DVMDream

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I have to agree that is a terrible idea. I can see lots of ear infections and eye problems occuring from this. As well as if someone accidently bumps up the temperature of the water or the thermostat that regulates the temperature breaks pets could easily get burned in it. Very, very bad idea. Just take the effort to bathe your pet it is much safer.
 

luplodw

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I'm sure it's not easy for them to breathe when water is being sprayed in their face....this is the stupidest idea ever. People need to stop being lazy
 
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I would call some of those animals stressed out. "Spa" indicates a different situation completely. Some didn't look like they could breathe easily either. And is there anything to actually scrub the dirt out or are they just misting these animals off?

How lazy. What a terrible idea.
 

variegata

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You can totally see "Oliver" flailing and struggling to get out of that thing. Stress-free? Yeah, right.
 

Electrophile

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I love Oliver's owner. "They call it a spa. Can't be that bad." Bathing a baby can be unpleasant. Oh, I know! :idea: Let's come up with a "Baby Spa" and put a 6 month old infant in there, see how they do! Then run across the street for a cup of coffee like it suggests! ****ing morons.
 

Sharpei5

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...... Idiot
this guy doesn't care about animals, he's in it for the $
 

heylodeb

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health risks aside - the animals look absolutely terrified!! gag. makes me angry :mad:
 

racccjlm

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:thumbdown: Not ok. It doesn't matter if the water and air temperature are computer controlled if the dogs can't breathe. IMO, that would be terrifying.
 

zeebra44

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Did anyone else catch the lady say, "You know all those stories, don't put your kids in the washer!" Sorry, but I died laughing. If you wouldn't put your kids in the washer, why would it be safe to put your pets in the washer? These poor animals look terrified, and soap to the eyes probably doesn't feel very good. People are so damn lazy. Shut this place down, IMO.
 

BlacKAT33

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OMG i'm speechless. This seriously looks like a torture chamber. They could at least make the area bigger like a full shower, or a place for the dogs head to come out. sighhh...now I will start the day off angry :mad:
 
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OMG i'm speechless. This seriously looks like a torture chamber. They could at least make the area bigger like a full shower, or a place for the dogs head to come out. sighhh...now I will start the day off angry :mad:
Ditto. I had no idea what would be at the other end of that link, but seriously? The PetSpa is terrible.

Since we're on the topic of bathing, do any SDNer's know of an easy way to connect/adapt simple tubing to their shower faucet for easier dog bathing? (And by simple tubing, I mean something that does not involve a soap dispensing head... just a good-old-fashioned hose. I like to do "the soap part" myself.)
 
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I think this is hilarious... can't people just wash their animals or pay a person to do it... It just seems so stupid!
 

Polar Opposite

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I'm pretty confident in saying that Oliver didn't look like he thought he was at the spa...apparently something called a spa can be "that bad"...
 

der2002

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utterly traumatic.

also, not to sound too weird, but I really like washing my dogs. in the shower. with me. am I the only one?
 

Electrophile

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Since we're on the topic of bathing, do any SDNer's know of an easy way to connect/adapt simple tubing to their shower faucet for easier dog bathing? (And by simple tubing, I mean something that does not involve a soap dispensing head... just a good-old-fashioned hose. I like to do "the soap part" myself.)
I would just get a detachable shower head. I've got four dogs and occasional fosters and it's invaluable, even though I don't typically bathe my own dogs with soap more than once or twice a year. Though I just started herding lessons with my Malinois and he's been getting really dirty in the mud, so it may be helpful for just giving him a good spray down. A basic one just costs like $20ish or so and they only take a few minutes to set up.
 

BlacKAT33

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I couldn't watch the whole video since i'm at work, but I assume this is really going on..and people are paying to do this to their dog. Is there any way to protect these animals? Doesn't this spa have to pass some type rules, can ACUC be involved? How are pet day care and spa places regulated???
 

DVMDream

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utterly traumatic.

also, not to sound too weird, but I really like washing my dogs. in the shower. with me. am I the only one?
I do not do this. Only because I do not want the one dog in the shower while I am in there because she rolls in the dirt a lot and the water turns a dark brownish black color when washing her. I have to wash my other dog outside because he refuses to let anyone pick him up (except the groomer). He is a 50 pound border collie mix and can move really fast despite being 12 years old. He hates to be picked up and will instantly roll onto his back if you try to pick him up. So he gets his bath outside.
 

der2002

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actually, you could say I wash my dogs with me from a totally practical standpoint: I'm going to get wet anyway. They don't love the experience, but seem to put up with it ok. It took a while, though, before I could get them comfortable with the running water, the shower door, etc. (lots of exposure and peanut butter helped). Now, I don't even have to carry my big dog-- he'll walk right in!

For really muddy/dirty dogs, I would definitely wash them outside too...

As for my cats, they seem to do a pretty good job of cleaning themselves :p
 

Medic_9

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I didn't watch the video because I have already seen it or one like it. The one I saw had a japanese woman talking and someone else translating. Near the end of it she says that she knows it's comfortable because she personally tried it and found it to be relaxing...
 

Electrophile

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Maybe it could be "relaxing" if it was just warm water, but how do you prevent soap in your eyes or up the nose? Plus to rinse, you need a pretty good stream of water going to get a thorough rinse. I really doubt it's relaxing to the pet.
 

BlacKAT33

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I couldn't watch the whole video since i'm at work, but I assume this is really going on..and people are paying to do this to their dog. Is there any way to protect these animals? Doesn't this spa have to pass some type rules, can ACUC be involved? How are pet day care and spa places regulated???
I'm quoting my own text. Does anyone know? Now i'm really curious about if this kind of stuff is regulated at all.
 

DVMDream

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I'm quoting my own text. Does anyone know? Now i'm really curious about if this kind of stuff is regulated at all.
I honestly do not know if/how they are regualted and I am just as curious as you are to find out. You would think that there should be some sort of regulation. I am also curious as to if there are any regulations for pet boarding facilites?
 

zeebra44

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How do you prevent the spread of disease in these things? It seems pretty germ-laden to me..even with soap and hot water. I picture wet dog..warm water..and microbes..bleeeeh :(
 

Allthingsequine

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And besides all of the issues with safety and comfort of the poor animals, I don't see how these things could be effective at all! My mom is a professional groomer and there is definitely a lot more involved in her bathing a dog than just spraying it down with water. Maybe this kind of device could kind of work on a very short coated dog, but I don't see any way the water could even penetrate to the skin on a long haired or double coated breed, let alone get the coat thoroughly scrubbed, dematted, and undercoat stripped if necessary. They mention in the video how it is less expensive than having a groomer wash the dog- well, you definitely get what you pay for!
 

Poochlover11

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Oh my gosh!! That WAS like a torture chamber! All you could see were their paws sliding down the glass in desperation as they disappeared into a stream of water!! And that poor cat was trying frantically to get out!! Horrible :thumbdown:

And I agree with others-I took two pet grooming classes and it is way more intensive then then just throwing them into a pet car wash! We would start wetting them from the head and then work down to the rest of the body in case they had fleas. We also cleaned ears, expressed anal glands and thoroughly washed out all the soap (cause if it isn't all washed out it can really irritate the skin)! I cannot imagine pets getting their coats thoroughly cleaned-especially with dogs that have long hair and thick coats.

This is just pure laziness I say!! :annoyed:
 

Polar Opposite

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BlacKAT33

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Did you see what the poster of that video wrote as the description?
"The fun of watching kitties getting washed." :mad::mad::mad:
 

HopefulAg

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Can't cats easily die from getting too worked up? I'd never seen it happen but the vet always cautioned me when washing a cat, that if they get much worked up at all to just stop the bath because they can get so worked up that their heart explodes. Seems like that 'spa' would be a prime place for such an occurrence.

Then run across the street for a cup of coffee like it suggests!
No kidding. The whole video was rather unsettling but I was aghast at that comment. It makes you envision a laundromat style with a Starbucks right across the street. "Pop in your pet and go enjoy a mochachino while you wait!" ****ing morons indeed.
 

lalzi22

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Can't cats easily die from getting too worked up? I'd never seen it happen but the vet always cautioned me when washing a cat, that if they get much worked up at all to just stop the bath because they can get so worked up that their heart explodes.
THIS HAPPENED TO ME!!! I was shaving the mats out of a cats back (the cat was actually just one giant mat, but I digress...) and it was FREAKING out and then...died. Just freaking DIED. Heart stopped. The vet RAN IN and gave it atropine and epinephrine and was doing kitty CPR. Thank GOD it survived, but after that we called the owners and were like "Um...clipping your cat? Not gonna happen". Whew. So scary.
 
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Seriously that is infuriating! It's all well and good that those people say "oh yeah it's so safe and not stressful at all, I did it too!" because a PERSON would obviously KNOW they were going to have a bunch of water sprayed in their faces! We can't tell a dog or cat "okay, now don't panic, just ignore the random bursts of water spraying into your eyes, nose, and mouth!"...seriously! I would like to go grab every one of those people when they least expect it and just spray them with soap and water out of the blue! I'd like to see them call THAT relaxing! They would be FREAKING OUT!!!...ugh...people amaze me sometimes. :mad::mad:
 

DVMDream

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Vet Engineer

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It must be safe! It was designed by veterinary behaviorists and engineers! They must have recruited some behaviorists who had waaaaaay too much left in vet school loans and no morals to endorse this thing.

Any owner willing to put their cat in that machine should be waterboarded for a few days. Then maybe they'll understand what their cats are feeling. I wonder if they are ever bitten trying to take dogs or cats out of the machine after they are done and thoroughly freaked out.
 

CanadianGolden

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If you feel strongly about this, please write the company (and the stores that use this) as I did and point out the issues with this device.
 

BlacKAT33

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If you feel strongly about this, please write the company (and the stores that use this) as I did and point out the issues with this device.
Not only will i do that, im going to try and find out about these regulations! seems like no one on SDN knows. i will talk with the vet on ACUC and see what could possibly be done about it. i cant believe they're getting away with this.
 

CanadianGolden

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I could be wrong, but I thought IUCAC only applied to animals used for research. You might want to talk to the AHA.
 

BlacKAT33

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I could be wrong, but I thought IUCAC only applied to animals used for research. You might want to talk to the AHA.
yea, but thats just the closest thing i know to ask about how these places are regulated, if at all. I'll try AHA too, hopefully they respond.
 

luplodw

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I think it might be ok if the animals had some place to put their head so it wouldnt get sprayed...but still even if they had that, I dont think the animals would keep their heads in it and I still think they'd freak out. I find myself watching this video over and over because I think its so horrible
 

sumstorm

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And besides all of the issues with safety and comfort of the poor animals, I don't see how these things could be effective at all! My mom is a professional groomer and there is definitely a lot more involved in her bathing a dog than just spraying it down with water. Maybe this kind of device could kind of work on a very short coated dog, but I don't see any way the water could even penetrate to the skin on a long haired or double coated breed, let alone get the coat thoroughly scrubbed, dematted, and undercoat stripped if necessary. They mention in the video how it is less expensive than having a groomer wash the dog- well, you definitely get what you pay for!
I thought the same thing! It might do the trick on my JRT, but my coated shepherd or cocker? no way a spray down would get them clean. As for torture, I know my shepherd would think it was fun....anything with water is a joy to her, 4 of my other dogs wouldn't care (they have suffered worse), and one would freak out (just as he does for regular baths.) I bath my dogs in an extra-large stand up shower (I don't like the enclosed tub in this house, and our other house has jacuzzi tubs that aren't really great for bathing dogs) and I doubt the experience is much different (lots of water coming down from above) but I would definitly be concerned that people wouldn't know their pets well enough to know if this stressed them out....or to be wise enough to realize that some dogs couldn't take enclosed heat like that. And I would worry about sanitation. I can honestly say that I don't think it is much worse than some of the poorer groomers that I have observed (and when I find a great groomer, I spread the word, use them all the time, and tip well, but I don't find great groomers all that often.) I do think a good, thorough bath takers a lot more skill and effort than a machine can handle.
 

sumstorm

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It must be safe! It was designed by veterinary behaviorists and engineers! They must have recruited some behaviorists who had waaaaaay too much left in vet school loans and no morals to endorse this thing.
Remember, there is a big difference between animal behaviorist, veterinarian, and veterinary behaviorist. anyone can call themselves an animal behaviorist. The film clip said 'animal behaviorist and veterinarians', not veterinary behaviorists (of which there are less than 60 world wide.) I know at least half of them and can't imagine any of them endorsing such a thing...while I know enough vets that think steroids cure everything and animal behaviorists that still recommend techniques like helicoptoring. Just clarifying.
 

BlacKAT33

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Remember, there is a big difference between animal behaviorist, veterinarian, and veterinary behaviorist. anyone can call themselves an animal behaviorist. The film clip said 'animal behaviorist and veterinarians', not veterinary behaviorists (of which there are less than 60 world wide.) I know at least half of them and can't imagine any of them endorsing such a thing...while I know enough vets that think steroids cure everything and animal behaviorists that still recommend techniques like helicoptoring. Just clarifying.
whats helicoptoring :confused:
 

CanadianGolden

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Spinning a dog around on the end of a leash--ie pulling its front or all legs off the ground and turning so the dog is pushed out to the end of the leash by centripetal/reactive centrifugal force.