2023-2024 Massachusetts

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Anyone suprised with their decision?

I believe that I was a very strong applicant. 52X MCAT, high GPA, very strong ECs, LORs, high preview, excellent writing, and good interview skills.

I had an excellent cycle and got a lot of love from a lot of schools.

But, UMass is my state school. At the start of the cycle I told myself that even if I strike out everywhere else, I can count on UMass to have my back. Boy was I wrong.

I am honestly suprised that I didn't get into my state school as a resident of this state who was born here and never left. The same is true for a lot of other strong applicants that got rejected.

I do know several other residents who blatantly had much weaker applications. They all got in. The common denominator for the 4 applicants I know who got it is that their fathers are all physicians. I find that really interesting.
I’m not surprised now as in I didn’t expect them to roll out A’s on 4/29, but before the cycle I thought I had a very strong chance as an in-state resident whose application eventually ended up receiving success at other “higher ranked” schools.

That being said, every school’s selection criteria is different and UMass is known not to value stats a ton (based on what their current admissions Dean said on a podcast), and stats were a big factor that I at least relied on to pull me through. Some schools may also weight the interview heavily, and for me, I thought my interview was extremely meh. I would be extremely surprised if parental occupation at all factored in especially since even the physician parents of admits are probably not affiliated with UMass and I don’t see it bringing the institution a ton of value to use that as a selection criterion.

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Post-II R. Interviewed in Nov

For future threads, it seems like if you don’t hear back within a reasonable time then you’re just destined for the R on the last possible day
 
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Post-II OOS MD/PhD R.

This comes 167 days after my interview (about 5.5 months), which was offered to me 4 days after I was pre-II rejected. It's been a wild ride.
 
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I’m not surprised now as in I didn’t expect them to roll out A’s on 4/29, but before the cycle I thought I had a very strong chance as an in-state resident whose application eventually ended up receiving success at other “higher ranked” schools.

That being said, every school’s selection criteria is different and UMass is known not to value stats a ton (based on what their current admissions Dean said on a podcast), and stats were a big factor that I at least relied on to pull me through. Some schools may also weight the interview heavily, and for me, I thought my interview was extremely meh. I would be extremely surprised if parental occupation at all factored in especially since even the physician parents of admits are probably not affiliated with UMass and I don’t see it bringing the institution a ton of value to use that as a selection criterion.
Well I wouldn't be suprised at all.
 
Post ii R, 216 days after my interview. I thought I was a perfect fit for this school and my interviewers told me so as well.

To future applicants reading this, let the examples today serve as a indicator of what you're getting yourself into by applying (and interviewing) here. But also keep in mind that fortunately many of us ended up at institutions that treated us much better throughout this process. If that happens to be UMass for you, then great. If not, it'll work out.

I will say now that I have nothing to lose I am going to submit a complaint to their handling of our applications, because it seems like my experience is not unique by any means
 
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Post ii R, 216 days after my interview. I thought I was a perfect fit for this school and my interviewers told me so as well.

To future applicants reading this, let the examples today serve as a indicator of what you're getting yourself into by applying (and interviewing) here. But also keep in mind that fortunately many of us ended up at institutions that treated us much better throughout this process. If that happens to be UMass for you, then great. If not, it'll work out.

I will say now that I have nothing to lose I am going to submit a complaint to their handling of our applications, because it seems like my experience is not unique by any means
I was debating on tearing them up, but I do plan on applying here for some residency programs. Be careful not to burn any bridges. The best we can do is warn future applicants. This place is a joke and the people continuing to defend them need to grow a spine.
 
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I’m not surprised now as in I didn’t expect them to roll out A’s on 4/29, but before the cycle I thought I had a very strong chance as an in-state resident whose application eventually ended up receiving success at other “higher ranked” schools.

That being said, every school’s selection criteria is different and UMass is known not to value stats a ton (based on what their current admissions Dean said on a podcast), and stats were a big factor that I at least relied on to pull me through. Some schools may also weight the interview heavily, and for me, I thought my interview was extremely meh. I would be extremely surprised if parental occupation at all factored in especially since even the physician parents of admits are probably not affiliated with UMass and I don’t see it bringing the institution a ton of value to use that as a selection criterion.
Do you have a better explanation as to why me and a lot of my buddies who are 520+ scorers and excellent all around applicants struck out at this school, while a handful of our peers, who have physician parents, with sub 510 MCATs and near zero ECs had so much luck? They only got into UMass, no other schools, while those of us who were rejected got into to tons of other schools. I struggle to find a reason other than them being the child of a physician. But I'm open to listen to your reasons as to how this could happen. Year after year btw, same thing happened last year with a lot of strong applicants that I personally know.
 
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As someone who was accepted at "higher ranked" medical schools than UMass, I'm really peeved with how they handled their admissions process. I, like many others in this thread, am an IS applicant who was counting on UMass for reduced tuition. It seems like they handed out way, way too many IIs and couldn't sort through them all in a reasonable time. I hope they realize that it feels much more disrespectful to receive an II and have to wait this long rather than not receiving an II at all. I really feel for the applicants who had to wait forever to know whether they were going to medical school or had to undergo a difficult reapplication process. It sucked having to tell people for so long that I didn't know WHERE I was going to medical school, I can't imagine having to tell people I still didn't know IF I was going to medical school.

Highly unprofessional on UMass to make applicants wait this long, especially because of how many IS applicants they were stringing along. I certainly won't be forgetting this experience any time soon.
 
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As someone who was accepted at "higher ranked" medical schools than UMass, I'm really peeved with how they handled their admissions process. I, like many others in this thread, am an IS applicant who was counting on UMass for reduced tuition. It seems like they handed out way, way too many IIs and couldn't sort through them all in a reasonable time. I hope they realize that it feels much more disrespectful to receive an II and have to wait this long rather than not receiving an II at all. I really feel for the applicants who had to wait forever to know whether they were going to medical school or had to undergo a difficult reapplication process. It sucked having to tell people for so long that I didn't know WHERE I was going to medical school, I can't imagine having to tell people I still didn't know IF I was going to medical school.

Highly unprofessional on UMass to make applicants wait this long, especially because of how many IS applicants they were stringing along. I certainly won't be forgetting this experience any time soon.

Maybe they felt that you were overqualified, compared to the pool of applicants who tipically matriculate. They probably got a feeling that "higher ranked" medical schools would grab you and offer you a scholarship or most likely that a mid tier med school would offer you a schoolarship and tempt you to accept their offer of acceptance. Schools are very protective of their yield.

I do agree that they should deliver their rejections as they go instead of waiting until the very last day.
 
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Maybe they felt that you were overqualified, compared to the pool of applicants who tipically matriculate. They probably got a feeling that "higher ranked" medical schools would grab you and offer you a scholarship or most likely that a mid tier med school would offer you a schoolarship and tempt you to accept their offer of acceptance. Schools are very protective of their yield.

I do agree that they should deliver their rejections as they go instead of waiting until the very last day.
State schools don't yield protect, as many applicants, like this one, would choose their state school for financial reasons.
 
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Do you have a better explanation as to why me and a lot of my buddies who are 520+ scorers and excellent all around applicants struck out at this school, while a handful of our peers, who have physician parents, with sub 510 MCATs and near zero ECs had so much luck? They only got into UMass, no other schools, while those of us who were rejected got into to tons of other schools. I struggle to find a reason other than them being the child of a physician. But I'm open to listen to your reasons as to how this could happen. Year after year btw, same thing happened last year with a lot of strong applicants that I personally know.
Perhaps correlation vs causation is at play here. Having physician parents working and practicing in MA may facilitate "more interesting" clinical opportunities in the community. The claim that an institution is unfairly admitting the children of physicians is quite serious. If it were true, a lot of data would be needed to support the claim - a handful of people anecdotally isn’t enough. Hey, n=1 but I come from a medical family and I got rejected. Likely, the admissions process is too opaque to make conclusions like "X got in because of Y."

They're just trying to build their class and that's fine. I believe everyone who got in deserves their acceptance. For me, it's not *that* I was rejected, it's *how* I was rejected.
 
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Maybe they felt that you were overqualified, compared to the pool of applicants who tipically matriculate. They probably got a feeling that "higher ranked" medical schools would grab you and offer you a scholarship or most likely that a mid tier med school would offer you a schoolarship and tempt you to accept their offer of acceptance. Schools are very protective of their yield.

I do agree that they should deliver their rejections as they go instead of waiting until the very last day.
As someone who got into a "higher ranked" school that I would've chosen over UMass and got interviews at many other "higher ranked" schools, I personally don't believe I was yield protected and I know of people who are extremely qualified (multiple A's from top schools, ultra-high stats, etc.) who did get in. I think it comes down to a difference in what UMass is looking for vs other schools and my individual performance on different schools' interview days.
 
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Do you have a better explanation as to why me and a lot of my buddies who are 520+ scorers and excellent all around applicants struck out at this school, while a handful of our peers, who have physician parents, with sub 510 MCATs and near zero ECs had so much luck? They only got into UMass, no other schools, while those of us who were rejected got into to tons of other schools. I struggle to find a reason other than them being the child of a physician. But I'm open to listen to your reasons as to how this could happen. Year after year btw, same thing happened last year with a lot of strong applicants that I personally know.
I’m curious what proportion of those who were rejected today are males.

UMass clearly discriminates against males. 55 men and 143 women in the most recent class, and pretty close to that ratio in the few years before that too. That isn’t by chance.

Edit: don’t want to come across as sexist. However I do believe that med school classes shouldn’t be more than 60% of one particular gender.
 
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I’m curious what proportion of those who were rejected today are males.

UMass clearly discriminates against males. 55 men and 143 females in the most recent class, and pretty close to that ratio in the few years before that too. That isn’t by chance.

Edit: don’t want to come across as sexist. However I do believe that med school classes shouldn’t be more than 60% of one particular gender.
55 men and 143 ***women***

Diverse and balanced classes are statistically more effective in educating informed and culturally competent physicians. I'm sure class demographics are taken into account with UMass' emphasis on social values. Many other factors are in play, however, that might skew the gender ratios, such as CASPER testing, interview performance, experiences/understanding of social determinants of health. I'd find it hard to believe that UMass is discriminating against males, when they probably have enough difficulty in turning thousands of applications into a few hundred acceptances.
 
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I’m curious what proportion of those who were rejected today are males.

UMass clearly discriminates against males. 55 men and 143 women in the most recent class, and pretty close to that ratio in the few years before that too. That isn’t by chance.

Edit: don’t want to come across as sexist. However I do believe that med school classes shouldn’t be more than 60% of one particular gender.
This is the trend across the board not just at UMass. Not 100% sure but I remember hearing somewhere that women nowadays are generally performing better than men in higher Ed (saying this as a guy)
 
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219 days post interview for an R yesterday lol. Don’t care that I got rejected, I get it, you can’t get into every school, but the way they’ve handled this is incredibly disrespectful and unprofessional. So much for “wanting to be respectful of our time and aiming to get back decisions in 4-6 weeks.”
 
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Hi all, I just declined my A. I hope one of the instate folks get it!! Best of luck to everyone.
 
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Does anyone know when the actual deadline for UMass to narrow to one acceptance is? Like when can WL folks expect to start hearing news? Ik some schools have their CTE deadline as after May 1st which is why I’m asking
 
Does anyone know when the actual deadline for UMass to narrow to one acceptance is? Like when can WL folks expect to start hearing news? Ik some schools have their CTE deadline as after May 1st which is why I’m asking

On their website, they say it's 4/30 (or the next business day if 4/30 is a weekend/holiday, which in this case it's not) to narrow down to one acceptance (i.e., the PTE deadline). To officially CTE, that's July 15.
 
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Anyone know how many roughly withdrew yesterday? Like has the Facebook chat decreased in size?
 
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On their website, they say it's 4/30 (or the next business day if 4/30 is a weekend/holiday, which in this case it's not) to narrow down to one acceptance (i.e., the PTE deadline). To officially CTE, that's July 15.

just wondering -- if we have only 1 A by 4/30 and 1 WL, what happens if we are by chance later offered a second A through that WL. would we just notify schools and pick 1 school to commit to immediately?
 
just wondering -- if we have only 1 A by 4/30 and 1 WL, what happens if we are by chance later offered a second A through that WL. would we just notify schools and pick 1 school to commit to immediately?


AAMC traffic rules dictate that you can only hold down one acceptance after 4/30.

From my understanding...
Let's say you have an A from School A and a WL from School B. On 4/30, you selected PTE for School A. At some point after that, you received an A from School B. If you prefer School B over School A, you can change your PTE selection to School B; however, that will mean that you would need to turn down the A from School A.

Folks here can correct me if I'm wrong. For some reason, this was a doozy concept for me to grasp.
 
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AAMC traffic rules dictate that you can only hold down one acceptance after 4/30.

From my understanding...
Let's say you have an A from School A and a WL from School B. On 4/30, you selected PTE for School A. At some point after that, you received an A from School B. If you prefer School B over School A, you can change your PTE selection to School B; however, that will mean that you would need to turn down the A from School A.

Folks here can correct me if I'm wrong. For some reason, this was a doozy concept for me to grasp.

for sure thank you!
 


AAMC traffic rules dictate that you can only hold down one acceptance after 4/30.

From my understanding...
Let's say you have an A from School A and a WL from School B. On 4/30, you selected PTE for School A. At some point after that, you received an A from School B. If you prefer School B over School A, you can change your PTE selection to School B; however, that will mean that you would need to turn down the A from School A.

Folks here can correct me if I'm wrong. For some reason, this was a doozy concept for me to grasp.

Between PTE (4/30) and CTE (7/15), you can turn down the A, and you can't after CTE,
 
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just wondering -- if we have only 1 A by 4/30 and 1 WL, what happens if we are by chance later offered a second A through that WL. would we just notify schools and pick 1 school to commit to immediately?
same situation and thats how I understand it. Right now i chose PTE for my only A (school A). With this option i can still stay on WL for school B. If you get accepted to School B and thats where you prefer, choose CTE for school B which will automatically withdraw your A from School A (but i think you still need to communicate that w/ school A). But pay attention to school specific ddl which can be different from the CYMS ddl
 
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Do we know when we'll start hearing back about us WL folks?
Based on last year's forum, it looks like initial WL movement began the Wednesday after PTE deadline (May 3rd). If that is any indication, any day beyond this point is fair game. So I wouldn't hold my breath and just let the decisions come. Manifesting for you to hear some good news!
 
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same situation and thats how I understand it. Right now i chose PTE for my only A (school A). With this option i can still stay on WL for school B. If you get accepted to School B and thats where you prefer, choose CTE for school B which will automatically withdraw your A from School A (but i think you still need to communicate that w/ school A). But pay attention to school specific ddl which can be different from the CYMS ddl

thank you!!!
 
Maybe today will be the day when WL movement starts? We know how much UMass loves Fridays
 
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Does anyone know how hard it is to become an in-state resident in Mass? For example if we started out of state at this school is it possible to eventually become an in-state resident during their 2nd year forward?
 
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Does anyone know how hard it is to become an in-state resident in Mass? For example if we started out of state at this school is it possible to eventually become an in-state resident during their 2nd year forward?

You can become a resident of MA whenever you want - all it takes is a change of address to one in MA. However, you would still be charged OOS tuition by UMass, regardless of whether you hit that 7-year mark during your time as a student at UMass Chan. The 7 years of residency needs to be fulfilled prior to enrollment in order to be considered IS.

Hopefully that answers your question?
 
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Does anyone know if there is a separate waitlist for people waitlisted for MD and PURCH?
 
They are probably delayed due to the FAFSA issues. Some schools are giving accepted students an extension for a financial aid offer
 
Lol last year there were problems with the AAMC CYMS, this year it's FAFSA
 
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Just withdrew my A for MD + LEAD, good luck y'all!
 
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Withdrew acceptance for MD + PURCH. Good luck!
 
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Anyone else feel like the wait for WL movement is never-ending?
 
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Supposedly it has to do with FAFSA delays.

The latest delay for the 2024-2025 FAFSA is the result of errors in updating the indexing formula for the Student Aid Index (SAI), a figure used to determine how much aid students qualify for. Starting with the 2024-2025 school year, the SAI replaced the Expected Family Contribution calculation and is supposed to reflect cost changes by adjusting for inflation.

However, in its initial calculation, the Department of Education didn't account for inflation (welp go figure). Without that adjustment, students would be qualifying for much less assistance. The fix is estimated to open up an additional $1.8 billion in student aid.

So basically:
A federal error means some applications are now having to be reprocessed --> This delays accurate student financial information being reported to institutions --> Institutions will be significantly delayed creating financial aid packages for students --> Currently accepted students' decisions to matriculate/decline acceptance are delayed until they can receive and review financial aid offers --> WL movement is delayed
(woohoo domino effect)

FAFSA apps generally take up to 3 weeks to process, the wave of WL-->A may well be delayed to later this month :confused:

I do agree though - the wait is rough.
 
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Supposedly it has to do with FAFSA delays.

The latest delay for the 2024-2025 FAFSA is the result of errors in updating the indexing formula for the Student Aid Index (SAI), a figure used to determine how much aid students qualify for. Starting with the 2024-2025 school year, the SAI replaced the Expected Family Contribution calculation and is supposed to reflect cost changes by adjusting for inflation.

However, in its initial calculation, the Department of Education didn't account for inflation (welp go figure). Without that adjustment, students would be qualifying for much less assistance. The fix is estimated to open up an additional $1.8 billion in student aid.

So basically:
A federal error means some applications are now having to be reprocessed --> This delays accurate student financial information being reported to institutions --> Institutions will be significantly delayed creating financial aid packages for students --> Currently accepted students' decisions to matriculate/decline acceptance are delayed until they can receive and review financial aid offers --> WL movement is delayed
(woohoo domino effect)

FAFSA apps generally take up to 3 weeks to process, the wave of WL-->A may well be delayed to later this month :confused:

I do agree though - the wait is rough.
Thanks so much for laying this all out in detail, it's very appreciated! I feel like I can (anxiously) relax and check my portal less frequently.
 
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