Jul 12, 2009
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Hello everyone! I was thinking that it would be a good Idea to kick up a new UNECOM thread for this year's applicants.

I just finished my secondary a few weeks ago - there was a little bit of a mix up on the UNECOM end with the essay questions. This year, UNECOM changed their supplemental questions to be more "big picture." those of you who got early secondaries may have noticed that the questions on the PDF were different from those on the actual application. the questions on the PDF are the new ones that they want you to answer. I beleive that the descrepancy has since been fixed, so people just now filling out their app should be fine. If you filled out the wrong questions you should send the new essays to [email protected].
 

droogdoc

It's "bleeping" golden...
Jul 12, 2009
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I just finished my secondary today. It was more questions than most secondaries but I found that the responses I gave were some of my best essays I have done. I actually liked the application for UNE-COM. Good luck to everyone else who submitted secondaries.
 

jbru3423

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I am applying to UNECOM this year and am awaiting AACOMAS verification...

UNECOM is one of my top choices...

Hope my statistics are competitive...

Best of luck to all applying this year...
 

jkmph

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I'm a Maine native and applying to UNECOM with LORs from 2 alumni. My biggest turnoff is the tuition. It's absolutely absurd. One of the DOs I talked to graduated in 2000 and paid 28k his senior year. Now it's north of 46k. How does everyone else plan to approach this?
 

droogdoc

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$46,000 is pretty bad. That is probably the highest I've seen, except if you go to MSU-COM as an out-of-stater! Not going to stop me though as UNECOM is high on my list of school choices. There's always a way.
 

jkmph

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Right because 43k plus auxiliary costs not including living expenses isn't going to add to 46k. You've obviously missed my point on a technicality.

More importantly, UNECOM graduates have the highest average debt load of any medical school in the country at 200k at graduation. It's like 12k above the next closest if my memory serves me correctly.

It's my first choice, I'm just trying to provoke dialogue...
 

BoSox248

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I didn't miss your point at all. So, you really don't need to be rude about it.

I was merely telling people on this thread, who are applying to UNECOM, what the tuition (and fees) are and leading them to a page with common FAQs. No need to get defensive.

And yes, according to US News, UNECOM does produce students with the most debt in the country. Sadly, I wish I was looking at only graduating with 200K in loans. The truth is, most of us will graduate with A LOT more loans than that.

I also do not know how much I believe in those stats anyway seeing as we are definately not the most expensive medical school in the country and we definately do not have the highest cost of living.

Trust me though, medical school is not cheap, and UNECOM is absolutely no exception.
 
1

123165

The number to pay by credit card on the supplemental instruction page is incorrect. I am not sure why, but the people at that number referred me to

207-231-4219 --- Kathy

She took my name, address, CC#. DId not even ask for AACOMAS or SSN
 

ShyRem

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UNE, unlike other institutions, does not have an endowment that provides significant scholarship or grant money. Thus, while MSU has a huge OOS tuition bill they often will give scholarship/grant money to OOS folks to bring their tuition down to IS status (so I hear), UNE doesn't do anything for their students in terms of lowering tuition. Most students tend to borrow the max in loans.

Also, you should all be aware that UNE will raise the COM tuition at least 6% every year whether they need it or not. They will also send you a nice letter every year bragging how they kept the increase below double digits. It is the feeling of many students that the COM is funding the marine biology program and most of the building going on around campus. This rumor is fueled by the fact that ALL tuition monies collected by UNE (whether COM, undergrad, pharmD, etc) all go into the general fund. So there is absolutely no way to know whether COM funds stay in COM. And the administration won't tell you how much they collect from COM and how much COM costs are. Also, UNE pays the least of any school for rotations in your 3rd and 4th year. Tufts, UVM, Dartmouth, etc. all pay more to the rotation sites per student than UNE does.

I'm not saying UNE is a bad school. But you should all be aware of the cost of the school you choose to attend, what their policies are, and where your money goes. Especially given the very real possibility of health care reform and the fact that you will be expected to start repayment of your loans while in residency. (That little fun bit is new this year and is not expected to change.)
 

droogdoc

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Jul 12, 2009
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does anyone know if UNE has a lot of HPSP millitary students? it would make sence given the tuition.
Wouldn't surprise me. HPSP is becoming more popular, given tuition rates. I think most schools have a good number of them. I talked to an Air Force HPSP rep. recently and he told me he is EXTREMELY busy right now. So if you are thinking of doing it, start the process now so you can get in on the first board in January. It isn't as far off as you think, it's a lengthy process.
 

ShyRem

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I don't know what your definition of "a lot" is. We have a fair number in my class.

BTW: our class first-time Step 1 board pass rates just came out. 96%. 3rd in the country. Be interesting to see how class of 2011 does.
 

jkmph

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I don't know what your definition of "a lot" is. We have a fair number in my class.

BTW: our class first-time Step 1 board pass rates just came out. 96%. 3rd in the country. Be interesting to see how class of 2011 does.
3rd for all medical schools, or DO schools? Just wondering.
 
1

123165

3rd for all medical schools, or DO schools? Just wondering.
Step 1 is not the same for DO and MD. As I understand it though, some DO's take the MD step 1.


Someone please tell me if I am mistaken, I don't want to give bad info.
 

ShyRem

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The only score our school tracks is the COMLEX. Some students take the USMLE, that is not required nor tracked.

You take step 1 after your second year, step 2 after your third year, step 3 after your intern year (first year of residency). There is talk of this changing to a two step exam for the USMLE, not sure what COMLEX is talking about doing.
 

jkmph

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Step 1 is not the same for DO and MD. As I understand it though, some DO's take the MD step 1.
Yeah I understand that. Whether someone at a DO school takes COMLEX or an MD school takes USMLE, the pass rates are still calculated as simple ratios and can thus be compared. My question was whether the pass rate of 96% was relevant only to DO schools or to all medical schools.

I suppose, in a circumlocutive fashion, my question was answered.
 
1

123165

Yeah I understand that. Whether someone at a DO school takes COMLEX or an MD school takes USMLE, the pass rates are still calculated as simple ratios and can thus be compared. My question was whether the pass rate of 96% was relevant only to DO schools or to all medical schools.

I suppose, in a circumlocutive fashion, my question was answered.
I do see your point, and I am not sure how to get an answer to it. My guess is the pass rate would only be compared to other DO schools. Although, 96% i pretty dang high, and very well could be allopathic schools as well
 
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elftown

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i hope i get accepted :)

the pictures are so beautiful and peace of mind is at the top of my list.
 

jkmph

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Agree Elftown & Kevon, this is my first choice. Maine is my native state and I have a strong affinity/incentive to stay.

The tuition concerns me greatly I find myself struggling to consider alternative means of financing medical school without joining the military. I will have ~100k in debt by next summer from my undergrad/MPH and thus would find myself in the 300-400k range if I were to borrow money to finance my medical education. That is a staggering number regardless of specialty. However considering the statistical likelihood of pursuing primary care, whether my first choice or not, this number becomes more daunting.

If and when I interview there, this will be my first question for anyone willing to listen.
 

droogdoc

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Jul 12, 2009
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Agree Elftown & Kevon, this is my first choice. Maine is my native state and I have a strong affinity/incentive to stay.

The tuition concerns me greatly I find myself struggling to consider alternative means of financing medical school without joining the military. I will have ~100k in debt by next summer from my undergrad/MPH and thus would find myself in the 300-400k range if I were to borrow money to finance my medical education. That is a staggering number regardless of specialty. However considering the statistical likelihood of pursuing primary care, whether my first choice or not, this number becomes more daunting.

If and when I interview there, this will be my first question for anyone willing to listen.
UNECOM is a great school but the tuition is a problem, as it is for all med schools. A friend of mine is going to Rush Medical College here in Chicago and she told me the other day she calculated that after school if she made the minimum required payments to her loans it would come out to $850,000 by the time it was payed off over the years.

I couldn't believe it, until she walked me through it.

Oh, and if anyone is actually considering doing HPSP, as a former service member, yes you should think long and hard about it but honestly, physicians in the military are almost civilians. People don't bug them and they don't deal with a lot of garbage like other officers. Just remember, if you do HPSP in the Navy you will be forced to do 1-3 years of General Medical Officer duty BEFORE you start residency and that still doesn't coutn towards the time you owe on the scholarship.
 

ShyRem

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UNECOM is currently looking for a new Dean. The first interview/Q&A with students was yesterday, and you can bet that student debt load was one of the first questions we asked. And we'll ask every candidate about how they plan on controlling the student debt load at UNE. So far the one answer received has been... disappointing. But then again, I have to remember they are candidates and don't quite know what they're walking into.
 
Jul 28, 2009
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Would you mind posting what the secondary questions are? I would like to work on them and I am still waiting for my application to be verified! Thanks!! :)
 
Jul 24, 2009
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Hey folks,

This is a fantastic website

Anybody know average stats for UNE. They don't post a minimum GPA or if there is a cut off for applications.

I would love to know 25th, 50th, 75th percentile stats...can't seem to find them anywhere.

Also, it appears that the majority of students are from new england (my understanding is 60% of the class. I wonder how many applications they get from new england students.

Love to find out this data.
 
Jul 24, 2009
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Agree Elftown & Kevon, this is my first choice. Maine is my native state and I have a strong affinity/incentive to stay.

The tuition concerns me greatly I find myself struggling to consider alternative means of financing medical school without joining the military. I will have ~100k in debt by next summer from my undergrad/MPH and thus would find myself in the 300-400k range if I were to borrow money to finance my medical education. That is a staggering number regardless of specialty. However considering the statistical likelihood of pursuing primary care, whether my first choice or not, this number becomes more daunting.

If and when I interview there, this will be my first question for anyone willing to listen.
Nice to see another mainer on this site. Best of luck in recieving an interview.
 

ShyRem

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Average stats for UNE have been previously reported ... for my class it was MCAT 27, don't recall what the GPA was. somewhere around 3.5?? but those are averages. I know someone who got in with a sub-20 MCAT and several with sub-3.0 GPAs. I know the average stats for matriculating students have been climbing.

UNE doesn't release their percentile averages.

UNE used to have a minimum MCAT, but obviously they've overlooked that before.

They receive the majority of their applications from new england students. They don't give out the exact percentages, but they say "majority".

If you want to find out the data, call the application office and see if they'll give it to you. But I doubt they will, just because they probably don't track it all. Several of the stats you would "love to get" aren't tracked or given out by any school that I know of.
 
May 25, 2009
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Hello!

I am visiting UNECOM tomorrow and if you guys have specific questions I can ask or things to check out let me know on the forum. Sorry for short notice guys.

Vincent
 

teacherman84

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Oh, and if anyone is actually considering doing HPSP, as a former service member, yes you should think long and hard about it but honestly, physicians in the military are almost civilians. People don't bug them and they don't deal with a lot of garbage like other officers. Just remember, if you do HPSP in the Navy you will be forced to do 1-3 years of General Medical Officer duty BEFORE you start residency and that still doesn't coutn towards the time you owe on the scholarship.
Not true on many counts...
Physicians in the military are not like civilians at all...they are officers. They deploy for 6-12 months like everyone else, they wear camo like everyone else, they are PCSed (moved from base to base with little say where you move to) every few years, they deal with all the same garbage like other officers and if you ask some they deal with more. Regardless of you job in the military, you are in the military, the government owns you.
But if you do Navy HPSP you wont necessarily have to do 1-3 years as a GMO. If you decide to do a competitive specialty (ortho, rads, gas, etc.) you will have to, but as I have been told, most who choose to pursue less competitive specialties like FM, IM, of GS then you might be able to go right into residency after internship. If you are interested in this program spend some time on the military medicine thread.

Ayway...as for UNE
I was raised in Maine and graduated from UMO but have spent the past 4 years in FL. I am ready to move somewhere a bit cooler. Do they give any preference to people from maine or with strong ties?
 

droogdoc

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Jul 12, 2009
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Not true on many counts...
Physicians in the military are not like civilians at all...they are officers. They deploy for 6-12 months like everyone else, they wear camo like everyone else, they are PCSed (moved from base to base with little say where you move to) every few years, they deal with all the same garbage like other officers and if you ask some they deal with more. Regardless of you job in the military, you are in the military, the government owns you.
But if you do Navy HPSP you wont necessarily have to do 1-3 years as a GMO. If you decide to do a competitive specialty (ortho, rads, gas, etc.) you will have to, but as I have been told, most who choose to pursue less competitive specialties like FM, IM, of GS then you might be able to go right into residency after internship. If you are interested in this program spend some time on the military medicine thread.

Ayway...as for UNE
I was raised in Maine and graduated from UMO but have spent the past 4 years in FL. I am ready to move somewhere a bit cooler. Do they give any preference to people from maine or with strong ties?
If you say so. I was a medic in the Army for 4 years, got out last year, and sorry, doctors in the military lead the best lifestyle out of enlisted or officer personnel, CASE CLOSED.

I don't need to read a military medicine thread.

They DO NOT have to do nearly the amount of bureacracy-fulfilling tasks of other officers, they get the best pay, and many times, the higher-ups leave them alone unless they are a doc in a command position. they don't go to meetings,etc except the same kind that civilian docs do. The poor medical service officers bear the brunt of that stuff, especially on deployments. Of course they are officers first, of course they deploy you missed my point. Their lifestyle in the military is as close to a civilian you can get while still actually being a service member. You are wrong...on many counts.
And YES, Navy is BIG on GMO. THis comes from a navy Lieutenant I worked with occasionally while I worked in a trauma facility for 6 months in Ramadi, when I wasnt on missions. GMO can be bypassed, but not easy. That was from him. He was currently GMO and was starting an ER residency the next year. Like I said, he said most Navy docs do GMO at least 1 year.
 

ShyRem

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UNE is a private university. They have no obligation to take NE folks over others, but they do serve the NE area just by their geographic location. However, I had no ties to Maine and was accepted. There were 4 people from Colorado in my class, and there are many other areas represented. Apply if you want to. The fact you don't live in NE won't hurt you.
 

J-Rad

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If you say so. I was a medic in the Army for 4 years, got out last year, and sorry, doctors in the military lead the best lifestyle out of enlisted or officer personnel, CASE CLOSED.

I don't need to read a military medicine thread.

They DO NOT have to do nearly the amount of bureacracy-fulfilling tasks of other officers, they get the best pay, and many times, the higher-ups leave them alone unless they are a doc in a command position. they don't go to meetings,etc except the same kind that civilian docs do. The poor medical service officers bear the brunt of that stuff, especially on deployments. Of course they are officers first, of course they deploy you missed my point. Their lifestyle in the military is as close to a civilian you can get while still actually being a service member. You are wrong...on many counts.
...
As are you. You're experience as a medic has almost no relevance to your ability to assess what the professional life of military physicians is like. While the life of a milmed doc is different than line officers, it is no less tied up in beurocracy and in some cases is even moreso. The general rep of all the services is that this is the case in USAF>>USN>USA. My experience working within the confines of the first two bears that out. While the military forums tend to be overly negative, they're a worthwhile read. Even the "pro" posters will aknowledge this fact (the beurocracy). So be careful of commenting on what you have an inadequate frame of reference for with an authoratative voice.

And back to the UNE theme: I'm glad to hear board scores were good this year. I'll be interested to see what the Dean candidates come up with for the tuition issue.
 

droogdoc

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As are you. You're experience as a medic has almost no relevance to your ability to assess what the professional life of military physicians is like. While the life of a milmed doc is different than line officers, it is no less tied up in beurocracy and in some cases is even moreso. The general rep of all the services is that this is the case in USAF>>USN>USA. My experience working within the confines of the first two bears that out. While the military forums tend to be overly negative, they're a worthwhile read. Even the "pro" posters will aknowledge this fact (the beurocracy). So be careful of commenting on what you have an inadequate frame of reference for with an authoratative voice.

And back to the UNE theme: I'm glad to hear board scores were good this year. I'll be interested to see what the Dean candidates come up with for the tuition issue.
Then the military docs lied. Also, please dont assume you know how invloved I was with my job when it came to docs in the military. I dont think my job consisted solely of what you may think. Also, I don't mind admitting wit but when I was station ed the US after my first deployment I was, well, VERY "involved" with one doc and I would say got a pretty good idea of what her job was like.

Also, especially J-Rad, I am not trying to disrespect you or anything and don't mean to be rude. The main reason I made the post I did is becuase I was looking at it differently, as a person that saw the difference between physicians and regular line officers, especially on deployment. Yes, THEY DID NOT deal with some of the crap line officers did but of course had their own crap to deal with, so do civilian physicians, it cant be escaped.

I blame myself. I think what I was trying to say didnt come across properly, which is usually the case when not in person. No hard feelings I hope. Sorry for getting off UNE topic!!
 
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jkmph

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I blame myself. I think what I was trying to say didnt come across properly, which is usually the case when not in person. No hard feelings I hope. Sorry for getting off UNE topic!!
Are you suggesting tone and intent can be misinterpreted on the interwebz? Impossible! :laugh:
 
Jul 24, 2009
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Average stats for UNE have been previously reported ... for my class it was MCAT 27, don't recall what the GPA was. somewhere around 3.5?? but those are averages. I know someone who got in with a sub-20 MCAT and several with sub-3.0 GPAs. I know the average stats for matriculating students have been climbing.

UNE doesn't release their percentile averages.

UNE used to have a minimum MCAT, but obviously they've overlooked that before.

They receive the majority of their applications from new england students. They don't give out the exact percentages, but they say "majority".

If you want to find out the data, call the application office and see if they'll give it to you. But I doubt they will, just because they probably don't track it all. Several of the stats you would "love to get" aren't tracked or given out by any school that I know of.
Thanks for the information. I've seen some of their averages in past years, just not the different percentiles or cut off stats. On their website, they mention the average of the most recent class, but as you know an average can be misleading without additional data.

It's also my understanding that they do indeed give preference to new england students....it's addressed in their UNECOM mission statement if I remember correctly.

Any thoughts whats more competitive to get into...their med school or their PA school?

Thanks for the insight, ATCPT1
 

ShyRem

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Directly from their website:
MISSION
The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine transforms students into health care leaders who advance patient-centered, high quality osteopathic primary care and community health for the people of New England and the nation.
Says nothing about preference for NE residents.

Now on the criteria page, it says:

The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine application process examines the whole person, just as an osteopathic physician works with and treats the whole person. There are many different criteria the Committee on Admissions uses to evaluate applicants, including:
Academic record and scholastic ability
Exposure to and experience in health care and human services
Leadership, community service and/or research experience
Interest in practicing primary care, practicing in New England and/or working in underserved communities
The maturity and desire to work collaboratively with classmates, faculty, health care providers and patients.
So it looks like if you are interested in practicing in NE area or working in underserved communities or primary care that can be a bonus. By no means does that mean if you don't fall into those criteria are you a "goner". Most students change their minds regarding their chosen specialty during their medical school years, and many many students leave NE for residency positions.

As for whether it's harder to get into the PA school: I have no idea what the admissions criteria are for PA school, nor what their averages are for matriculants. Percentage-wise, they get proportionately as many applications per seat as does the COM. That's literally all I know about the PA school.
 

teacherman84

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If you say so. I was a medic in the Army for 4 years, got out last year, and sorry, doctors in the military lead the best lifestyle out of enlisted or officer personnel, CASE CLOSED.
maybe from where you were stationed as a medic working with docs...I know plenty of enlisted that see the officers they work with and around as living the best lifestyle. In some instances that may be the case but I was trying to correct the picture of milimed you were painting so broadly...

I don't need to read a military medicine thread.
I disagree...though this was directed to those you were encouraging to jump right in because its a great deal.

They DO NOT have to do nearly the amount of bureacracy-fulfilling tasks of other officers, they get the best pay, and many times, the higher-ups leave them alone unless they are a doc in a command position. they don't go to meetings,etc except the same kind that civilian docs do. The poor medical service officers bear the brunt of that stuff, especially on deployments. Of course they are officers first, of course they deploy you missed my point. Their lifestyle in the military is as close to a civilian you can get while still actually being a service member. While I respectfully disagree with that statement, I was trying to point out the fact that it is nothing like civilian practice...it may be closer than someone loading missles on a jet in Iraq, but it still comes nowhere close to civilian life. You are wrong...on many counts. I dont see anything I posted to be misleading or false. I still stand by it all 100%.
And YES, Navy is BIG on GMO. THis comes from a navy Lieutenant I worked with occasionally while I worked in a trauma facility for 6 months in Ramadi, when I wasnt on missions. GMO can be bypassed, but not easy. That was from him. He was currently GMO and was starting an ER residency the next year. EM is one of the more desireable residencies, civilian and military...thus his situation would actually reinforce my claim. Like I said, he said most Navy docs do GMO at least 1 year . Like I said...the desirable slots definitely do...but the residencies that dont fill do not have to do a GMO
Don't get defensive...I wasnt attacking your claims, I just felt you werent telling the whole story. You're experience in the Navy may have been one way but there are multiple branches and multiple specialties...dont apply your singular experience to the entire system.
 

droogdoc

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Don't get defensive...I wasnt attacking your claims, I just felt you werent telling the whole story. You're experience in the Navy may have been one way but there are multiple branches and multiple specialties...dont apply your singular experience to the entire system.
I never said it was a great thing and to just jump right in. You are reading WAAAYYY beyond what I was writing and was just telling my opinion of doctors in the service, from my own experience and especially practically living with one everyday Also, I never said I was in the Navy. Army.

Since this is a UNECOM thread this topic should be dropped, and I didnt mean to be getting defensive. Sorry if my stuff came across like that. Please PM me if anyone has any other comments since this isnt the right thread to do it.
 
Jul 24, 2009
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Directly from their website:


Says nothing about preference for NE residents.
http://www.une.edu/com/admissions/faq.asp

1. Can you describe a typical UNE College of Osteopathic Medicine student?
  • The average age of a first-year student is 27 years old.
  • There is generally a 50/50 split between men and women, but all four of the current classes have more women than men.
  • Nearly 10 percent of the class identify themselves as non-white.
  • Not all students have undergraduate degrees in the sciences, but most have some type of professional health care or human services experience before applying.
  • More and more students are applying after completing a master's degree.
  • Students come from around the country and the world, but the majority are from New England (approximately 60-70 percent) and the northeast states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York (up to 20 percent).

2. Do you accept students from outside of New England?
As an independent private institution, the UNE College of Osteopathic Medicine accepts students from around the United State and the world. In keeping with the mission of the institution, generally 60 percent of the accepted class is from New England. There are also many students from California, Colorado, Florida, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York.
 

jkmph

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Direct from their admissions office, being a Maine resident improves the probability of receiving a seat at the school. Is the NE preference really something worth arguing about?
 

ShyRem

I need more coffee.
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Jun 17, 2004
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It's amazing how much misinformation folks believe.

People are so afraid to apply believing they have no chance since they're not from NE. Proportionately, you probably have a better chance being accepted being from a non-NE state if only 60% of the class is from NE. I'm not sure 40% of the applications are from non-NE residents.
 
Jul 24, 2009
61
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Resident [Any Field]
It's amazing how much misinformation folks believe.

People are so afraid to apply believing they have no chance since they're not from NE. Proportionately, you probably have a better chance being accepted being from a non-NE state if only 60% of the class is from NE. I'm not sure 40% of the applications are from non-NE residents.
Thanks ShyRem for your insight regarding new england students. I understand what you're saying....non NE residents shouldn't shy away from applying b/c they do indeed admit folks from around the nation.

I also called and finnally somebody returned my phone call. I was also told that they give preference to qualified NE students. I asked some specific questions.....Do you overlook qualified non NE students to admit qualified NE students...answer was yes. Decisions are predicated on the mission statement.....students from new england are much more likely to practice in new england....thus the preference.

But also went on to the typical retoric of how they still have student representation from around the nation.....and there are spots for highly qualified candidates.


Unedited, atcpt1
 
Jul 24, 2009
61
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Hello,

I am a Maine native as well. I hesitated to accept at UNECOM with 70K in loans for the first year. But, I found out about the public service loan forgiveness program for anyone with Stafford and/or Grad PLUS loans, and I realized it is totally do-able, and so I am in! So just don't worry about it if you are interested in working for 10 years for the government and/or a non profit.

Good luck!
Can you explain more about this program....
I suppose I could google it, but if you have details...feel free.
Do a lot of med students take advantage of loan forgiveness programs?
 

JanikeyDoc

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UNECOM is a great school but the tuition is a problem, as it is for all med schools. A friend of mine is going to Rush Medical College here in Chicago and she told me the other day she calculated that after school if she made the minimum required payments to her loans it would come out to $850,000 by the time it was payed off over the years.

I couldn't believe it, until she walked me through it.

Oh, and if anyone is actually considering doing HPSP, as a former service member, yes you should think long and hard about it but honestly, physicians in the military are almost civilians. People don't bug them and they don't deal with a lot of garbage like other officers. Just remember, if you do HPSP in the Navy you will be forced to do 1-3 years of General Medical Officer duty BEFORE you start residency and that still doesn't coutn towards the time you owe on the scholarship.
That is because of accrued interest, even if you take out $250K with interest it will wind up costing a lot more. This is a way for the loan companies to make money, that is why they are eager to loan students this kind of money, and they know doctors and other professionals will have the earning capacity to pay these loans.
 
Jul 28, 2009
9
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Hiii. I know I already asked this once, but thought I would try again! If anyone knows the UNECOM secondary questions, would you mind posting them? My app should be verified soon, but I would like to start working on the secondary essays, if possible. Thanks!
 

blah354

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Apr 16, 2008
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Hiii. I know I already asked this once, but thought I would try again! If anyone knows the UNECOM secondary questions, would you mind posting them? My app should be verified soon, but I would like to start working on the secondary essays, if possible. Thanks!
This was last year's. Does anyone know if we still need to list ALL of the schools we're applying to in this year's secondary? Thank youuuu.

UNECOM

List ALL the medical schools (osteopathic and allopathic) to which you have applied in the past and/or are applying to this admissions cycle. List each school/college on separate line and include month/year of application.

Describe your particular interest in attending UNECOM and what brought you to your decision to apply. Reflect on the type of physician you want to become, and how UNECOM can help you reach your potential.

Describe any contact you have had with UNECOM students, alumni, faculty members, or clinicians, admissions/student affairs staff members, etc. How did these interactions influence your decision to apply?

Reflect on your involvement in healthcare, research, clubs, and community organizations. In light of all these experiences, how would you evaluate the strengths and weaknesses in your preparation to study and practice osteopathic medicine?

Please share any additions or changes since submitting your AACOMAS application. Include academic recognition, research achievements and/or publications, presentations, promotions or changes in employment, recent leadership or volunteer service, etc.
 
1

123165

Just double checking a couple things.

How did you know you were complete here, was there an e-mail, or letter? In my records I checked myself as complete, but cannot find the e-mail that stated this.

Next, the website states official transcripts are needed. Is this reinforcing the AACOMAS need, or do transcripts need to be sent directly to UNECOM?
 

teacherman84

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Jun 27, 2008
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I got a complete email the day after i submitted my secondary. It read as follows...

We are pleased to have received your supplemental application to the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNECOM), as well as all required letters of recommendation. Your application file is complete. Thank you for your interest thus far.

Generally, applications are reviewed for possible interview in the order they are completed. In some cases, applications may be placed on hold and reconsidered later in the admissions cycle. For your information, we anticipate interviewing through early April 2010. We will notify you once a decision has been made on the outcome of your application review.

If you have not already done so, we also invite you to learn more about UNECOM through our website at www.une.edu/com/admissions. You can gain a better understanding of our application process; meet outstanding students, faculty and alumni through leadership profiles; and explore our on-line master in public health degree and the latest updates in our biomedical research efforts. You can also request, through the UNECOM Office of Recruitment, Student and Alumni Services (RSAS), to be contacted by a current student and/or schedule a campus visit.

If you have any questions regarding your application, please do not hesitate to contact me.