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"Help me decide" mega thread

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by IcedBennu, Mar 23, 2012.

  1. wtfook

    2+ Year Member

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    Honestly, my guess is that most of the people DON'T actually want to stay in Arizona and so are matching at places outside of Arizona on purpose and not because they couldn't find something in the state. Clinical PhD programs especially (less so for PsyD) tend to attract younger people who are in their mid to late 20s when facing internship year. Most of those people aren't restricted geographically due to family, spouses, etc... and so are highly interested in exploring another area of the country for a year and are highly likely to want to go after a major city or just not the general state where they did their degree.

    If Arizona were a highly competitive area like major cities (Chicago, NYC, Philly, LA, SF, etc...) then I'd say it's cuz it's just freakin hard but honestly Arizona isn't a highly sought after region for internships. 10 for the entire state is VERY low. I'm pretty sure any of the cities I listed above easily have 10 or even 20 in various areas of psychology (college counseling, VA, hospital, outpatient, etc...). So another reason might just be that Arizona does not have that many sites and so people match outside of Arizona because whatever is available in Arizona got snatched up by a student from a different school. You have to consider the fact that there are many different types of internship sites. If you want to do assessment work with adults, you'd probably wanna apply to a hospital or VA setting. There might only be 3-5 of those in Arizona and people typically apply to 17 internships. Then of those 3-5 sites, maybe only 3 actually match with your experience and expertise, and maybe only 1 puts you as their first choice. So even if you ranked ALL 3 as your top 3 and one maybe in Nevada or Colorado as your 4th, it's possible you'll end up in a different state due to the lack of sites in Arizona.
     
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  3. MHlady2014

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    Hey this is really helpful! Thanks so much!
     
  4. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
    Psychologist 7+ Year Member

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    ASU and UA are the only reputable schools in AZ. The others are predatory diploma mills. Many of us making clinical internships will not consider internship/postdoc applications from the diploma mills. Check out the accredited match rates on APPIC for verification of this.
     
    psych.meout likes this.
  5. wtfook

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    Yeah no problem! I can feel your pain when it comes to needing to stay in a certain geographic region. It's something I'm thinking about a lot, even though I'm a couple years away from internship year. On one hand you've got your career to think about that you've worked really hard for. On the other you have loved ones or other obligations that necessitate you stick around. And sometimes the ideal situation may not arise. It's tough for sure.
     
  6. The_Random_Casual

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    Hello, this is my first post here and I have been struggling to find some recent information on some schools I am thinking of applying to. I am hoping this forum can help me out and perhaps share some opinions on what's up. I just recently got my bachelors in psychology, and I am hoping to apply to graduate programs over this coming fall. I have a few researched, and in fact I am going to take my GRE today...of which I am not too confident, but we all got to do what we all got to do.

    Regarding specific schools. I live in Southern California, and there are a few campuses near me that I am hoping to collect data on. Does anyone have any experiences with the Chicago School of Professional Psychology or John F. Kennedy University? From what I can tell, they both have many reviews both in support of them or against them. Ranging from systemic and shady practices, or actually not too bad, or decent. Like, I am going to be talking to some enrollment advisors and I think I will be asking them about this range of information, but I would want to go in knowing a little more. Though the fact they both have APA accreditation for their clinical psychology programs is a good sign, everything else concerns me.

    Like, I am hoping that I do well in my GRE, or if I bomb it, that perhaps I will not be so horrible in late September or October because it looks like institutions that have GRE requirements are more reputable? Like from what I can tell universities like Azusa Pacific or Fuller are a little more reputable overall. I hope to stay in California because my family has been suffering some setbacks and I need to be available, but I need to do what I need to do.

    So...yeah. Urm, anyone got any info or advice?
     
  7. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    I would avoid these schools. If I were to get an application for internship or a job candidate, that application finds its way right into my circular filing bin.
     
  8. Temperance

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    APA accreditation should not be considered "a good sign" but the minimum standard for a clinical psychology program. To apply for APA-accredited predoctoral internships through the APPIC match, your program must have APA accreditation or be scheduled for an accreditation site visit. If you do not have an APA-accredited internship, then you essentially shoot yourself in the foot before you've even started.

    Reviews may be helpful to learn about culture or environment, but the critical information is in the "Student Admissions, Outcomes, and Other Data" spreadsheets that programs are required to post on their website. Look at the rate of placement in APA-accredited internships. The vast majority of programs place 100% of their students. There are some exceptions, especially with smaller cohorts (e.g., three out of four applicants matched, but the one unmatched applicant applied to too few sites or other reasons). However, with programs with larger cohort sizes like the ones you've listed, they need to be placing nearly all of their students. If you're going into clinical work, then look at the licensure percentage rate. California also posts rates of passing the EPPP for each program; look into that, as well.

    How will you be paying? The programs you've listed are incredibly expensive and offer very little funding. Taking John F. Kennedy University as an example, their first-year tuition is $33,978. Based on their outcomes data, the average time to graduation is five years. Extrapolating leads to the program costing $169,890 in tuition alone. If you take out $175,000 in loans with a 25-year repayment plan at 6.6% interest -- the rate for federal Direct Unsubsidized loans -- then you can expect to be paying back $1,193 per month. That monthly payment can lock you out of a comfortable living, especially if you want to stay in California where the cost of living is already high.

    Having said all of that, the norm for clinical psychology programs is to waive tuition and pay graduate students a stipend and to place them in APA-accredited internships, so it says a lot when a program can't do these things.
     

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