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Snickerdoodle1996

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Hi everyone!!

So I am shadowing a doctor for the first time in the emergency department. The doctor GAVE ME THE OPTION of scrubs or professional clothes (but nothing too fancy he said) he also said that a lab coat is optional. What should I go for? (Also I am a girl).
 

macbookproretina

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Hi everyone!!

So I am shadowing a doctor for the first time in the emergency department. The doctor GAVE ME THE OPTION of scrubs or professional clothes (but nothing too fancy he said) he also said that a lab coat is optional. What should I go for? (Also I am a girl).
Wear scrubs if you have them
 
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darkjedi

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You'll fit in fine with scrubs. A lab coat would just make you stick out like a sore thumb.
 
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Snickerdoodle1996

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Also, is it best to change into the scrubs when arriving? As opposed to wearing them on the way there and potientally getting them dirty.
 

aldol16

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I'd wear scrubs if he provides them. No telling what will come in through those doors. You won't want to have to destroy your good clothes because an HIV-positive patient coughed blood up onto them.
 

Snickerdoodle1996

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I have my own scrubs, they told me the dress code was either scrubs or professional clothing
I'd wear scrubs if he provides them. No telling what will come in through those doors. You won't want to have to destroy your good clothes because an HIV-positive patient coughed blood up onto them.
 

Snickerdoodle1996

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I see. Still scrubs since those presumably cost less than your professional attire.
Is it best to show up and introduce myself and then change? I am sorry for all the questions, I just want it to go really well.
 
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aldol16

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Is it best to show up and introduce myself and then change? I am sorry for all the questions, I just want it to go really well.
I think you're overthinking it. I think that for practical reasons, scrubs might be a better choice. But it's entirely up to you - you can't really go wrong since he told you that either choice was acceptable. Just choose one and go with it! :)
 

jhg1232

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100% scrubs. I work an an er and i would def say scrubs, don't go in a a dress shirt and tie or a lab coat.
 

dinomite00

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I wore professional attire the whole summer in the ED and never had an issue with them getting dirty or anything for what its worth
 

Tenk

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Scrubs. The only people who wear professional attire in the ED are surgeons and pulmonologists.
 

OchemOficionado

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I think if you wear professional attire you should wear a lab coat. If he/the hospital/the practice isn't offering to let you borrow a short white coat, you should just wear scrubs. It isn't a big deal. I can't imagine how hard it's going to be for you to make bigger decisions, lol.
 

redferrari

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Scrubs. If you're worried about standing out with a lab coat, multiply that by 100 for professional clothing.

Rule of thumb: in clinic, professional; in hospital setting (especially OR or ER), scrubs.

When pre-meds show up in professional attire to shadow in the ER in our hospital, we always say, "Well bless their little heart."
 

Saifa

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I wear a dumb polo or something every time I shadow and am happily provided with scrubs. It says "I care about being here but am not trying to stand out like a weirdo."

One time I sternly referred to a doctor as "sir" in the operating room. I still shudder every time I have to imagine myself saying that in front of everyone.
 

The Buff OP

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liquidsodium

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Scrubs.

1) Highly doubt the doc is going to think twice about you wearing them - it's shadowing, not an interview. The character and curiosity you present > your outfit. His suggestion of professional vs scrubs is for the patients' benefit, not his own.

2) You'll avoid the neuroticism I suspect you'd have with picking professional attire.

3) Patients will more likely view you as part of the care team and worry less about what the hell that girl in khakis(?) is doing in the corner of their room.

4) Showing up in professional dress and changing into scrubs you brought with you seems like trying too hard. Show up prepared.


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Slack3r

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Scrub top, khanki pants. Bonus points if the scrub top is embroidered.
 

partypantss

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Wear scrubs. If you're worried about first impressions, showing up in scrubs gives the impression of "I'm here to learn and ain't messing around." If you are REALLY obsessed with showing the Dr. how professional and great you can look, then show up in professional, meet him and then excuse yourself to go change into scrubs in the hospital locker room. But honestly it's probably easier to just show up in scrubs.
 

mistafab

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Just show up in scrubs and start shadowing.

This thread took a strange, sociopathic turn with the whole "should I dress to kill, greet, then change?" Sad to hear there is so much pressure on premeds to perform with excellence in even the most mundane tasks.
 
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partypantss

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Just show up in scrubs and start shadowing.

This thread took a strange, sociopathic turn with the whole "should I dress to kill, greet, then change?" Sad to hear there is so much pressure on premeds to perform with excellence in even the most mundane tasks.
I think it's just good-old Neurotic Pre-med overthinking.
 

Dorr185

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I'd wear scrubs if he provides them. No telling what will come in through those doors. You won't want to have to destroy your good clothes because an HIV-positive patient coughed blood up onto them.
If the patient were HIV-negative would you keep the blood stained clothes?
 

aldol16

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If the patient were HIV-negative would you keep the blood stained clothes?
I would carefully dissolve the blood in distilled water, centrifuge it, separate out the plasma, and sell it.
 

mistafab

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I'd wear scrubs if he provides them. No telling what will come in through those doors. You won't want to have to destroy your good clothes because an HIV-positive patient coughed blood up onto them.
I didn't see this before. Please look up the facts about HIV before you post something like this - it just adds to stigma against those with HIV infection.

Blood can transmit HIV, true, but you do not have to destroy your clothes. the only way you would contract HIV in this scenario is if you have open wounds that you rub the soiled clothing onto or if you take the soiled clothing and stick it inside your nether regions.
 

DrYoda

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scrubs are fine. If you wear something other than those wear something looking at least remotely professional. Meaning I don't expect a dress shirt and tie per se but maybe khakis and a polo shirt at minimum.
 

aldol16

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I didn't see this before. Please look up the facts about HIV before you post something like this - it just adds to stigma against those with HIV infection.

Blood can transmit HIV, true, but you do not have to destroy your clothes. the only way you would contract HIV in this scenario is if you have open wounds that you rub the soiled clothing onto or if you take the soiled clothing and stick it inside your nether regions.
Or mucous membranes. Your pee pee isn't the only mucous membrane in your body. It also depends on viral load. But overall, HIV is much harder to transmit than most people think because the virus isn't particularly long-surviving. The comment was hyperbole.
 

mistafab

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I reassert that hyperbole at the expense of people living with HIV is unnecessary.


Edit: Please feel free to PM me if you have any questions or want to talk about it.
Or mucous membranes. Your pee pee isn't the only mucous membrane in your body. It also depends on viral load. But overall, HIV is much harder to transmit than most people think because the virus isn't particularly long-surviving. The comment was hyperbole.
 
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aldol16

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I reassert that hyperbole at the expense of people living with HIV is unnecessary.
You are certainly entitled to your opinion. I don't pretend to be politically correct nor will I be. However, I do not intend to make fun of people with HIV. I think it is a very serious disease and should be considered as such. But I also don't believe in tip-toeing around genuine concerns and reality. HIV no longer is a death sentence today like it was thirty years ago, but that doesn't mean one shouldn't be cautious about it. Being cavalier about something dangerous is how you get killed. Forgive me - I was a graduate student in chemistry. Excess of caution is better than lack of it.
 
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ChrisMack390

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The doctor isn't going to remember your name a week after this, much less the clothes you had on.
 

mistafab

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You used hyperbole at the expense of people living with HIV. You defended yourself by stating a loose assortment of facts so as to give yourself the image of an expert. You later stated that you have no intention of making hyperbole at the expense of PLWHIV. You then stated that being a graduant student in chemistry makes your statments hold weight.

Well buddy, there you go. Glad you got that out your system.

You are certainly entitled to your opinion. I don't pretend to be politically correct nor will I be. However, I do not intend to make fun of people with HIV. I think it is a very serious disease and should be considered as such. But I also don't believe in tip-toeing around genuine concerns and reality. HIV no longer is a death sentence today like it was thirty years ago, but that doesn't mean one shouldn't be cautious about it. Being cavalier about something dangerous is how you get killed. Forgive me - I was a graduate student in chemistry. Excess of caution is better than lack of it.
 

aldol16

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You used hyperbole at the expense of people living with HIV. You defended yourself by stating a loose assortment of facts so as to give yourself the image of an expert. You later stated that you have no intention of making hyperbole at the expense of PLWHIV. You then stated that being a graduant student in chemistry makes your statments hold weight.
You seem like you're having trouble interpreting my statements. Let me help you there. I am no expert on HIV. I don't pretend to be. I know enough about HIV and prevention as the next reasonably educated person in line. I don't intend to make fun of people living with HIV. My hyperboles will contain what they will - I'm not going to be politically correct about it. I simply do not feel like I'm making fun of those people. I'm simply being cautious. Being a graduate student doesn't make my statements hold any weight. But it does explain why I always act with an excess of caution. Take that all together and you might be able to understand why I would act with an abundance of caution in this case. You're the one who wants to take one phrase and blow it up out of proportion. I'm not walking around picking fights - you are.

You can read into my statements all you want, "buddy."
 
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