Oct 27, 2010
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I was just curious what you guys considered to be your biggest challenge when it came to you schooling? Was it a specific class/teacher? Balancing your school/work/personal life? Was it the application process? Was it motivation or focus issue? How did you get past this challenge?

I ask this because I'm finding my current challenge is that I myself of course. I'm not moving through classes as easily as I thought I would and it seems that I am not learning as quickly as maybe some of the other students are.
 

bbeventer

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My current challenge honestly is staying motivated and keeping my 'eye on the prize'. I keep getting distracted with the easy options like dropping out and joining the military, or thinking about going and being a working student out in Virgina, or just taking time off from school.

What if feels like for me is when I played basketball and we had to run a million suicides. The only way to get through it was to put your head down and go to a happy place mentally.

Thankfully I have my horse down here at school so I am able to go to a happy place everyday both mentally and physically and that has been my biggest cooping mechanism, however, it is starting to become a huge temptation.... Virgina.... lol.
 

HopefulAg

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My biggest challenge was motivation. I can never get motivated to study and still struggle to do so (for instance, I should be studying cranial nerves right now instead of posting this) but I think I'm getting betterish: a unit measured in micro-fragments.
 

alliecat44

KSU CVM Class of '11
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Depression secondary to major family issues starting my senior year in high school. Ugh. We lost our house and became technically homeless (each person living with a separate relative) in October of my senior year, just in time for college applications. Declared bankruptcy, the whole bit. Was severely depressed and ended up failing AP calculus (!!) and not caring/not paying attention in pretty much any class but AP chem (5 on the exam). I only got in to my one safety school which was my last choice for various reasons and I had a chip on my shoulder because of it. Depression/bitterness continued on to first year of college where I failed second semester of o-chem and got a D in calc. Awful. Should've seen a therapist for all this crap when I had the chance. Ended up graduating with a 3.1 cumulative and had a hard time getting vet schools to even look at me (no "explanation statement" on the VMCAS back then), let alone interview me.

My advice: something really crappy happens, don't wait--get help.Don't let depression keep you from seeking a therapist. Can have lasting effects on your academic performance and career goals for years!! (Took four cycles over seven years to get in.)

On the plus side--academic stuff in vet school really doesn't phase me or stress me out. (I do, however, get inordinately frustrated with administrative stuff, though! ;) )
 

CurrySpice

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I tend to be a quiet person, and I have had trouble connecting with veterinarians that I've been shadowing. I LOVE the practice that I shadowed at last spring (and will next spring) as well as my experiences on the vida trip... but I tend to find most veterinary offices nerve-wracking. It makes it hard to gain experience when you panic about going to a new place.

The classes don't faze me, and I'm done the vast majority of my prereqs. I imagine that I will have difficulty with the interview, but I am confident it will all work out.
 

pennyonthefloor

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My biggest challenge has been recovering from a very violent home invasion during my sophomore year of undergrad. The psychological impact has taken its toll on me and I know there is a great deal of PTSD that I'm trying to work through. It's been four years and I know things have gotten immensely better, but there are still days where I find myself on edge and I cannot explain it. I know it takes time and I have been utilizing all of the resources available to try to cope, but it's frustrating and is, at times, out of my control.
 

PendantWorld

Cornell CVM c/o 2015
Dec 1, 2010
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Greetings! I'm new to the forums and just thought I'd contribute to this thread. I've had a couple of challenges in vet school prep. I started out in an engineering major and didn't realize I wanted to be a veterinarian until my junior year. However, I stuck with my major b/c I didn't want admissions people to see me as a quitter. Finishing my capstone project and senior labs while balancing in all my remaining pre-req's was enormously straining. However, it also reinforced how far I'm willing to go to be a vet.

Also, it was super hard for me to work veterinary experience into my schedule. My application this year only has ~500 hrs and I'm worried that it just won't be enough.
 

sumstorm

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Dealing with life drama; family losses, illness, job loss, etc. and not letting it impact my 'work' of school. Being frustrated with all academia and not enough practical. I want to be in clinics NOW, not just fourth year. Frustrated by minutia (seriously, a disease that was prevalent in military dogs returning from vietnam, but not communicable in the US, just isn't that important to me) that seems irrelevant. Poor test taking abilities (I have sought help on this, but I am really affected by who writes the questions, but recently read an article by Malcom Gladwell that might be useful.)

I get through it by enjoying hobbies when I can, attending wetlabs, meeting with mentors. I keep my eye on why I am doing this.
 
OP
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Thank you all for your honesty! I actually talked to my boyfriend about my particular frustration yesterday day and his response was "one thing at a time". I'm 65 credit hours into a 120 credit hour degree and I'm only going part time so I have awhile before I should actually panic.
 

NStarz

Ohio State c/o 2016
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Good thread, interesting to hear everyone's back stories :)

My freshmen I came down with a then acute medical condition which has since turned chronic. Ended up hospitalized 3+ times 2nd semester freshman year, then 2X more over the summer, then 2X more over the next year's intersession. It was really tough for me. Became depressed, ended up at a therapist (nothing wrong with that!), and was having trouble seeing past it, especially when there were people living with my condition going on past 30 years (this is not something that should be lived with that long). Then I finally found a medication that was working and it ended up clouding my mental faculties. Which sucked. Went to a new doctor and things are finally under control, but I need to go back for treatment in NY every 3 months (which is going to get mighty expensive if I end up going to vet school in Washington state! haha).

I think part of my problem in deciding that I wanted to pursue vet med late is that my thoughts could not venture past the here and now. Once my health started to return to normal, I was able to really think about my future and decide my career field. I think I am a better person--stronger, less willing to be swayed by the desire to please people, tenacious, and very dedicated to my academics, closer to my family--because of it, though I don't wish it on the most hated person in the world.

My 3 year anniversary (how awful is it to put it like that??) is on March 15th.
 

Marsala

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The biggest challenge that I have faced is that I had to work 70 hours a week for 4 years while taking prereqs. I had used up my loan eligibility and had to pay for everything. I was working 3 different jobs that were absolutely draining. It sucked. But now that I'm in a grad program, things are much better. I just had to focus on the light at the end of the tunnel. I also tend to deal with difficulties by reminding myself that there are people who have it far worse than I.

I also have testing difficulties like sumstorm. Multiple-choice is my kryptonite. Sumstorm, can you post a link to the article that you are referring to?
 

Raimes

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Myself.

If you would like me to elaborate I will.
 

sumstorm

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I also have testing difficulties like sumstorm. Multiple-choice is my kryptonite. Sumstorm, can you post a link to the article that you are referring to?
LOL. multiple choice and T/F are my worst enemies. I'm great at essays and short answer. I'd have to see if I can find the Gladwell article, but it talked about stereotyping impacting performance. It talked about several studies, including one in mathematics that was given to women. When women were given the test (without being told their performance was evaluated via the test) they performed as well or better than men in the same room, but when they were told the test was an evaluation of their ability, they performed drasticly worse. Another study examined what happens when a person facing a stereotypy (but who is competent) takes an exam. The person slows down, tries harder, and does worse.

The point I gleaned from it was that when you have competent individual who isn't comfortable, they will try harder, which will actually cause poorer performance, reinforcing the 'try harder' advice, reinforcing the poor performance. His point (revealed by the studies) is that trying harder isn't helping, that moving faster, and not thinking so much is likely more applicable, with drilling on speed. That confidence needs to be built up, rather than focusing on trying harder. It isn't as easy to explain....and I plan on re-reading it.

It is also in his book 'what the dog saw' and there are certainly things he writes that I disagree with, but this gave me a different perspective. I always thought I just needed to 'buckle down, work harder, read more carefully.' Now I think that might be bad advice.
 

Raimes

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sumstorm, that study/book sounds extremely interesting, and does bring up some valid points! Have you put these theories into practice? And if so have they worked for you?
 

sumstorm

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sumstorm, that study/book sounds extremely interesting, and does bring up some valid points! Have you put these theories into practice? And if so have they worked for you?
Not yet. just found the article right before finals...so will spend winter break (1.5 wks till then) figuring it out, hoping to implement it next semester.
 

canis13

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Definitely my biggest challenge has been, and I anticipate will always be, my issues with focus and motivation. I was diagnosed with ADHD when I was 16, and the best way I can describe it is that sometimes I just have such incredible difficulty with getting my brain to turn on. I know from experience that when I put time and energy into my coursework and when I am able to focus on studying, I do well, and I learn the material very well and actually pretty quickly compared to the amount of time that some other people have to spend to learn the same stuff. I'm a great writer, and did exceptionally well in my courses that required writing (humanities and social science courses), but my writing could've been even better if I were able to finish papers sooner than an hour before the deadline. With science courses and tests, I can't get myself to keep up with the material, and as a result, I always always always cram. And this, in turn, means that I suffer from really bad test anxiety - I don't get anxious during tests, but in the day or two before any kind of exam, I usually turn into a stressed out wreck.

Anyway, that is what I am most nervous about with vet school - just being able to keep up with things. It honestly feels like right now that the only way I am able to learn material is if there's a huge deadline staring me in the face, and I know that I'm going to have to find some additional source of motivation in vet school in order to make myself study every day.

The other tough thing, I think, has been finding vet experiences. Sometimes I feel like I've had more bad luck with landing shadowing opportunities and jobs than anyone else I know. For my closest friend and my older siblings...they will send out one, maybe two emails, and boom, they have a summer job. For every job/experience/shadowing-gig I've had, there've been at least 10-20 other opportunities I've pursued that haven't worked out. It gets really draining, and hard to feel like not giving up. Like right now I'm trying to find any kind of public health internship for this January - anywhere in the country! Doesn't have to be paid! And I've sent out already close to 15 emails/phone calls and only have had one positive response from someone, which I'm not sure is actually going to work out. Sometimes I seriously think I'm cursed or something.
 

Armymutt25A

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Sorry to hijack...
seriously, a disease that was prevalent in military dogs returning from vietnam, but not communicable in the US,
Ok, so this fascinates me - what's the disease and what's the vector? Seems so odd. I spent a lot of time with "wild" dogs in Iraq.
LOL. multiple choice and T/F are my worst enemies. I'm great at essays and short answer. I'd have to see if I can find the Gladwell article, but it talked about stereotyping impacting performance. It talked about several studies, including one in mathematics that was given to women. When women were given the test (without being told their performance was evaluated via the test) they performed as well or better than men in the same room, but when they were told the test was an evaluation of their ability, they performed drasticly worse. Another study examined what happens when a person facing a stereotypy (but who is competent) takes an exam. The person slows down, tries harder, and does worse.

The point I gleaned from it was that when you have competent individual who isn't comfortable, they will try harder, which will actually cause poorer performance, reinforcing the 'try harder' advice, reinforcing the poor performance. His point (revealed by the studies) is that trying harder isn't helping, that moving faster, and not thinking so much is likely more applicable, with drilling on speed. That confidence needs to be built up, rather than focusing on trying harder. It isn't as easy to explain....and I plan on re-reading it.

It is also in his book 'what the dog saw' and there are certainly things he writes that I disagree with, but this gave me a different perspective. I always thought I just needed to 'buckle down, work harder, read more carefully.' Now I think that might be bad advice.
I have found that I do best on multiple choice out of everything. If I know the material, I can blaze through the test fairly accurately. I call it reflexive testing. The key is to not go so fast that I miss key words that change the question - like "not". T/F leads to over analysis and exploration of every facet of the question. I get bored writing essays. Short answer is ok, but sometimes the question is too open ended for me to hit the desired target.
 

sumstorm

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Ok, so this fascinates me - what's the disease and what's the vector? Seems so odd. I spent a lot of time with "wild" dogs in Iraq.

I have found that I do best on multiple choice out of everything. If I know the material, I can blaze through the test fairly accurately. I call it reflexive testing. The key is to not go so fast that I miss key words that change the question - like "not". T/F leads to over analysis and exploration of every facet of the question. I get bored writing essays. Short answer is ok, but sometimes the question is too open ended for me to hit the desired target.
I don't remember the pathogen (sorry) but it was in microbiology. I think it was Bulkholderia pseudomalliea (spelling is probably tragic.) a soil microbe in SE asia that infects lots of critters (horses, dogs, humans.)

So, how do you do on multiple- multiple choice? IE the ones that have A, B, C answers, but then D = A & B are correct, E= B & C are correct, F = none are correct? We have a lot of those, and they kill me.

I had to approach a professor during a final because I am overwhelmed by the details. The question was about a procedure and it basicly went something like 'you advise a client to do X. which of the following would not be something you inform the client of?' (I can't put more details out because it isn't academicly appropriate.) Then there was a list of 4 things, and then 3 of the A & B, or B & C type answers. I get panicky that there is some aspect of the details that I don't quite catch. I do not do well at all on these.

And I also don't do well with negative questions. IE 'you are an associate vet at a practice and a dog comes in with diarrhea. which of the following drugs are you not going to use?' unless there is a drug on that list that causes diarrhea as a side effect or is used to treat constipation, I really suck at picking out what the professor is trying to get at (that was not a question, but we have had very similar ones.) I think that is because I tend to think about what I WILL use and or major side effects rather than all the hundreds of drugs I WON'T use.

It makes me nervous about NAVLE
 

SocialStigma

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Getting animal/veterinary experience.

During the school year I have to choose between school (and extracurriculars) or getting experience (the closest vet clinic is 30 min bus ride away, involves a transfer, and I have no car at university) and I always go with school. I have straight As but also abysmal experience as a result because I really only volunteer during the summers.
 
Nov 12, 2010
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Major challenge is motivation/ focus.



I took two years of a major in environmental studies before I realized that was not my career choice. I have always wanted to do something in the medical field but thought it was an unrealistic goal. So this year I started to focus on my pre-vet studies. At times I feel on top of things and motivated but there is definitely instances where I get totally distracted and second guess myself. I believe that if you are truly passionate about something and do not force it to happen your goal will be within reach.

Another challenge I have is regretting some classes I took in my 1st two years as they contributed to bringing my average down. But since I have been taking classes I enjoy my marks are improving so that's a bonus.

Something I find helps is to remember 3 things: Focus/ Balance / Structure
 

Armymutt25A

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So, how do you do on multiple- multiple choice? IE the ones that have A, B, C answers, but then D = A & B are correct, E= B & C are correct, F = none are correct? We have a lot of those, and they kill me.
Those still don't bother me too much. Have to slow down a bit more, but it's still almost a reflex. I don't know if it's some primeval, Y-chromosome fueled, thrill of the hunt thing or what, but it seems to work for me.

I had to approach a professor during a final because I am overwhelmed by the details. The question was about a procedure and it basicly went something like 'you advise a client to do X. which of the following would not be something you inform the client of?' (I can't put more details out because it isn't academicly appropriate.) Then there was a list of 4 things, and then 3 of the A & B, or B & C type answers. I get panicky that there is some aspect of the details that I don't quite catch. I do not do well at all on these.
I suppose the question is clearer with more information, but as written, it seems to suggest the suspension of full disclosure with a client, leading them in a direction that you'd prefer. Goes against my imperative as a staff officer, I suppose. I'm used to providing the boss several courses of action, the pros and cons of each, and letting him decide. Not sure the prof would like my answer for a question like that.

And I also don't do well with negative questions. IE 'you are an associate vet at a practice and a dog comes in with diarrhea. which of the following drugs are you not going to use?' unless there is a drug on that list that causes diarrhea as a side effect or is used to treat constipation, I really suck at picking out what the professor is trying to get at (that was not a question, but we have had very similar ones.) I think that is because I tend to think about what I WILL use and or major side effects rather than all the hundreds of drugs I WON'T use.

It makes me nervous about NAVLE
A question phrased like that, I can handle. It appears pretty concrete and requires you to consider the drugs on the list from several angles. I can't really come up with the sort of question I was talking about, but there were several examples on the GRE. I think I'm a very scenario-based person. I don't do well with dissociated concepts. I'm also pretty short winded when it comes to writing, much the chagrin of many test writers. I tend to answer a question by getting right to the point and not embellishing. Probably why my writing score was so low. I'm a less Shakespeare and more Patton.
 

bee83

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Oct 30, 2010
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My biggest problem has always been a lack of confidence. While getting my first undergrad degree in art, I always felt less talented, less organized, and way behind everyone else in terms of skills, insight, concept, etc. It wasn't until my junior or senior year that I started to realize that I had it together way more than most of my classmates.
After my art degree, I hesitated big time on going back to school for my pre-vet pre-reqs, because I hadn't had chemistry or calculus or any kind of serious biology in highschool, and quite honestly I did not know if I would be able to keep up in those classes. Now I'm nearing the end of my pre-reqs with a science GPA somewhere around 3.7.
Now, approaching my application to vet school, I worry consistently over not having a high cumulative GPA, not having enough experience hours, and, in general not being "cut out" for what I'm trying to do.
If I can just get it through my head that I'm better than I tend to think I am, then things would be a lot easier for me.
 

bbeventer

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So, how do you do on multiple- multiple choice? IE the ones that have A, B, C answers, but then D = A & B are correct, E= B & C are correct, F = none are correct? We have a lot of those, and they kill me.
My last microbiology test was like that but the multiple choice went to J!! It was so confusing and stressful. The horrible thing was I knew the material just with so many options I couldn't handle it.... nor could the rest of the class I supposed. Out of 159 students.... 150 failed the exam.
 

Trilt

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I had a professor in high school (intro bio) who did multiple choice exams... except you had to bubble in ALL of the correct (or sometimes incorrect) response to the questions.

So a question could be "Which of the following is found in eye development in amphibians?" and the answer choices would list out usually five choices, A-E. If A, B & E were all found in eye development, you would have to bubble all three. Even if you just got A+B or any other variant, you would get it wrong.

It was pretty horrible, and I'm really glad that nobody else I've had in schooling has done it that way.


As far as my biggest challenge: pure overcommitment because of my want to finance my own education, and being late to the pre-vet game.
 

RaiderTXgirl

TEXAS A&M c/o 2015!
Mar 3, 2010
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First, I wanted to say hi to everyone! I'm semi-new here (found and signed up on SDN at the end of the last app cycle, and haven't been on in a while).

My biggest problem has always been a lack of confidence. While getting my first undergrad degree in art, I always felt less talented, less organized, and way behind everyone else in terms of skills, insight, concept, etc. It wasn't until my junior or senior year that I started to realize that I had it together way more than most of my classmates.
After my art degree, I hesitated big time on going back to school for my pre-vet pre-reqs, because I hadn't had chemistry or calculus or any kind of serious biology in highschool, and quite honestly I did not know if I would be able to keep up in those classes. Now I'm nearing the end of my pre-reqs with a science GPA somewhere around 3.7.
Now, approaching my application to vet school, I worry consistently over not having a high cumulative GPA, not having enough experience hours, and, in general not being "cut out" for what I'm trying to do.
If I can just get it through my head that I'm better than I tend to think I am, then things would be a lot easier for me.
Also, I wanted to say that bee, I totally know how you feel. I have had the same problem with confidence, and I am always comparing myself to other people. I didn't realize that I wanted to go to vet school until my third year in undergrad, and by that time my GPA was not too good. So, I have basically felt like the underdog ever since I decided to go pre-vet. Just thought you might want to know that you aren't alone!

What I can say is, you never know just how "together" you may already have it, until the ENTIRE app cycle is finished. Last year was my first time to apply, and I didn't expect to even get an interview anywhere (cum GPA = 3.1). In the end, I got an interview at Texas A&M (my IS), and made #19 on the waitlist! So, don't lose hope!:oops:
 

catscatscats

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Oct 2, 2010
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I had a professor in high school (intro bio) who did multiple choice exams... except you had to bubble in ALL of the correct (or sometimes incorrect) response to the questions.

So a question could be "Which of the following is found in eye development in amphibians?" and the answer choices would list out usually five choices, A-E. If A, B & E were all found in eye development, you would have to bubble all three. Even if you just got A+B or any other variant, you would get it wrong.

It was pretty horrible, and I'm really glad that nobody else I've had in schooling has done it that way.
oh my gosh my biochem professor had exams like this and it was brutal. and sometimes none of the answers would be right and he would expect you to just bubble in nothing. so much second guessing myself.
 

168135

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Definitely my biggest challenge has been, and I anticipate will always be, my issues with focus and motivation.
The other tough thing, I think, has been finding vet experiences. Sometimes I feel like I've had more bad luck with landing shadowing opportunities and jobs than anyone else I know.
I can relate you on both levels, minus the ADHD.

I was a heck of a lot more motivated in my first year of university. My living arragements were calm and quiet, but since I lived in res, I could go upstairs and study with my biology buds for tests. I always do better studying in groups. In my second year, I couldn't focus because there was too much drama going on in my living situation. So I moved out... and since I don't see my friends that often, I lost them as a resource. If I had a study date with a friend, it just seems to be a lot easier to get into that mood. Discussing the material with a friend just makes it stick easier for me. This year, I've found that having my own lab to study in makes it easier. There is just the right amount of traffic coming into the lab and those little breaks make it easier to remain focused and not become bored with the material.

I have mild test-taking anxiety. I tend to be less anxious where we don't have a time limit (finals for example) but more anxious when there are stations and you have 1 minute per station (lab exams). I usually spend the first 10 minutes or so freaking out, or if I don't know a question, I'll freak out a little bit. Timed exams don't really allow me to do that :p

I have bad luck when it comes to volunteering and working. I must of sent out a dozen and made a dozen phone calls over the last couple of years to try to land a volunteer position. They always say "It shouldn't be a problem! I have to talk to the manager first. We'll call you!" They don't call... so I call... and we end up playing phone tag for a while... and two months later, they finally figure out that they don't really need me. When I did land a position, it was 1 hour out of my way and the clinic wasn't open in the evenings. I'm a student... the only free time I have is in the evenings. I have to be very selective as to where I volunteer in the evenings. The bus system isn't set up well enough to serve the needs of the public :rolleyes: I would have loved to spend my Sundays at the shelter, but the bus doesn't run at all on Sunday... and it's like an $8 cab ride.

In my grade 12 year, I wasn't taking a full course load, so I decided to apply for a second job passed out ~12 resumes to places that claimed they were hiring. ONE CALL BACK. And I didn't get the job. My little brother is experiencing the same problem. Unless you know management well, they just toss your application. That's just how it is in my hometown. I've also had bad luck applying for jobs in university and ended up going back to my fastfood job. Although he did hire me on the spot... it would have been nice to have something closer on campus or something related to what I was doing.

It's hard not to get frusterated over situations like this! But I'm trying. I did manage to land myself a research position last year, which lead me to doing an honours thesis and I'm having so much fun doing it. I also decided to go on the VIDA trip to make up for my lack of veterinary experience and that seemed to boost my confidence.
 

sumstorm

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Veterinarian
Unless you know management well, they just toss your application. That's just how it is in my hometown.
This is about learning to network. I hate to say it, but the ability to charm and network is very important. And it isn't just important for obtaining positions or getting into school, it will help with clients and co-workers. Folks say 'oh, I can't do that on a cold call.' But you can. Find out as much info as you can about the practice and the folks working at the practice. If you find out the manager is really into wildlife rehab, you can spark a conversation, and that conversation can provide a connection that can end up in a job or a clue to a job at a different place. If you find the vet has an interest in rehab, you can ask to observe that, making a big deal of how unusual it is. You don't need to be a fake, but you need to make sure folks know that you are interested. Not just 'give me a job' interested, but 'want to be part of this place' interested. And it shows people skills, which make you a more appealing candidate (since obviously you will be working with people as much, if not more, than animals.)
 

168135

Guest
10+ Year Member
Sep 20, 2007
1,415
4
30
Status
Pre-Veterinary
I was mostly speaking about minimum wage jobs in retail and fast food. It's very difficult to land one of those jobs, and I'm not the only who hasn't been so lucky. A lot of my close friends either can't get work when they come home, or are unable to land enough hours to make it worth it.

I had no problem getting to volunteer at the vet clinic while I was in high school... I just had to be persistant... expressing interest in applying to the vet tech program probably helped. I ended up developing a pretty good relationship with two of the doctors and when I wanted to gain hours for my trip this summer, they agreed to let me come in on the days they were scheduled.

I've had trouble getting my foot in the door at larger clinics here and after three years, threw in the towel. I do have my foot in the door at a small clinic. There are 6 employees total and I've probed them for help and suggestions. I got nothing lol. It would be awesome to spend more time volunteering, but I'm finally happy with the hours and diversity I've accumulated. I'm not going to give up on getting more, but if I have no luck, I'm not going to get down on myself like I used to.
 

thaowey

7+ Year Member
Apr 24, 2009
131
0
biggest challenge: reminding myself why i want to do this. I have 2 other passions in life and am always thinking about dropping this to do the others [which is photojournalism and/or media productions]. no lo se...
 
Jul 1, 2010
20
0
Status
Pre-Veterinary
Gee, where to start? I also struggle with low confidence. Add in a prolonged struggle with major depression, problems with extreme procrastination, and a history of being stronger in the humanities and you have yourself a perfect storm of what may seem like insurmountable challenges.

I'll be the first to admit that I don't really fit the mold of a prototypical vet student but what's normal nowadays anyhow? Luckily, I'm old enough to have dealt with these issues long enough to have developed some pretty useful coping mechanisms/strategies. It's been rough but as long as I remind myself that most of my problems are only in my head, I tend to get on pretty well.