2023-2024 Emory

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chilly_md

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2023-2024 Emory Secondary Prompts

All have 200 word limits.

1. List your entire curriculum plan for the 2023-2024 academic year. If you are not in school, please briefly describe your plans for the coming year.

2. Briefly describe your health-related experiences. Be sure to include important experiences that are in your AMCAS application, as well as any recent experiences.

3. Briefly describe your interest in Emory and the Emory degree program you have selected.

4. Emory School of Medicine is committed to recruiting and educating medical students who will help deliver quality health care and will promote the health of our patients. In our community, this includes learning about and addressing the health care needs of our most under-served populations. Please describe any of your activities that have been in service to under-served communities.

5. If you have any updates or new information to report since you have submitted your AMCAS primary application, please briefly describe below.


Good luck to everyone applying!

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For secondary prompt #5 "If you have any updates or new information to report since you have submitted your AMCAS primary application, please briefly describe below. (200 word max)"- I'm an international student. However, my husband (American citizen) has filled for my green card (permanent residency). Would that be a good thing to include here?
 
For secondary prompt #5 "If you have any updates or new information to report since you have submitted your AMCAS primary application, please briefly describe below. (200 word max)"- I'm an international student. However, my husband (American citizen) has filled for my green card (permanent residency). Would that be a good thing to include here?
It sounds like a good place to put this kind of update.
You don't have to include your estimate of when the green card might come into effect for you, but do you know for yourself when it might happen?
 
It sounds like a good place to put this kind of update.
You don't have to include your estimate of when the green card might come into effect for you, but do you know for yourself when it might happen?
At first, my lawyer said it would take ~1 year. However, after closely looking at my case, he believes it will be faster than that, estimating something between 6-8 months.
 
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Was planning on applying to Emory, but after looking at this website showing that 83% of their class is non-traditional, it wouldn't be pragmatic to apply there as a traditional student. Any thoughts?
 
Was planning on applying to Emory, but after looking at this website showing that 83% of their class is non-traditional, it wouldn't be pragmatic to apply there as a traditional student. Any thoughts?
I bet it's due to so many MD/PhD's applicants who took a gap year to do research
But 70% female too :wut:
 
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I bet it's due to so many MD/PhD's applicants who took a gap year to do research
But 70% female too :wut:
Wait so taking a gap year is enough to be non-trad? With so many people taking one nowadays I thought it now meant taking a much longer, windier path to med school
 
Wait so taking a gap year is enough to be non-trad? With so many people taking one nowadays I thought it now meant taking a much longer, windier path to med school
The school may be specifically defining it that way when creating that class profile graphic. Non-trad in general does typically mean career changer or someone who has at least a couple years in between their undergrad and when they are applying to medical school.
 
Wait so taking a gap year is enough to be non-trad? With so many people taking one nowadays I thought it now meant taking a much longer, windier path to med school
I don’t quite understand Emory’s definition of “non-trad”, but I can confirm that the majority of my classmates have taken at least one gap year. There’s a few that are coming straight in, but the vast majority are gap year takers and a few career changers. Hope that helps :)
 
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I'm OOS but have close family in Atlanta and would love to be near them. Is there a way I can signal this? It seems like Emory prefers non-trad students so anything to show why I'm interested is of interest to me!
 
I'm OOS but have close family in Atlanta and would love to be near them. Is there a way I can signal this? It seems like Emory prefers non-trad students so anything to show why I'm interested is of interest to me!
They have a "why Emory" type esssay.
 
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For Emory's three individual letters of recommendation, if I already have two letters from professors who taught me in hard sciences, would it be better for my third LOR to be a research letter from my PI or a clinical letter from a physician who I worked full time with for over a year and knows me very well?
 
For Emory's three individual letters of recommendation, if I already have two letters from professors who taught me in hard sciences, would it be better for my third LOR to be a research letter from my PI or a clinical letter from a physician who I worked full time with for over a year and knows me very well?
I also had this question and the consensus was to choose whichever letter is stronger
 
For Emory's three individual letters of recommendation, if I already have two letters from professors who taught me in hard sciences, would it be better for my third LOR to be a research letter from my PI or a clinical letter from a physician who I worked full time with for over a year and knows me very well?
tbh Emory values clinical experience over research
 
If they keep the prompt "Briefly describe your health-related experiences. Be sure to include important experiences that are in your AMCAS application, as well as any recent experiences. (200 words)", do they really want a whistle-stop tour on ALL healthcare experiences in the AMCAS app? 10/15 of my experiences were health-related, so I'd only have about a sentence for each given the 200-word limit.

Or would it be acceptable to choose 1-2 health-related experiences and provide in-depth detail on what I learned, and how I grew as an individual?
 
If they keep the prompt "Briefly describe your health-related experiences. Be sure to include important experiences that are in your AMCAS application, as well as any recent experiences. (200 words)", do they really want a whistle-stop tour on ALL healthcare experiences in the AMCAS app? 10/15 of my experiences were health-related, so I'd only have about a sentence for each given the 200-word limit.

Or would it be acceptable to choose 1-2 health-related experiences and provide in-depth detail on what I learned, and how I grew as an individual?
Let's wait & see what the prompts will be this year!
 
Pretty subjective question, but is it worth it to apply here as an IS with an LM of 69? I am not sure if Emory is a more holistic school or weighs stats higher.
 
Pretty subjective question, but is it worth it to apply here as an IS with an LM of 69? I am not sure if Emory is a more holistic school or weighs stats higher.
From what you shared in your WAMC post, it would not be worth it in my opinion.
 
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Non-Trad Applicant (2021 Engineering grad) needing LoR advice

I have 4 individual letters from which to choose: science prof (physics), engineering prof, shadowed physician, and physician I've worked as an MA for a year. If I submit, I'd include the physics letter and clinical letter but am unsure about the other two. I obviously haven't read them but suspect them to be equally strong - just from different perspectives. Does anyone have insight into what Emory may value more?

Also, given the 2 hard science LoRs 'requirement', is it even worth applying, especially since apparently physics is no longer a 'hard science'?
 
Non-Trad Applicant (2021 Engineering grad) needing LoR advice

I have 4 individual letters from which to choose: science prof (physics), engineering prof, shadowed physician, and physician I've worked as an MA for a year. If I submit, I'd include the physics letter and clinical letter but am unsure about the other two. I obviously haven't read them but suspect them to be equally strong - just from different perspectives. Does anyone have insight into what Emory may value more?

Also, given the 2 hard science LoRs 'requirement', is it even worth applying, especially since apparently physics is no longer a 'hard science'?
Leave off the physician you shadowed
 
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Non-Trad Applicant (2021 Engineering grad) needing LoR advice

I have 4 individual letters from which to choose: science prof (physics), engineering prof, shadowed physician, and physician I've worked as an MA for a year. If I submit, I'd include the physics letter and clinical letter but am unsure about the other two. I obviously haven't read them but suspect them to be equally strong - just from different perspectives. Does anyone have insight into what Emory may value more?

Also, given the 2 hard science LoRs 'requirement', is it even worth applying, especially since apparently physics is no longer a 'hard science'?
Shadowing letters are of no value for MD programs.

Physics should count as a hard science. I would be very surprised if it did not. Engineering is where it may get a little muddled.
 
Shadowing letters are of no value for MD programs.

Physics should count as a hard science. I would be very surprised if it did not. Engineering is where it may get a little muddled.
Emory states biology, chemistry, and physical earth science (???) as the hard sciences. They do specifically indicate engineering is not a hard science - but I have no other option, which is why I'm asking whether a physics, engineering (I'd think this one to be certainly stronger than my physics letter), and clinical LoR would be worth trying.

They indicate 2 science letters as a requirement but then also immediately say it's ultimately up to me as to who I believe who can advocate best on my behalf.
 
Emory states biology, chemistry, and physical earth science (???) as the hard sciences. They do specifically indicate engineering is not a hard science - but I have no other option, which is why I'm asking whether a physics, engineering (I'd think this one to be certainly stronger than my physics letter), and clinical LoR would be worth trying.

They indicate 2 science letters as a requirement but then also immediately say it's ultimately up to me as to who I believe who can advocate best on my behalf.
I'm using my biomedical engineering professor as a science letter for a bunch of schools—if you're also BME or ChemE I think you have the wiggle room to make it work because of the bio / chem component.
 
I'm using my biomedical engineering professor as a science letter for a bunch of schools—if you're also BME or ChemE I think you have the wiggle room to make it work because of the bio / chem component.
My engineering (mechanical) letter is a heat transfer prof, essentially thermo 3 and an extension into what is generally covered in a portion of physics 1. Unfortunately, I doubt content will be considered as overlapping.
 
Emory states biology, chemistry, and physical earth science (???) as the hard sciences. They do specifically indicate engineering is not a hard science - but I have no other option, which is why I'm asking whether a physics, engineering (I'd think this one to be certainly stronger than my physics letter), and clinical LoR would be worth trying.

They indicate 2 science letters as a requirement but then also immediately say it's ultimately up to me as to who I believe who can advocate best on my behalf.
Please see their website as they seem to have clearly stated they will accept physics and that they are flexible in the requirements:

 
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any regular admissions receive a secondary?
 
Nothing here
 
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I still have not heard anything or received a secondary yet.
 
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what are you referring to?
Ah MSAR lists earliest notification of acceptance is Oct 15th. I was thinking since secondaries are being sent out so late this year, the timeline for hearing about acceptances/rejections will be pushed back. But I've heard a few schools that make decisions weekly so I guess it differs.
 
damn is there still hope for oct 15th decisions?
(as someone with no experience on an adcom) i imagine if anything is affected it will be the number of decisions (i.e. they may not be able to review as many apps as normal by oct 15), but they will probably still be able to send out some A’s and R’s they feel certain about
 
Ah MSAR lists earliest notification of acceptance is Oct 15th. I was thinking since secondaries are being sent out so late this year, the timeline for hearing about acceptances/rejections will be pushed back. But I've heard a few schools that make decisions weekly so I guess it differs.
Secondaries are not late. The med schools just received your primaries less than 3 weeks ago.
Work on the ones you have, nobody is "beating you" to submitting Emory's secondary.
The first date for possible offers of admission is still October 15 at AMCAS and TMDSAS schools, but not all schools send out offers that early.
 
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Haven't heard anything on my end. I'm OOS RD.
 
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Is the reason Emory SOM isn’t sending secondaries because it’s closing down and shutting its door for good? RIP Emory med 🩷 :(
 
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