**Official 2024 OMFS PASS/Interviews/Match/Non-Match**

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For me, 1 extra year at Case was worth it. 2 extra years was a very hard sell. There were a handful of programs that I thought might make it worth it, but not most.
What’s the cost of med school at Case? You pay for 2 or 3 years?

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Seemed like quite a few of the people I had talked to were glad they did a 6 yr program. I agree what has been said about some of the unmatched 6 year programs. It was crazy to consider how much $$$ medical school would cost when there were other programs that covered a lot of the tuition or tuition was very low
 
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matching in a 6 year program out of school, even if its more expensive, is better than doing the 1-3 years as a gpr resident/non-cat to get into a 4 year program or a competitive 6 year program that pays for everything.

the opportunity cost is large ( a few million large). Apply everywhere.

Med school is a joke compared to an unaccredited position where they work you to the bone and still don't guarantee a match.
 
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Long time lurker here and recent matchee (is this a word?), but figured I'd give my two cents. I interviewed at a decent amount of the programs that went unmatched. Most were pretty unimpressive. I don't know much about Buffalo or NE programs but I'd be interested to hear. Ive heard about continued instability at LSU but that's nothing new, plus it seems to have become mostly a cancer program. I realized most of the "big name" southern programs are pretty lackluster and I would advise applicants to look into programs you don't hear as much of. There are a lot of slept on OMFS programs that are killin it.
Congrats on matching @LurkingOMFS, if you didn't match to NOLA or Buffalo you're already winning. In fact, for those of you who applied to both of those programs and didn't match at all, you're probably winning too.

I agree with your statement about “big name” programs. They were perhaps once upon a time considered elite with high appeal. Today those days are over, if they ever did exist, because generally speaking they prepare you no better than any other program would.

From what I understand, Buffalo has also become a heavy craniofacial and cancer program, chiefly because of their chair. Take a look at their instagram. Are residents ever seen on it? Are daily procedures seen? It seems like an instagram made just so the chair can repost content from his personal account. Residents at NOLA are sure as hell not doing most of the procedures posted on their account, but at least they give off the illusion that they are. I believe Buffalo has also started a craniofacial fellowship which, like at any other program, could leave residents unaffected or with less cutting and more suctioning. However, from what has been said about their chair; he prefers to either let his fellows cut, let other rotating services cut, or do the cutting himself. I suspect Buffalos residents will graduate with high proficiency in both retracting and suctioning.

But you know, there’s that adage “the best program is the one you match to.” Because when it’s all said and done, everyone will graduate with the same certificate(s) and the right to practice oral and maxillofacial surgery.

I’ll chime in about the overly debated topic of 4-year vs 6-year, briefly. There’s no arguing that going to medical school provides you with a wealth of knowledge and fundamental understanding of medicine that you wouldn’t otherwise get if you chose the 4-year route. Even amongst the 6-year programs there is variance, depending on how much time/which years you spend in medical school. With the exception of 4th year because it’s truly a waste of time, at least for OMFS residents. When it comes down to it, I believe people decide to obtain the MD for three reasons. 1.Ego 2.They've been life-long learners and truly appreciate and desire the knowledge gained 3. They're interested in a fellowship and think they might need it.

I apologize for the rambling/wordiness. I could talk about the good/bad/ugly about residency ad nauseam. Perhaps I'll start a subreddit...:unsure:
 
Congrats on matching @LurkingOMFS, if you didn't match to NOLA or Buffalo you're already winning. In fact, for those of you who applied to both of those programs and didn't match at all, you're probably winning too.

I agree with your statement about “big name” programs. They were perhaps once upon a time considered elite with high appeal. Today those days are over, if they ever did exist, because generally speaking they prepare you no better than any other program would.

From what I understand, Buffalo has also become a heavy craniofacial and cancer program, chiefly because of their chair. Take a look at their instagram. Are residents ever seen on it? Are daily procedures seen? It seems like an instagram made just so the chair can repost content from his personal account. Residents at NOLA are sure as hell not doing most of the procedures posted on their account, but at least they give off the illusion that they are. I believe Buffalo has also started a craniofacial fellowship which, like at any other program, could leave residents unaffected or with less cutting and more suctioning. However, from what has been said about their chair; he prefers to either let his fellows cut, let other rotating services cut, or do the cutting himself. I suspect Buffalos residents will graduate with high proficiency in both retracting and suctioning.

But you know, there’s that adage “the best program is the one you match to.” Because when it’s all said and done, everyone will graduate with the same certificate(s) and the right to practice oral and maxillofacial surgery.

I’ll chime in about the overly debated topic of 4-year vs 6-year, briefly. There’s no arguing that going to medical school provides you with a wealth of knowledge and fundamental understanding of medicine that you wouldn’t otherwise get if you chose the 4-year route. Even amongst the 6-year programs there is variance, depending on how much time/which years you spend in medical school. With the exception of 4th year because it’s truly a waste of time, at least for OMFS residents. When it comes down to it, I believe people decide to obtain the MD for three reasons. 1.Ego 2.They've been life-long learners and truly appreciate and desire the knowledge gained 3. They're interested in a fellowship and think they might need it.

I apologize for the rambling/wordiness. I could talk about the good/bad/ugly about residency ad nauseam. Perhaps I'll start a subreddit...:unsure:
4. They preferred a 4 year but matched to a 6 year bc it meant matching now instead of doing a non-cat/a second non-cat and re-applying.

One of the programs I externed at with both 4/6, the faculty said the 4 is much more competitive even though their med school tuition was fairly low. I applied to both 4/6 and was open about it, there were residents at every 6 year I interviewed at that also applied to both which surprised me as the rhetoric on here leans into that a stark decision is made by 6 yr applicants to choose the MD route bc of ego/life-long learner/fellowship (It seems many 6 yr residents do fall into this category) when there might also be a sizable group of applicants with the desire to be an oral surgeon no matter which path the match grants them.
 
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4. They preferred a 4 year but matched to a 6 year bc it meant matching now instead of doing a non-cat/a second non-cat and re-applying.

One of the programs I externed at with both 4/6, the faculty said the 4 is much more competitive even though their med school tuition was fairly low. I applied to both 4/6 and was open about it, there were residents at every 6 year I interviewed at that also applied to both which surprised me as the rhetoric on here leans into that a stark decision is made by 6 yr applicants to choose the MD route bc of ego/life-long learner/fellowship (It seems many 6 yr residents do fall into this category) when there might also be a sizable group of applicants with the desire to be an oral surgeon no matter which path the match grants them.
I agree there's definitely a group of applicants that fall into that category. But I'd argue they didn't WANT the MD and were instead settling or "accepting" of it. I guess I was more so speaking of those with the "MD or bust" mentality. From speaking with applicants, I think applying to both 4/6-year has become the norm in recent years. There seems to be less and less people applying to just one or the other.
 
I think it ultimately comes down to the how applicants/programs are ranked, and for the applicants, those rankings are influenced by how they perceive the program.

I can’t speak for all programs but there seems to be more transparency, coming from residents, of how residencies truly function compared to what’s presented on paper. I know LSU NO and Buffalo both gave presentations reporting procedure numbers that are completely false, rotations no longer in existence, etc. These programs are becoming fellowship heavy with department chairs who seem to only care about making a name for themselves, at the expense of resident training/education. There are many programs like this, I’m sure we’ve all heard about BU. And believe me, that’s just the tip of the iceberg, you won’t know what a program is truly like until you’re a resident.

So, when applicants realize these things, of course they’re going to rank these programs low or not at all.
What is it about BU?
 
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What is it about BU?

Has been known to be malignant historically (though I think that personality is no longer there). The biggest problem in my opinion is the cost of medical school. That on top of living in a pricy city like Boston make it tough for some applicants
 
i am just an uneducated D2 but I do feel like this forum would be a great place for more communication about pros/cons of programs people have externed at. that can obviously turn malignant but I did envision that being more common here
 
i am just an uneducated D2 but I do feel like this forum would be a great place for more communication about pros/cons of programs people have externed at. that can obviously turn malignant but I did envision that being more common here
Our world is a small one, so be careful speaking badly about programs online. You're right, externships can show you the ugly side of a program, but I wouldn't post it. You can definitely tell your fellow applicants in person however.

Trust me, for malignant programs, word spreads. Once you start thinking about applying, ask the D4s at your school and the residents at your home program. We could talk for hours about the pros and cons of different programs.
 
Our world is a small one, so be careful speaking badly about programs online. You're right, externships can show you the ugly side of a program, but I wouldn't post it. You can definitely tell your fellow applicants in person however.

Trust me, for malignant programs, word spreads. Once you start thinking about applying, ask the D4s at your school and the residents at your home program. We could talk for hours about the pros and cons of different programs.
Shouldn’t students be able post online anonymously without having this type of unfounded paranoia? I mean, really, would an institution hack this site, find out someone’s IP address, dox them, and then keep them from graduation? We should be able to confidently post and freely voice valid concerns. Nothing will change if nothing is said.
 
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Has been known to be malignant historically (though I think that personality is no longer there). The biggest problem in my opinion is the cost of medical school. That on top of living in a pricy city like Boston make it tough for some applicants
Thank you. I didnt know about their malignancy. The program director has been the same from years now. so what changes are we expecting?
 
Long time lurker here and recent matchee (is this a word?), but figured I'd give my two cents. I interviewed at a decent amount of the programs that went unmatched. Most were pretty unimpressive. I don't know much about Buffalo or NE programs but I'd be interested to hear. Ive heard about continued instability at LSU but that's nothing new, plus it seems to have become mostly a cancer program. I realized most of the "big name" southern programs are pretty lackluster and I would advise applicants to look into programs you don't hear as much of. There are a lot of slept on OMFS programs that are killin it.
What programs are slept on
 
We like to keep Nebraska a hidden treasure ;)
 
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Anyone know how one goes about getting their resident license and what the timeline is? NY state if that’s relevant.

Also what other little things do we need to do before starting? My PD hasn’t really sent me anything
 
Anyone know how one goes about getting their resident license and what the timeline is? NY state if that’s relevant.

Also what other little things do we need to do before starting? My PD hasn’t really sent me anything
idk about a resident license specifically but NY license usually takes a few months so I would apply soon so that you are good to go by end of June.
 
Program matched at: NYC 4 year
International Student (yes/no): no
NBME scores: 78%
Class Ranking/Size: 60/90
Externship(s)/where: 5 weeks all over country
Research: unrelated poster presentation
Extracurriculars: journal club president
Programs Applied to/Interview Invites/Interviews attended/Programs Ranked: 40/17/12/11

Anyone who thinks it's over for them don't give up! Matched straight out of school despite my nearly failing out of school d1 year. Couldn't be happier. Never expected this.
Can I message you with a question?
 
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Hello, everyone, I am a current OMS intern. The University of the Pacific has two 1-year non-categorical internship positions open for the 2024-2025 academic year for anyone interested.

The experiences and duties of the interns currently include, but continuously expand to enrich the program experiences:

University of the Pacific School of Dentistry
- Dentoalveolar surgery, with a strong emphasis on full mouth extractions, pre-prosthetic surgeries, E&B’s, 3rd molar with all types of impactions
- Benign and malignant pathology via weekly oral pathology clinic, steady referral base, with the interns doing a large majority of the biopsies
- Implantology with several OMS and prosthodontists, with a current expansion to All-on-X and zygomatic implants
- Sedations in newly renovated and expanding ambulatory Surgery Center (starting IV’s, pushing meds, perioperative management, becoming comfortable as an operator-anesthetist, intubation cases with our dental anesthesiologist)
- Teaching rotating dental students in between your columns of patients

California Pacific Medical Center
- Responsible for rounding and managing inpatients at 3 campuses within San Francisco
- Trauma, infections, orthognathic surgery, benign and malignant pathology (both ablative and reconstruction), TMJ, nerve reconstruction
- The large majority of cases, you are first-assist, otherwise second-assist

Didactics:
- History of Physical Examination course
- Service meetings weekly
- Journal clubs monthly
- Orthognathic seminar monthly
- Implant conference weekly
- Other full scope OMS lectures
- Publishing requirement

Pay is a non-GME funded stipend equivalent to a PGY-1 stipend.

This internship is a relatively new program, with both interns this year getting 8+ interviews and matching to their #1 ranked programs. There is a strong emphasis on mentorship and preparing the interns for the match cycle, running the service smoothly independent of residents, and becoming future superstar residents.

Personal remarks: After externing at 6 programs and keeping in touch with many other interns and residents, I am extremely happy with the experiences I have been getting and for what is left to come. The internship scope is very broad, has a remarkable balance between clinical and didactic learning, and I have truly enjoyed working with all my attendings and cointern who I now consider family.

For more information, visit the program website:
Do they take dentists with International Dental degrees (US citizen) who have completed a 1 year GPR program?
 
One non-categorical position is currently open at JPS OMFS for anyone interested.

Website: OMFS | JPS Health Network

"We offer a true full-scope experience for those looking to match in a competitive oral and maxillofacial surgery residency training program. Our interns receive exposure to Dentoaveolar, head and neck trauma, head and neck cancer - including microvascular reconstructive surgery, orthognathic surgery and all its data-collection, diagnosis and treatment planning, Facial pain and of course operating room surgical experience.

The best way to describe what will be your clinical experience is to briefly outline a typical week for a John Peter Smith Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery intern.

  • Monday is IV sedation day, with noon grand rounds for orthognathic reconstructive surgery presentations; at which, the interns will present comprehensive orthognathic surgery work-ups.
  • Tuesday the OMFS clinic is dentoaveolar patients all day. We also are running a facial/oral lesion clinic, which is primarily skin cancer diagnosis and removal and follow-ups from cancer resection surgery from the previous weeks. Additionally, we are in the operating room all day, primarily for facial trauma.
  • Wednesday is extraction clinic in the morning and the afternoon is facial pain clinic, specifically for the diagnosis and management of facial pain/TMJ disorders. We are also in the operating room all day.
  • Thursday the OMFS clinic is dentoaveolar patients all day. Thursday is also our main OR time for cancer resection and reconstruction surgeries.
  • Friday is full mouth extraction/IV sedation clinic and pre-op work ups for the next week.
The department of oral and maxillofacial surgery covers all the facial trauma call for the hospital 24/7/365.

Our interns work alongside the 5th and 6th year oral and maxillofacial surgery residents from the UT-Southwestern/Parkland training program.

Our interns will have unrivaled support for their application to advanced training in oral & maxillofacial surgery. Including regular lectures, workshops and mock interviews to prepare them for the rigorous demands of application into an oral & maxillofacial surgery residency program."

JPS has a very successful match history for their non-cats with 5/5 matched for the past 2+ years.

You can contact program coordinator Cortney Moore for more information/for the application!
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 817-702-1324
 
Apologies for being incredibly late to post - selfishly have had little to nothing to do with SDN since Match wrapped up. However, after just now logging on and seeing a collection of notifications querying for updates on match results, I recall how much I anticipated and appreciated having any objective data available after match results were released each year I was going through the application process.

I have included the standar info below, feel free to reach out if you happen to have any follow up questions. I would be happy to help however I might

Program matched at: Southern 6 year
International Student (yes/no): no
CBSE scores: 220 (78) - only took once D2 year, which ended up being the last set of exams with old scoring system
Class Ranking/GPA: No rank, option to receive letter grades for D1/2 yrs then retroactively changed to P/F - unofficial GPA on transcript = 4.00
Externship(s)/where: 5x - UNC, UAB, Parkland, UF Health: Jacksonville, Univ. of Kentucky
Research: Project initiated and received IRB, but was still "in progress" at time of interview cycle
Extracurriculars: Exec leadership roles in school-sponsored volunteer clinic, cleft and craniofacial fundraiser events, ASDA chapter, engagement with all the classic OMFS clubs, and extensive involvement and assistance with home program's scheduled didactics and OR cases respectively
Programs Applied to/Interview Invites/Interviews attended/Programs Ranked: 16/14/11/10 - Matched with my #1

A running (yet by no means comprehensive) list of personal opinions on the whole process now with hindsight - take as you will:
  • CBSE is important, but please don't let yourself or certainly anyone else convince you that it is the end-all-be-all
    • A passing score is assuredly necessary
    • While aiming for higher scores is undoubtedly advantageous, it's crucial to be mindful of basic economic principles: time and energy are finite resources. It's essential to consider possible retake attempts within this framework—as investments.
    • Ask yourself whether the potential increase in points would significantly enhance your perceived competitiveness, or if investing that time would be better utilized in cultivating experiences, knowledge, and relationships within the specific specialty of OMFS.
    • I won't even attempt to throw out a meaningless goal score (any you will or have read are subjective, be mindful of this)
    • I would make the argument that where and especially HOW you extern in addition to the impressions you have on those you will be asking to write your LORs certainly hold equal, if not more, weight in your overall app as your CBSE score does (completely a subjective take based solely on personal opinion/experiences)
  • Every relationship is an interview, be your consistent self and treat others with respect while doing so.
    • No matter how far removed someone might seem from your desired specialty, never underestimate the influence another's impression of you can have on your success when shared among colleagues
  • Graciously accept any opportunities you're given either directly or indirectly to involve yourself in any capacity of OMFS (didactics or operatively)
    • "You can fake that you care, but you can't fake that you're there" - Show up on time. Embody humility. Genuinely exhibit an insatiable curiosity to take away all you might from each and every experience.
  • Be a good and earnest person - it's often more clear to others than you might realize when your actions and words don't align with your true intentions and motivations.
    • Virtute enim ipsa non tam multi praediti esse quam videri volunt ("Few are those who wish to be endowed with virtue rather than to seem so") - if what you are or wish to be doesn't agree with how you present yourself to seem in front of others you encounter along the way, something in the equation needs to change
*any and all grammatical errors/misspeakings are my own - apologies up front for any you might find. Good luck to you all!
 
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Apologies for being incredibly late to post - selfishly have had little to nothing to do with SDN since Match wrapped up. However, after just now logging on and seeing a collection of notifications querying for updates on match results, I recall how much I anticipated and appreciated having any objective data available after match results were released each year I was going through the application process.

I have included the standar info below, feel free to reach out if you happen to have any follow up questions. I would be happy to help however I might

Program matched at: Southern 6 year
International Student (yes/no): no
CBSE scores: 220 (78) - only took once D2 year, which ended up being the last set of exams with old scoring system
Class Ranking/GPA: No rank, option to receive letter grades for D1/2 yrs then retroactively changed to P/F - unofficial GPA on transcript = 4.00
Externship(s)/where: 5x - UNC, UAB, Parkland, UF Health: Jacksonville, Univ. of Kentucky
Research: Project initiated and received IRB, but was still "in progress" at time of interview cycle
Extracurriculars: Exec leadership roles in school-sponsored volunteer clinic, cleft and craniofacial fundraiser events, ASDA chapter, engagement with all the classic OMFS clubs, and extensive involvement and assistance with home program's scheduled didactics and OR cases respectively
Programs Applied to/Interview Invites/Interviews attended/Programs Ranked: 16/14/11/10 - Matched with my #1

A running (yet by no means comprehensive) list of personal opinions on the whole process now with hindsight - take as you will:
  • CBSE is important, but please don't let yourself or certainly anyone else convince you that it is the end-all-be-all
    • A passing score is assuredly necessary
    • While aiming for higher scores is undoubtedly advantageous, it's crucial to be mindful of basic economic principles: time and energy are finite resources. It's essential to consider possible retake attempts within this framework—as investments.
    • Ask yourself whether the potential increase in points would significantly enhance your perceived competitiveness, or if investing that time would be better utilized in cultivating experiences, knowledge, and relationships within the specific specialty of OMFS.
    • I won't even attempt to throw out a meaningless goal score (any you will or have read are subjective, be mindful of this)
    • I would make the argument that where and especially HOW you extern in addition to the impressions you have on those you will be asking to write your LORs certainly hold equal, if not more, weight in your overall app as your CBSE score does (completely a subjective take based solely on personal opinion/experiences)
  • Every relationship is an interview, be your consistent self and treat others with respect while doing so.
    • No matter how far removed someone might seem from your desired specialty, never underestimate the influence another's impression of you can have on your success when shared among colleagues
  • Graciously accept any opportunities you're given either directly or indirectly to involve yourself in any capacity of OMFS (didactics or operatively)
    • "You can fake that you care, but you can't fake that you're there" - Show up on time. Embody humility. Genuinely exhibit an insatiable curiosity to take away all you might from each and every experience.
  • Be a good and earnest person - it's often more clear to others than you might realize when your actions and words don't align with your true intentions and motivations.
    • Virtute enim ipsa non tam multi praediti esse quam videri volunt ("Few are those who wish to be endowed with virtue rather than to seem so") - if what you are or wish to be doesn't agree with how you present yourself to seem in front of others you encounter along the way, something in the equation needs to change
*any and all grammatical errors/misspeakings are my own - apologies up front for any you might find. Good luck to you all!
Bro bro… fake that you care… be a good person… haha
 
Non-Categorical Internship Position (Non-Categorical PGY-1) available at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

The TJUH OMFS program is an accredited 4-year and 6-year OMFS Program in Philadelphia, PA with four categorical positions each year (2 in each track). We are looking for hard-working, self-motivated individuals who are looking to build their CV for residency applications. All prospective applicants must be eligible for an unrestricted Pennsylvania Dental license, a DEA license, and should have their own form of transportation. We have 4 non-categorical positions each year.

Our scope covers almost everything an OMFS can do including head and neck oncologic and reconstructive surgery, management of benign and malignant pathology, microvascular reconstructive surgery, orthognathic surgery, management of facial trauma, dentoalveolar surgery, implant surgery, and TMJ surgery.

Non-categorical interns are treated the same as our categorical interns with identical responsibilities. Responsibilities include:
  • Coverage of our main hospital in Center City Philadelphia (Level 1 trauma) and our satellite hospital in Northeast Philadelphia (Jefferson Torresdale, Level 2)
  • Coverage of our outpatient clinics located in Center City, Torresdale, Navy Yard and Bryn Mawr (extractions, biopsies, pre-prosthetic surgery, sedations, OR pre/post-ops, hospital follow-ups, outpatient H&N procedures)
  • Involvement in OR cases in Center City, Northeast Philadelphia and occasionally Methodist Hospital (located in Center City). We operate every day of the week.
  • Rounding on inpatients and managing their care at our Center City and Northeast Philadelphia locations
  • Taking primary call (4-7x/month). Home-call (non-trauma and trauma). Trauma is split with ENT every other month. Call is only taken for Center City, not Methodist or our Northeast Philadelphia Hospital location.
  • Involvement in all TJUH OMFS didactic activities

This is a paid position with full benefits through TJUH. Additional information regarding salary or benefits may be found on the TJUH Resident Information page (Resident Salary, Benefits & Other Information).

We have continued to enhance our didactic curriculum which includes an oral pathology course, monthly journal clubs, weekly case presentations and weekly lectures from residents, faculty, and guest lecturers. This position is an excellent opportunity to prepare you if you are reapplying to the OMS match in 2025. You will be working daily and directly under the supervision of multiple oral surgeons and will directly participate in surgical cases.

If you are interested in this position, please contact our Program Coordinator Ms. Joanna Schultz @ [email protected]. You must be attending or have graduated from an accredited US or Canadian dental school (or an advanced placement program). If qualified, we will set up a Zoom interview with our Program Director in the coming days.

Thank you in advance for your interest in our program!

Feel free to DM me with any questions!
 
Hi Everyone,

Our GPR program at Columbia/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital has one spot left for a resident to start July 1st. The position essentials acts as OS non-categorical spots taking OS call and being heavily involved with the OMFS team including the OR and in the clinic. Call is usually q7. Great opportunity for someone thinking about OMS but still wants a little exposure to general dentistry or someone who applied to OMS and did not get a spot this round looking for a non-cat spot.

In recent history we've had excellent success in matching our GPRs to OMFS programs if that's what they're interested in.

Please DM this account if interested.
 
Harlem Hospital Center Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery has openings for 2 non-categorical intern positions to start July 1, 2024.

The Harlem Hospital OMFS program is an accredited 4-year OMFS Program in Harlem, New York. We practice full scope OMS and offer our residents the opportunity to serve patients in an exciting, fast-paced, and highly diverse environment. Harlem Hospital is a busy Level 2 trauma center that still accepts the majority of level one traumas in the area. The service covers facial trauma of the hospital 24/7/365. The program has a history of matching its own non-categorical interns, and an overall very high match rate for residents in the last 4 years. We participate in the Match and offer 1 categorical position each year. We are looking for hard-working, self-motivated individuals to join our team this upcoming 2024-2025 year.


The Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Harlem Hospital Center will offer 2 non-categorical intern positions starting July 1st 2024

Please note: Eligible candidates must have completed a 1-year residency with valid certificate or have / be eligible to obtain a valid NY state dental license prior to starting.
(see NYS Dentistry:License Requirements)



Primary responsibilities will include the following:

1. Dentoalveolar surgery in a busy outpatient setting

2. Participation in the call schedule, responding to consults for maxillofacial trauma, orofacial infections, and additional emergent conditions

3. Pre-/peri-/post-operative management in the inpatient setting



Educational opportunities provided by the internship program will include:

1) Weekly didactic lectures and journal club covering the full scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery

2) Participation in weekly Grand Rounds

3) History and Physical Examination course

4) Exposure to the management of oral and maxillofacial surgery disease and deformities in the operating room setting



Interns will receive the salary and benefits at the PGY 2 level.

If interested in applying for the position, please email the program director Dr. James R. King ([email protected]) with your CV or PASS application. Feel free to private message me for any questions!


Harlem Hospital Center Department of Dentistry also has openings for 5 General Practice Residency (GPR) positions to start July 1, 2024.

The Harlem Hospital GPR program is an accredited 1year GPR Program in Harlem, New York. We practice full scope dentistry, encompass all subspecialties and offer our residents the opportunity to serve patients in an exciting, fast-paced, and highly diverse environment. The program has a history of residents matching at different subspecialties including OMFS, pediatric dentistry and endodontics its own non-categorical interns. We participate in the Match. We are looking for hard-working, self-motivated individuals to join our team this upcoming 2024-2025 year.


The Department of Dentistry at Harlem Hospital Center will offer 5 GPR positions starting July 1st 2024




Primary responsibilities will include the following:

1. Full scope dentistry including Endo, Prosth, OS, Perio in a very busy outpatient setting

2. Participation in the call schedule with OMFS

3. Anesthesia and Emergency room rotations



Educational opportunities provided by the internship program will include:

1) Weekly didactic lectures covering the full scope of dentistry and management of patients

2) Participation in weekly Grand Rounds

3) Oral pathology lecture series





Residents will receive the salary and benefits at the PGY 1 level in New York State.

If interested in applying for the position, please email the program director Dr. James R. King ([email protected]) with your CV or PASS application.
 
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Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Internship Opportunity for July 1, 2024 - June 30, 2025

LSU OMFS offers a comprehensive oral and maxillofacial surgery experience

1 Non-Categorical PGY-1 paid position available in hospital-based OMFS department.

***There will be 1 month of dedicated CBSE study time without any clinical or hospital responsibilities***

Requirements: Graduation from CODA-accredited Dental School

The Oral & Maxillofacial surgery department at Louisiana State University in New Orleans has non-categorical intern positions available for the 2024-2025 year. We are looking for dedicated OMFS applicants eager to gain diverse experience in the field of OMFS. Our scope includes malignant pathology, microvascular reconstruction, orthognathic surgery, trauma surgery, temporomandibular joint surgery, benign pathology, dentoalveolar/sedations, and cosmetic cases. Interns cover clinics at University Medical Center and LSU School of Dentistry in New Orleans as well as our site in Baton Rouge. Here at LSU we work to build a culture collegiality to foster a team-centered environment. We've designed an experience that will facilitate a smooth transition into residency for all of our non-categorical interns.

Requirements for application: Please contact Dr. Hisham Hatoum for further information on the application process and internship experience.


Internship Director

Dr. Hisham Hatoum
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 443-421-5745

Program Coordinator
Jessica Helgeson
Phone: 704-355-1467
email: [email protected]

Program Director/Department Chair
Dr. Jeff James
Email: [email protected]
 
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Possible open Non-Cat position in Southern California!!!! DM for details
 
How many programs still have open noncats? Seems that applicants are trending to not wanting to do them. (Only asking mainly because I have a noncat lined up but wanted to know the atmosphere on noncats)
 
How many programs still have open noncats? Seems that applicants are trending to not wanting to do them. (Only asking mainly because I have a noncat lined up but wanted to know the atmosphere on noncats)
I don’t know about numbers, but if you didn’t match and don’t do a non-cat then It seems like your chances of matching next cycle are very very low.

And yeah it makes sense why people don’t want to do them. You could realistically go work making $170k for a year working decent hours, maybe retake the CBSE and have a good amount of time to study. Instead you have to work long hours, making $40-60k. Just to have to do a second intern year if you match. Some places pay you a fair amount less than the categorical interns even though you’re doing the same work.
 
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How many programs still have open noncats? Seems that applicants are trending to not wanting to do them. (Only asking mainly because I have a noncat lined up but wanted to know the atmosphere on noncats)
If you want what most can’t have you have to do what most won’t do
 
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I asked a while back, but I just wanted to verify. For those who applied last year and received interviews/matched, did you apply to both 4 & 6 year programs if the same program offered both? I am indifferent between the two tracks, and there are several programs that offer both tracks. I just want to know that I won't be shooting myself in the foot if I apply to both at the same program. I know that there is an increased cost since they are counted as separate applications.
 
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I asked a while back, but I just wanted to verify. For those who applied last year and received interviews/matched, did you apply to both 4 & 6 year programs if the same program offered both? I am indifferent between the two tracks, and there are several programs that offer both tracks. I just want to know that I won't be shooting myself in the foot if I apply to both at the same program. I know that there is an increased cost since they are counted as separate applications.
I have the same question. Following.
 
I asked a while back, but I just wanted to verify. For those who applied last year and received interviews/matched, did you apply to both 4 & 6 year programs if the same program offered both? I am indifferent between the two tracks, and there are several programs that offer both tracks. I just want to know that I won't be shooting myself in the foot if I apply to both at the same program. I know that there is an increased cost since they are counted as separate applications.
You're not shooting yourself in the foot. If the program likes you, generally you can only interview for one of them, so they'll either ask you at that point which you want to interview for, or they'll just pick you to interview for one of them. Generally you wouldn't be able to interview for both tracks from my experience on the trail.
 
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