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I am very interested in becoming a neuropsychologist. I find it to be a very interesting field but I also want to be a child psychologist. Can someone tell me the steps in detail to become a neuropsychologist and a child psychologist? What do you have to study? How hard are the subjects? Where do they both work? What is their salary? I find the salaries given online not correct. They seem a little too low for the years it takes to study. I know they dont earn as much as a doctors until a few years on the job. If anyone who is a child psychologist or a neuropsychologisy or currently studying to become one would answer I would appreciate it so much. I think these jobs are more interesting than a psychiatrist because there is always something new. Is it worth studying for all those years and can you afford a 40,000 dollar car for example and a 250,000 house with the salary? As you can tell I am asking about the salary because I would rather be a doctor than study for as long as a neuropsychologist and earn less. I want a job of course I will enjoy. Thank you. This is a lot. But I want to be fully informed about them. No rude/arrogant comments. Thank you
 

CheetahGirl

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I am very interested in becoming a neuropsychologist. I find it to be a very interesting field but I also want to be a child psychologist. Can someone tell me the steps in detail to become a neuropsychologist and a child psychologist? What do you have to study? How hard are the subjects? Where do they both work? What is their salary? I find the salaries given online not correct. They seem a little too low for the years it takes to study. I know they dont earn as much as a doctors until a few years on the job. If anyone who is a child psychologist or a neuropsychologisy or currently studying to become one would answer I would appreciate it so much. I think these jobs are more interesting than a psychiatrist because there is always something new. Is it worth studying for all those years and can you afford a 40,000 dollar car for example and a 250,000 house with the salary? As you can tell I am asking about the salary because I would rather be a doctor than study for as long as a neuropsychologist and earn less. I want a job of course I will enjoy. Thank you. This is a lot. But I want to be fully informed about them. No rude/arrogant comments. Thank you

Your best bet is to search old SDN threads for your answers, and then pose, more specific questions. All of what you have asked, has been asked here before...and frankly, most of the base information (what do you have to study, how hard are the subjects, even starting salary ranges) will still be applicable in those threads.

Also, if you'd rather be a doctor (physician, I assume), then it doesn't make sense for any of the child or neuropsychologists on SDN to convince you otherwise, right? Do a some homework, perhaps even some soul-searching, and then come back to us.
 
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Psychiatrists make way more money and training length is roughly equivalent although they start getting paid earlier. The steps to become either a psychologist who works with kids or a neuropsychologist are about the same until much later in training. The first step in becoming a psychologist is to learn the science by delving into the research aspects.
 
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Pragma

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As you can tell I am asking about the salary because I would rather be a doctor than study for as long as a neuropsychologist and earn less.

I think you've answered your own question. The average neuropsychologist makes less than the average physician. There is plenty of variance. Check out the neuropsychologist salary survey for more details.
 
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Solid advice above. Seems to be a big need for child assessment/neuropsych in my area, particularly as relates to assessing for developmental delays. Do well in undergrad so your you're competitive for a funded clinical doctoral program, get training there in child assessment and intervention, and then look for specialty training in pre and post doc internships. Depending on where you are right now, you're still a good decade or so away from the good salary.

As an aside, 250k buys you a starter home in my neck of the woods!
 
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As a person who just went through this process to become a pediatric neuropsychologist, I can tell you I don't do it for the money. The field is fascinating and I get to work with amazing clinicians, parents, and children every day. It appears to be a very competitive field so I would suggest making sure your undergraduate grades, clinical experience, and GRE scores are bulletproof before you apply to programs. I know many students now that are almost required to complete a masters program in clinical psychology before they are accepted into a Ph.D. program.

If you want to be a neuropsychologist, look up the Houston Guidelines as it outlines the steps needed. My background is four years of undergrad with a major in psychology, and then six years in graduate school to finish my doctorate (including a one-year pre-doctoral internship). I was studying and slaving away reading articles about how lead poisoning affects the brain while all of my friends were settling down and having nice careers. But you're not done once you graduate with your Ph.D., to be a neuropsychologist you then need two years supervised post-doctoral experience. If you want to be a clinical child psychologist, I believe it is just one year of post-doctoral supervision. And, there's more, because you also need to then pass the EPPP, which is the licensing exam. If you go straight through it can all be completed before the ripe age of 31. Like I said, I don't do it for the money and it is true that we don't necessarily make as much as physicians. But I can say that my starting salary will allow me to buy a decent car and my husband and I own a home. ;)
 
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AcronymAllergy

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And in addition to the above, while it's not yet required in many settings/places, there's also the boarding process in neuropsychology/pediatric neuropsychology. It generally consists of a credential/training review, written exam, submission of one or more practice samples, and oral exams.
 
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And in addition to the above, while it's not yet required in many settings/places, there's also the boarding process in neuropsychology/pediatric neuropsychology. It generally consists of a credential/training review, written exam, submission of one or more practice samples, and oral exams.

Ah yes, how could I ever forget about boarding! ;)
 
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