med school does for you is provide a BASIC foundation on which to build a medical practice. It is not geared to allow you to mull over all the details of the Krebs cycle or the primary immune response. You are right, its really just a binge and purge situation. Accept it and your life will be much easier.
     
  51. It'sElectric

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    1,502
    Likes Received:
    6
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Other than 1 or 2 individuals, I really didn't think people attacked him too harshly. I love to hear dissenting opinions (without them, the world would never really progress). Neverthless, it's the way in which he/she went about their dissenting opinion....You can seriously almost taste the bitterness in their mouth after the words were spewed out. The post was in no way objective. He/She even accused DMU of hiring people off the street (I understand humor and wit, but that was lacking in both). I just wanted to clarify that.
     

Share This Page