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White Coat Ceremony Clothing (Ladies)

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buckeyegal1129

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I was just wondering where any girls got their outfits for white coat/what did you wear. I heard white coat is mostly business casual but wanted to hear some insight (sorry this is a pretty trivial question compared to the rest of the questions posted on this site but I would really appreciate any help!)
 
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Crayola227

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I went to AE I think.

I got a nice knee length bright red dress. It was sleeveless but not strappy, which normally I wouldn't do, but we didn't spend much time out of our coats before getting them, and once I got my coat I didn't take it off.

narciso-rodriguez-red-knee-length-sheath-dress-product-1-2853548-150166394.jpeg


Conservative neckline always, never too short!!

This is probably the "sexiest" thing I ever wore in my entire career. But I wanted to be pretty that day, there were no patients, and the weather and spirit of my institution, plus putting the coat over it, made me think I could get away with it, so I did.
 
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Business to business casual. No plunging necklines. If you wear a dress, try for one that will be longer than your short white coat.
 
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icd22

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I wore a similar dress to above... a cream Ann Klein dress, although I wish I chose something with more color. Definitely don't wear something that you can wear to a club
 
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Inventor of Post-Its

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100% agree with looking at photos of past white coat ceremonies at your school. At my school all the girls wore dresses and you'd look kind of strange showing up in "business casual." And a rich solid color to set off that brand new white coat is always a safe bet. :)
 
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SurfingDoctor

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I realize this is oriented to women's clothing, but I wore flip flops to both the white coat ceremony and medical school graduation. It was hot (temperature wise, not my appearance). Needless to say, no one will remember what you wore but you.
 

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I wore something very similar to the above in a more neutral color. Some of the girls had stuff that was a little more party dress-esque and less professional. I'm glad I erred on the more professional side...you meet your professors, the dean, classmates' parents, etc. Was also nice to be able to use the photos for internship/scholarship applications and stuff.

ETA: Also see if your school (or upperclassmen on FB) has photos of the white coat ceremony in the past. Might help you get an idea of the trends/traditions at your school.

Booo
 

Dr. Death

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If you want to show your future classmates and professors you're gunning for the top, wear a dress an inch or two shorter than your white coat.
 
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Crayola227

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I wore something very similar to the above in a more neutral color. Some of the girls had stuff that was a little more party dress-esque and less professional. I'm glad I erred on the more professional side...you meet your professors, the dean, classmates' parents, etc. Was also nice to be able to use the photos for internship/scholarship applications and stuff.

Yeah, that was why I felt like I could justify the color, because so many others will wear things that are less professional in terms of length, strappiness, neckline cut, sheer material, crazy patterns, etc.

With the coat on and the right cut and material, most solid colors are fine, even if they are bright. (don't go nuts with fluorescents)

Ditto looking at past pictures. Also, I felt like I looked like a future physician in my dress and coat. Sure, a super hawt one with big boobs in lipstick red, but hey, that's not unprofessional!

So use that as a standard. When in doubt, I say go more conservative. The only day I ever took a "chance" was white coat ceremony.
 
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Lannister

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Just don't wear a dress that's shorter than your white coat.


Sent from my iPad using SDN mobile
 
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raiderette

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Please wear shoes that you can walk in with confidence. Too many women wobble across the stage.
 
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psychhopefull2016

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I wore a black dress with a bright colored floral print that was a conservative length and conservative heels!
 
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cbrons

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You don't do it for yourself.
You do it for parents... who should wait until graduation, since graduation actually means you accomplished something more than sitting your butt in a chair. It's amazing how many people at our white coat ceremony ended up failing out of school. Lol. Some memory they'll have of a celebration that meant nothing. Not to mention all the ones who dropped down a year or two for various reasons.

No need to respond... I know I am very cynical.
 
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raiderette

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Actually I did it for a grandparent that will probably not make it to graduation, but I am the first one to graduate college, the only grandkid without a criminal record or a baby before 21
 
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GoljansRightBicep

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This may be controversial, but I'd definitely say you should wear your white coat. At least to the second half of the ceremony.
 
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Crayola227

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My parent and the whole family came and it was captured on family video, the last one we ever had together since they died before graduation.

Matriculation can be a very meaningful rite of passage.

Plus, what if it went the other way, and YOU died before graduation?

Don't you want the people who care enough to come and obtain mementos to have them?
 
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JB50

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Actually I did it for a grandparent that will probably not make it to graduation, but I am the first one to graduate college, the only grandkid without a criminal record or a baby before 21

You should be proud of yourself. Obviously the white coat ceremony means a lot more to you than some of us.
 

Dr. Death

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You do it for parents... who should wait until graduation, since graduation actually means you accomplished something more than sitting your butt in a chair. It's amazing how many people at our white coat ceremony ended up failing out of school. Lol. Some memory they'll have of a celebration that meant nothing. Not to mention all the ones who dropped down a year or two for various reasons.

No need to respond... I know I am very cynical.
"Let's celebrate you before you do anything worth celebrating!" I went for my wife, otherwise I don't believe in celebrating mediocrity and meaningless events. Hence why I didn't go to my college graduation and wouldn't have gone to my high school graduation if I'd had the choice.
 
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JB50

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"Let's celebrate you before you do anything worth celebrating!" I went for my wife, otherwise I don't believe in celebrating mediocrity and meaningless events. Hence why I didn't go to my college graduation and wouldn't have gone to my high school graduation if I'd had the choice.

You sound like fun. The bolded is a bit ignorant, no? That would mean you don't think getting into medical school is an achievement at all which I think the overwhelming majority of us would disagree to some magnitude.

Your child speaks his first word, you gonna ignore it or not praise it because you can talk in sentences?
 
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Crayola227

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What you are celebrating is getting your white coat and taking the oath for the first time. The White Coat Ceremony is not just a celebration. It is a Ceremony. It has real and practical purpose. It is not optional for a reason. You cannot see patients until you have done this.

If we've really lost the moral, ethical, practical understanding of the importance of these symbols, rituals, and more importantly the solemnity of these promises that you are making....

They are the reason that as soon as the next day for some people, they will be a part of other people's lives in ways that no other person can.

-hold a 14 year old girl's hand while she has a rape kit collected, while her parents wait outside
-share the tears of a wife who has just been told her husband is going to die in the next 3 days
-pull the ET tube of son about to take his last breath in front his mother
-be the one to "catch" someone's baby (and not drop it!)
-during surgery run your gloved fingers around the inside of someone's abdomen feeling for cancer
-get a hug from a patient thanking you for saving their life
-basically there is no question denied you to ask in the pursuit of helping someone

Maybe you did or watched some of this as pre-meds. Doesn't matter. Matriculation is a game changer. You're given a white coat and the title to introduce yourself as Student Doctor Douchebag as you do the above things. You are already being given permission to reflect on the rest of us.

Let me say it again, you TAKE AN OATH.

Declaration of Geneva, as currently published by the World Medical Association[6] reads:

At the time of being admitted as a member of the medical profession:

  • I solemnly pledge to consecrate my life to the service of humanity;
  • I will give to my teachers the respect and gratitude that is their due;
  • I will practice my profession with conscience and dignity;
  • The health of my patient will be my first consideration;
  • I will respect the secrets that are confided in me, even after the patient has died;
  • I will maintain by all the means in my power, the honour and the noble traditions of the medical profession;
  • My colleagues will be my sisters and brothers;
  • I will not permit considerations of age, disease or disability, creed, ethnic origin, gender, nationality, political affiliation, race, sexual orientation, social standing or any other factor to intervene between my duty and my patient;
  • I will maintain the utmost respect for human life;
  • I will not use my medical knowledge to violate human rights and civil liberties, even under threat;
  • I make these promises solemnly, freely and upon my honor
I don't know, solemnly pledging to consecrate my life to the service of humanity, my conscience, my dignity, honour and noble traditions, my duty, respect for human life, pledging not put human rights and liberties ahead of my own LIFE,

all of these things I take pretty seriously.

Being a professional is a big deal. Matriculation day is the first day that you being practicing your profession. The standard for how you live your life and your legal responsibilities to society change from that day forward.

**** that I thought I was "OK" to do as a pre-med, became forever denied to me after that day, were I live with intregity to my word.

24/7 standard of behavior that only applies to those of you who do this, begins now.
 
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JB50

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Declaration of Geneva, as currently published by the World Medical Association[6] reads:

At the time of being admitted as a member of the medical profession:

  • I solemnly pledge to consecrate my life to the service of humanity;
  • I will give to my teachers the respect and gratitude that is their due;
  • I will practice my profession with conscience and dignity;
  • The health of my patient will be my first consideration;
  • I will respect the secrets that are confided in me, even after the patient has died;
  • I will maintain by all the means in my power, the honour and the noble traditions of the medical profession;
  • My colleagues will be my sisters and brothers;
  • I will not permit considerations of age, disease or disability, creed, ethnic origin, gender, nationality, political affiliation, race, sexual orientation, social standing or any other factor to intervene between my duty and my patient;
  • I will maintain the utmost respect for human life;
  • I will not use my medical knowledge to violate human rights and civil liberties, even under threat;
  • I make these promises solemnly, freely and upon my honor
.
giphy.gif
 
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Dr. Death

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What you are celebrating is getting your white coat and taking the oath for the first time. The White Coat Ceremony is not just a celebration. It is a Ceremony. It has real and practical purpose. It is not optional for a reason. You cannot see patients until you have done this.

If we've really lost the moral, ethical, practical understanding of the importance of these symbols, rituals, and more importantly the solemnity of these promises that you are making....

They are the reason that as soon as the next day for some people, they will be a part of other people's lives in ways that no other person can.

-hold a 14 year old girl's hand while she has a rape kit collected, while her parents wait outside
-share the tears of a wife who has just been told her husband is going to die in the next 3 days
-pull the ET tube of son about to take his last breath in front his mother
-be the one to "catch" someone's baby (and not drop it!)
-during surgery run your gloved fingers around the inside of someone's abdomen feeling for cancer
-get a hug from a patient thanking you for saving their life
-basically there is no question denied you to ask in the pursuit of helping someone

Maybe you did or watched some of this as pre-meds. Doesn't matter. Matriculation is a game changer. You're given a white coat and the title to introduce yourself as Student Doctor Douchebag as you do the above things. You are already being given permission to reflect on the rest of us.

Let me say it again, you TAKE AN OATH.

Declaration of Geneva, as currently published by the World Medical Association[6] reads:

At the time of being admitted as a member of the medical profession:

  • I solemnly pledge to consecrate my life to the service of humanity;
  • I will give to my teachers the respect and gratitude that is their due;
  • I will practice my profession with conscience and dignity;
  • The health of my patient will be my first consideration;
  • I will respect the secrets that are confided in me, even after the patient has died;
  • I will maintain by all the means in my power, the honour and the noble traditions of the medical profession;
  • My colleagues will be my sisters and brothers;
  • I will not permit considerations of age, disease or disability, creed, ethnic origin, gender, nationality, political affiliation, race, sexual orientation, social standing or any other factor to intervene between my duty and my patient;
  • I will maintain the utmost respect for human life;
  • I will not use my medical knowledge to violate human rights and civil liberties, even under threat;
  • I make these promises solemnly, freely and upon my honor
I don't know, solemnly pledging to consecrate my life to the service of humanity, my conscience, my dignity, honour and noble traditions, my duty, respect for human life, pledging not put human rights and liberties ahead of my own LIFE,

all of these things I take pretty seriously.

Being a professional is a big deal. Matriculation day is the first day that you being practicing your profession. The standard for how you live your life and your legal responsibilities to society change from that day forward.

**** that I thought I was "OK" to do as a pre-med, became forever denied to me after that day, were I live with intregity to my word.

24/7 standard of behavior that only applies to those of you who do this, begins now.
Well put. I'll think of it differently in the future.
 
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Dr. Death

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You sound like fun. The bolded is a bit ignorant, no? That would mean you don't think getting into medical school is an achievement at all which I think the overwhelming majority of us would disagree to some magnitude.

Your child speaks his first word, you gonna ignore it or not praise it because you can talk in sentences?
It is an achievement for some people, I didn't feel that way. When my daughter said her first word I praised her for accomplishing something, not being accepted to potentially accomplish something in 4 years.

Crayola eloquently ended this discussion tho.
 

Crayola227

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Well put. I'll think of it differently in the future.

Awesome!

totally wasn't trying to shame anyone, really was just trying to pump you guys up! I can compare White Coat to Grad for you.

My examples of stuff you get to do, mostly based on my real life MS1-4

My loved one was there to see me do the Oath the first time, and not the at Graduation. You do it a second time when they confer the title and diploma, but it's an affirmation, not an initiation. There was something more special to me doing it the first time, first white coat, before being forever after an imposter in a white coat.

The length changes after Graduation, and there is a graduation glow, but there is no initiation ceremony for residency unless you count interview stuff, pre-mixer, or orientation. The thrill of "Dr. MD" and signing Rxs fades soooooooo fast intern year. It lasts like a day before you go from feeling accomplished to feeling like you really have no business doing this at all and JFC are these people crazy for giving me these responsibilities??

Plus, White Coat day you are for sure embarking on the journey you want at the time.
Graduation Day, you're post-Match and might be reflecting on not getting the residency location you wanted, hell, not even getting the career you wanted. You might be reflecting on your failed relationship, how much weight you've gained, and how you haven't spent much time with your family, here they are and you're so jaded and exhausted to try to "bask," and you're going to move away to be even busier.

Pre-med-->Matriculant is way better.
Graduation ---> Residency, yuck.

You're less burnt out, you will never be more idealistic, hopeful, excited about the profession as you are White Coat Day going forward.

****, I'm trying to pump you up saying how it's all downhill.

No way, you are starting a hard road, but the beginning of this journey truly is worth celebrating to its fullest. Some of the best partying is done the first week, even lifelong friendships and marriages begin day 1!!
It does get more exciting from here. Classmates, experiences, patients, stories, knowledge.

I envy you guys doing White Coat Ceremony. Looking back it was one of the best "big days" in my life with my family, and started one of the most important chapters in my life.
 
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cbrons

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What you are celebrating is getting your white coat and taking the oath for the first time. The White Coat Ceremony is not just a celebration. It is a Ceremony. It has real and practical purpose. It is not optional for a reason. You cannot see patients until you have done this.

If we've really lost the moral, ethical, practical understanding of the importance of these symbols, rituals, and more importantly the solemnity of these promises that you are making....

They are the reason that as soon as the next day for some people, they will be a part of other people's lives in ways that no other person can.

-hold a 14 year old girl's hand while she has a rape kit collected, while her parents wait outside
-share the tears of a wife who has just been told her husband is going to die in the next 3 days
-pull the ET tube of son about to take his last breath in front his mother
-be the one to "catch" someone's baby (and not drop it!)
-during surgery run your gloved fingers around the inside of someone's abdomen feeling for cancer
-get a hug from a patient thanking you for saving their life
-basically there is no question denied you to ask in the pursuit of helping someone

Maybe you did or watched some of this as pre-meds. Doesn't matter. Matriculation is a game changer. You're given a white coat and the title to introduce yourself as Student Doctor Douchebag as you do the above things. You are already being given permission to reflect on the rest of us.

Let me say it again, you TAKE AN OATH.

Declaration of Geneva, as currently published by the World Medical Association[6] reads:

At the time of being admitted as a member of the medical profession:

  • I solemnly pledge to consecrate my life to the service of humanity;
  • I will give to my teachers the respect and gratitude that is their due;
  • I will practice my profession with conscience and dignity;
  • The health of my patient will be my first consideration;
  • I will respect the secrets that are confided in me, even after the patient has died;
  • I will maintain by all the means in my power, the honour and the noble traditions of the medical profession;
  • My colleagues will be my sisters and brothers;
  • I will not permit considerations of age, disease or disability, creed, ethnic origin, gender, nationality, political affiliation, race, sexual orientation, social standing or any other factor to intervene between my duty and my patient;
  • I will maintain the utmost respect for human life;
  • I will not use my medical knowledge to violate human rights and civil liberties, even under threat;
  • I make these promises solemnly, freely and upon my honor
I don't know, solemnly pledging to consecrate my life to the service of humanity, my conscience, my dignity, honour and noble traditions, my duty, respect for human life, pledging not put human rights and liberties ahead of my own LIFE,

all of these things I take pretty seriously.

Being a professional is a big deal. Matriculation day is the first day that you being practicing your profession. The standard for how you live your life and your legal responsibilities to society change from that day forward.

**** that I thought I was "OK" to do as a pre-med, became forever denied to me after that day, were I live with intregity to my word.

24/7 standard of behavior that only applies to those of you who do this, begins now.
The only oath that matters is the Hippocratic oath that you take at graduation - the same one physicians (not "members of a medical profession" or "providers") have been taking for centuries. The Hippocratic oath was created exclusively for physicians (again, not for "providers").

Our ancestors did not have a "white coat ceremony." And today, virtually every "medical professional" from pharmacists to medical assistant students to nursing students to respiratory therapy students have a so-called "white coat ceremony."
The white coat does not mean anything.

My schools White Coat ceremony had us taking some stupid ass social justice warrior non-sense credo.

You are not "entering into a medical profession" at your white coat ceremony. You enter it upon graduation.

"Student Doctor" is a nonsensical term that means nothing these days. Todays med students are mostly shadowing.

The impressive thing isn't getting into med school, its getting through med school.
 

dpmd

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I realize this is oriented to women's clothing, but I wore flip flops to both the white coat ceremony and medical school graduation. It was hot (temperature wise, not my appearance). Needless to say, no one will remember what you wore but you.
Even I don't remember what I wore. Probably slacks and a simple top since that was my go to professional outfit (I am not that into skirts/dresses and heels).
 

Taddy Mason

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Let me rephrase: OP is still expected to go to hers and wear clothes. And if she wants to go, who cares what you think of her ceremony?

OP asked a simple question about clothes. If you want to start a thread about how dumb the ceremony is, do it, but that's not what this thread is. I honestly couldn't care less about the white coat ceremony, but you guys are being ridiculous. Go be ~edgy~ somewhere else.
OP's question was about clothes in relationship to her white coat ceremony. The discussion you find fault with pertains to the white coat ceremony, an aspect of OP's question (also, last time I checked Student Doctor Network is not a fashion forum). One could easily argue that the discussion related to the Hippocratic Oath is more off topic...
 
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