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"Help me decide" mega thread

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by IcedBennu, Mar 23, 2012.

  1. _Sunny

    _Sunny

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    Hey, I'm in a similar boat as HMarie, only it's La Salle vs. Widener. The schools are comparable in terms of location (both in the Philly area) and are similar in price (although Widener is a bit more expensive). Would love to hear advice, particularly from folks who have experience with either program. I'm aware of the outcomes/stats of each school, so I would prefer advise that's beyond what's on the website.
     
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  3. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist Psychologist 7+ Year Member

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    Somewhere
    Depends on what your career goals are.
     
  4. _Sunny

    _Sunny

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    I'm interested in child psych, and would like to eventually work in a clinic or integrated hospital setting. I know that may be a little vague - let me know if there's anything specific that'd be helpful for you to know about my goals.
     
  5. 1101psych

    1101psych

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    I'm deciding between University of Denver and Roosevelt for my PsyD. While I know there is a big difference in price, I am trying to make my decision based on all other factors.

    Any initial thoughts on which program to choose? From the interview day, Roosevelt seems like a more rigorous program, but I love the city of Denver so much. Other thoughts: Roosevelt's program is small, which is nice for faculty/student relationships, but perhaps not the best in terms of making new friends. Thoughts?
     
  6. sabine_psyd

    sabine_psyd

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    Check on APA match rates for the two programs. Find out if they have the type of practicum experiences you're looking for that are congruent with your goals.

    I personally wouldn't rely much on what city I like better. It's grad school and you will be busy. Look at cost of living though as a factor.


    Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
     
  7. singasongofjoy

    singasongofjoy Psychologist 2+ Year Member

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    I second the above poster re: don't think about city. You'll be so busy it doesn't matter one bit (I mean, unless you're going to Alaska and then the whole not seeing the sun for months thing...) I went to school in a city that really does NOT suit me, but still didn't matter because I had such little free time that there was always something fun to do (and the low cost of living was a bonus). Spent all my time on campus/practicum or holed up in coffee shops with other grad students writing papers. You can do that in any city. Go for quality of training / experience. Shoot for cities you like to live in for postdoc.
     
  8. singasongofjoy

    singasongofjoy Psychologist 2+ Year Member

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    .
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2017
  9. Lister826

    Lister826

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    Hello everyone,

    It may already be evident by the title of the thread, but I need help deciding between two PhD programs - Yeshiva & Adelphi.

    I'm not really sure if one is better than the other, and after factoring in the scholarships I was offered, the cost isn't much different either. According to one member here, out of all the New York schools, only Fordham produces good psychologists anyway.

    I heard Yeshiva students potentially fair better on externships and internships because they are taught CBT and have exposure to other modalities while Adelphi students are mainly limited to the psychodynamic approach.

    Anyway, what do you guys think?
     
  10. singasongofjoy

    singasongofjoy Psychologist 2+ Year Member

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    I can't speak much to either of these programs but I think a program that gives you exposure to a broader array of modalities as well as CBT training may allow you more flexibility in the future, especially geographically. Consider also the population you think you might be most interested in working with. For example, you won't be doing any serious psychodynamic sessions with someone with developmental disability, but CBT is v. applicable. That'd be my choice if I were deciding between the two based on those factors but I'm decidedly not psychodynamic in orientation.
     
  11. Lister826

    Lister826

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    I did a Masters before getting into a PhD program and I kind of wish I didn't. I think taking a year in between to study for the GRE and do more research is just as valuable as doing all that while in a Masters program, but WAY cheaper. Besides, you would probably get in with your current stats.
     
    DailyJoy likes this.
  12. Thinkin ahead

    Thinkin ahead

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    Mar 7, 2017
    Hofstra PhD or PGSP-Stanford PsyD?
     
  13. sabine_psyd

    sabine_psyd

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  14. redhead223344

    redhead223344

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    What is your funding situation?? Xavier provides a first year graduate assistantship with partial tuition and $8.10 an hour (8 hrs/wk). You will still need to come up with a significant amount of $$ per month to cover your expenses that are not covered by federal loans. They do not care about your financial situation and are extremely unhelpful/rude in this regard. The program itself is good, but it is geared to rich, white kids. If you do not fit this description, I would suggest looking elsewhere. Multiple students have brought this to the faculty's attention and it has become very obvious that they do not care.

    Further, you will not be exposed to any CBT-focused courses until later in your training and the prof who teaches this is said to be horrible. The first and second years are primarily psychodynamic focused. Kind of irritated with this program after my first year (can you tell??). REALLY wish I had accepted my offer to IUP. They do have a good practicum program where they match you to various sites in the area, and the program has a great reputation in the Cincinnati area. Hope this helps!
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2017
  15. atroposlachesis

    atroposlachesis

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    Hi all! I don't know if anyone else has covered this exact topic before, so here goes my strange disjointed question.

    I minored in Psych in college, but didn't do too well thanks to an untreated medical condition. After treatment, I then received my Master's in Counseling, which I did very well in. Halfway through, I realized I actually had a passion for research, and starting volunteering at a community action research institute. I was actually published as a co-author in an APA textbook.

    I would like to go more in-depth into research, as well as expand my toolbox as I've always felt very limited by classic counseling talk therapy modalities. This started my interest in Occupational Therapy. I'm lucky enough to have been accepted to the top OT program in the country and will be participating in research there. But I still have my doubts. As I read through my textbooks for next year, I find myself coming back to the brain and topics in neuropsychology every single time. I am so profoundly fascinated by the myenteric "gut brain" connection and its role in mental health disorders. I think there is so much ripe opportunity for research in this area and I would love to be a part of it.

    Sooo...that takes me to my big question. If you were me, what would you do? Would you go into OT, with relative job security? Or go into neuropsychology with all of its hassles, competition, but access to fascinating research?

    Thank you in advance for any thoughts!
     
  16. sabine_psyd

    sabine_psyd

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    I am not familiar with OT, so I can't address that specifically. I think that it is important to do some self reflection and through that process differentiate your passions, your interests, and what is a reasonable and feasible career goal. I hope this response isn't too generic, and it is based on my own experiences trying to figure out if clinical psychology was the best career goal for me. In college I had to decide among psychology, pharmacy, and medicine. I found that psychology worked best for me because I wanted to focus on assessment and intervention, and believed that for me psychology had more of a focus on the human condition as opposed to my two other aforementioned interests. I also wanted to have time to devote to my child, and psychology permits that more than medicine.

    It is definitely important to think of the pros and cons of your two career options. I think it is definitely important to consider that you have been accepted into the top OT program. Congrats!! That is an amazing accomplishment, and that would likely open up amazing opportunities for job placement into excellent institutions. An accomplishment like that, along with the career opportunities that would lead to, should not be given up without serious self reflection and time.


    Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
     
  17. MamaPhD

    MamaPhD Psychologist, Academic Medical Center Psychologist 7+ Year Member

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    These are not closely related career choices, so I think it comes down to what you value most. Research careers are difficult to enter and sustain but some people have the drive and risk tolerance for it. There are a lot of OTs working in quasi-mental health roles, and a small number doing research, but there really isn't much of a role for OT in gut-brain disorders. You might consider clinical health psychology programs as an alternative.
     
    atroposlachesis likes this.
  18. pandapanda

    pandapanda

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    I have not applied, but I am in the process of deciding which of the three PsyD programs to eliminate from my list: LaSalle, Widener, and Denver (I am for sure applying to PGSP & Rutgers).

    Does anyone have any thoughts, perhaps even regarding the location? I would like to gain information that's not on their websites already.

    Are there research assistantships opportunities at all? What is the atmosphere like? Do students maintain a positive relationship with the faculty? Is the internship matching process competitive?

    P.S. If it matters my GPA is 3.8, GRE Verbal 94%, Quant 81%, AW 60%.
     
  19. psych.meout

    psych.meout 2+ Year Member

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    Why aren't you applying to any PhD programs?
     
  20. pandapanda

    pandapanda

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    I am applying to 4 PhD programs. But those are easier to narrow down due to the need to match research interests with the faculty.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2018
  21. chicandtoughness

    chicandtoughness 2+ Year Member

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    Dec 7, 2014
    Not sure if it matters, but Widener has a captive internship. That may be a pro or a con, depending on whether you'd like to do all your training at the local facilities or not.
     
  22. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist Psychologist 7+ Year Member

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    Somewhere
    Con
     
    psych.meout likes this.
  23. psych.meout

    psych.meout 2+ Year Member

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    I'm pretty gaming the internship match system with a (2-year half-time!) captive internship site, because their applicants aren't good enough to compete with applicants from other programs is big 'ol con.
     
  24. pandapanda

    pandapanda

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    Yeah, I actually decided to take Widener off my list. I felt that the curriculum wasn't too challenging and I had mixed feelings about the captive internship system.
     
  25. himala

    himala

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    I would go with APA internship match rates (want to really get an APA accredited one and therefore be able to have better chance at competitive postdocs, jobs, etc.). Locations is bottom priority because you will be way too busy anyways.
     
  26. ctpsy11

    ctpsy11

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    I don't know. I got a few grad school offers to solid clinical PhD programs and decided to go with my intuition about which school was best based on interview and how it felt, etc -- instead of picking a school with a more prestigious name and a better location. In the end of the day I was pretty busy/miserable at the less good school I had felt so good about during interviews...sometimes i wonder if i made the right choice? California sure would've been nice...
     
  27. hurricanesum1

    hurricanesum1

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    Just wondering your thoughts on Pepperdine Psy.D.. generally good reputation? Do people tend to roll their eyes at someone with this degree behind closed doors, as they might with those who have degrees from Alliant/Agrosy/Chicago School? I do qualify for tuition aid, so I am concerned more about having a useful and respected degree at the end of five years. Thanks for your help.
     
  28. artsyann

    artsyann

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    Dec 21, 2017
    It's a very conservative and religious school. If you are okay with that you may like it. Just know that going in.
     
  29. psych.meout

    psych.meout 2+ Year Member

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    How much "tuition aid" are you talking about?

    Scholarships - Pepperdine University - Graduate School of Education and Psychology

    PsyD in Clinical Psychology | Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology Degree Program | Pepperdine University GSEP

    82*$1,510 = $123,820
    $123,820 * 0.75 = $92,865

    $92,865 for tuition alone is still quite expensive after scholarships are applied.
     
    Therapist4Chnge likes this.
  30. Elizabeth1444

    Elizabeth1444

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    MDApps:
    MDApps:
    It's funny - discuss a problem in 5 years)
    This boy maybe has finished studying at all. But I want to say my opinion.
    I want to wish all students to believe only their inner voice and go to the institution that is closer to your liking. Very often relatives, parents are mistaken, and we spend a lot of time in the empty. Because of personal experience, I can say that it's very sad, to realize after 5 years of training that everything was in vain.;););)
     
  31. psych.meout

    psych.meout 2+ Year Member

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    huh?
     

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