Aug 14, 2017
42
73
31
Status
Medical Student
Hi Everyone!

I am posting on behalf of the NYUSoM Ambassadors who will be monitoring this thread for questions/comments/concerns and anything that we can do to help make this process easier for you all!

Reply to this (so we get the little notification) if you have any questions or @ us, and we'll do our best to answer them as quickly as possible!

In terms of what NYU looks for in applicants, it's the same as most medical schools — it's less about checking boxes and more about standing out in some way. We have people who have focused heavily on research, some who dedicated themselves more to community service, and others who have taken less traditional paths to medical school. There’s no one way to do it. It’s about finding what you’re passionate about and pursuing it.

A bit about the things that are unique to NYU:

Financial Aid:
-
Every MD student who is accepted to NYUSoM and chooses to matriculate receive a FULL TUITION SCHOLARSHIP, no strings attached! A percentage of the class also receives full cost of living scholarships.

3-year MD:
The Three-Year MD Degree Pathway provides an accelerated track for a select group of eligible students. All students graduating from the Three-Year MD Degree Pathway will participate in the NRMP Residency Match and will be offered acceptance into an NYU Langone Medical Center residency program of their choice at the time of admission.

When you can apply:
-Prospective students can apply at the time of their initial application. Deadline for applying is March 1, 2020.
-Matriculated students in our Four-Year MD program can opt in to the Three-Year MD Pathway either at the end of their first or second year of MD training. MSTP students can apply during the fall of the year they complete the PhD portion of their combined degree.
-Deadlines: Applications for the Three-Year MD pathway are available through the applicant portal. Important deadlines to be aware of are as follows: (1) tertiary application deadline is March 1st by 11:59 PM EST; (2) interviews with residency program directors will occur in late March through July.


MMI:
-Series of 8 interview stations consisting of timed interview scenarios
-One of our rooms is more like a traditional interview, which is double the time of a normal station and allows you to talk about your application.
-Scenarios may explore an applicant’s communication skills, ability to work as part of a team, problem solving capabilities, integrity, ethics and judgment. You will receive a prompt of the scenario or question you will address before entering the station. You will then have two minutes to gather your thoughts before you enter the room.

CASPer:
-For the upcoming year, students applying to NYUSoM will be required to take CASPer.

Admissions:
Is rolling this year, and will be sent out continuously after the first date that acceptances can be sent out.

Housing:
Approximately 90% of our students live in on-campus housing, and they are subsidized monthly rents that are way below market rents for the area. Shared apartments for example are approximately $1050/month. The rooms are either quads, doubles, or studios. Similarly sized apartments in the neighborhood are often double that or more, so the student housing is a fantastic deal.


NYUSoM Community:
NYUSoM has a robust student community. From formal community events supported by the University as a whole to informal gatherings, there are many ways in which the students here are able to come together. Official gatherings include events such as the annual Culture Show, at which students can showcase their musical and artistic talents, and Student Appreciation Week, where the administration puts on a week of events to help students come and destress together outside of the classroom (its actually really cool, they give us loads of free food and prizes). There are also lots of informal community events organized by students, such as trips to the MET and afternoons in Central Park. In addition, we are also part of the NYU community as a whole, and as such get free admissions to tons of events and museums throughout the city.

One of the nicest aspects of the student community at NYUSoM is how the students support each other. Because our classes are small (102 per class) and most students live together in the NYUSoM Housing, the first-year class quickly becomes a tight-knit group. An example of this sense of community is how readily students share their study materials to help ensure we all do well. Before every exam, many students post their study guides or flashcard decks to our class Facebook page/GroupMe/slack channel (we have all three) for everyone to use. There is a sense that we're all in this together, and that we have to help each other along the way. Having a supportive community of students has been one of the most important factors in making my medical school experience so enjoyable and successful.

New York City:
New York City is a great place to be for medical school, and NYU’s location in Midtown is perfect for taking advantage of all NYC has to offer. NYU has three private hospitals, the country's premier public hospital in Bellevue (also where NBC's show New Amsterdam is filmed), and a government hospital all within easy walking distance of each other-serving all aspects of our diverse patient community. The city is an incredibly vibrant place. Whether you want to spend a sunny afternoon in Central Park, enter a lottery for discounted Broadway tickets, or explore the MET or the Museum of Natural History, there is always something exciting to do only a short subway ride away. You can also get any type of food you want at any time of day delivered right to your apartment, which is pretty amazing.

One great thing about New York is that, despite its size, it’s still a very safe place to live. Statistically, it’s the safest large city in the U.S., and after living here for a year, I have yet to experience a situation in which I felt unsafe.

I love the excitement of the city, but on those occasions on which I want to get away from the hustle and bustle, there are many tranquil corners of the city to explore. From Central Park to Riverside Park to the Cloisters, there are plenty of places to relax surrounded by nature.

At the end of the day, NYC has something for everyone, which is what makes it such a special place. I can’t think of any other place I would rather be in medical school.


Of note:
-NYU has a group of current students that function as ambassadors and are available to help with questions/admissions process in general:
-Email: [email protected]
-Link for ambassador profiles in case you want to contact someone with specific interests: MD Student Ambassador Program | NYU Langone Health
-Dean Rivera will hold several Twitter chats where you have an opportunity to ask him any questions @RafaelRiveraMD
Social media:
-IG: NYU School of Medicine (@nyuschoolofmed) • Instagram photos and videos
-Student NYUSoM IG: NYU School of Medicine (@nyusomadmissions) • Instagram photos and videos
-Twitter:NYU School of Med (@nyuschoolofmed) | Twitter
-Facebook:
NYU School of Medicine

Good luck everyone!
 
Last edited:
Feb 26, 2019
631
897
41
Hi Everyone!

I am posting on behalf of the NYUSoM Ambassadors who will be monitoring this thread for questions/comments/concerns and anything that we can do to help make this process easier for you all!

Reply to this (so we get the little notification) if you have any questions or @ us, and we'll do our best to answer them as quickly as possible!

In terms of what NYU looks for in applicants, it's the same as most medical schools — it's less about checking boxes and more about standing out in some way. We have people who have focused heavily on research, some who dedicated themselves more to community service, and others who have taken less traditional paths to medical school. There’s no one way to do it. It’s about finding what you’re passionate about and pursuing it.

A bit about the interview process and things unique to NYU:

MMI:
-Series of 8 interview stations consisting of timed interview scenarios
-One of our rooms is more like a traditional interview, which is double the time of a normal station and allows you to talk about your application.
-Scenarios may explore an applicant’s communication skills, ability to work as part of a team, problem solving capabilities, integrity, ethics and judgment. You will receive a prompt of the scenario or question you will address before entering the station. You will then have two minutes to gather your thoughts before you enter the room.

CASPer:
-For the upcoming year, students applying to NYUSoM will be required to take CASPer.

Admissions:
Is rolling this year, and will be sent out continuously after the first date that acceptances can be sent out.

Housing:
Approximately 90% of our students live in on-campus housing, and they are subsidized monthly rents that are way below market rents for the area. Shared apartments for example are approximately $1050/month. The rooms are either quads, doubles, or studios. Similarly sized apartments in the neighborhood are often double that or more, so the student housing is a fantastic deal.

Financial Aid:
-
All students who are accepted to NYUSoM and choose to matriculate receive a full-tuition scholarship, no strings attached. A percentage of the class will also receive a full cost of living scholarship.

NYUSoM Community:
NYUSoM has a robust student community. From formal community events supported by the University as a whole to informal gatherings, there are many ways in which the students here are able to come together. Official gatherings include events such as the annual Culture Show, at which students can showcase their musical and artistic talents, and Student Appreciation Week, where the administration puts on a week of events to help students come and destress together outside of the classroom (its actually really cool, they give us loads of free food and prizes). There are also lots of informal community events organized by students, such as trips to the MET and afternoons in Central Park. In addition, we are also part of the NYU community as a whole, and as such get free admissions to tons of events and museums throughout the city.

One of the nicest aspects of the student community at NYUSoM is how the students support each other. Because our classes are small (we're down to about 102 per class now) and most students live together in the dormitories, the first-year class quickly becomes a tight-knit group. An example of this sense of community is how readily students share their study materials to help ensure we all do well. Before every exam, many students post their study guides or flashcard decks to our class Facebook page/groupme/slack channel (we have all three) for everyone to use. There is a sense that we're all in this together, and that we have to help each other along the way. Having a supportive community of students has been one of the most important factors in making my medical school experience so enjoyable and successful.

New York City:
New York City is a great place to be for medical school, and NYU’s location in Midtown is perfect for taking advantage of all NYC has to offer. The city is an incredibly vibrant place. Whether you want to spend a sunny afternoon in Central Park, enter a lottery for discounted Broadway tickets, or explore the MET or the Museum of Natural History, there is always something exciting to do only a short subway ride away. You can also get any type of food you want at any time of day delivered right to your apartment, which is pretty amazing.

One great thing about New York is that, despite its size, it’s still a very safe place to live. Statistically, it’s the safest large city in the U.S., and after living here for a year, I have yet to experience a situation in which I felt unsafe.

I love the excitement of the city, but on those occasions on which I want to get away from the hustle and bustle, there are many tranquil corners of the city to explore. From Central Park to Riverside Park to the Cloisters, there are plenty of places to relax surrounded by nature.

At the end of the day, NYC has something for everyone, which is what makes it such a special place. I can’t think of any other place I would rather be in medical school.

3-year MD:
The Three-Year MD Degree Pathway provides an accelerated track for a select group of eligible students. All students graduating from the Three-Year MD Degree Pathway will participate in the Main Residency Match and will be offered acceptance into an NYU Langone Medical Center residency program of their choice at the time of admission.

When you can apply:
-Prospective students can apply at the time of their initial application. Deadline for applying is March 1, 2020.
-Matriculated students in our Four-Year MD program can opt in to the Three-Year MD Pathway either during their first year of training, or just before their third year of training, as long as there are still spots open in that program
-Deadlines: Applications for the Three-Year MD pathway are available through the applicant portal. Important deadlines to be aware of are as follows: (1) tertiary application deadline is March 1st by 11:59 PM EST; (2) interviews with residency program directors will occur in late March through July.

Of note:
-NYU has a group of current students that function as ambassadors and are available to help with questions/admissions process in general:
-Email: [email protected]
-Link for ambassador profiles in case you want to contact someone with specific interests: MD Student Ambassador Program | NYU Langone Health
-Dean Rivera will hold several Twitter chats where you have an opportunity to ask him any questions @RafaelRiveraMD
Social media:
-IG: NYU School of Medicine (@nyuschoolofmed) • Instagram photos and videos
-Student NYUSoM IG: NYU School of Medicine (@nyusomadmissions) • Instagram photos and videos
-Twitter:NYU School of Med (@nyuschoolofmed) | Twitter
-Facebook:
NYU School of Medicine
If we're interested in the Three-Year MD pathway, do we need to fill out the tertiary application before interviewing? Wondering if it's even worth bothering with the tertiary application if I don't end up receiving an interview.
 

kimmy1994

2+ Year Member
Aug 17, 2016
3
0
1
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi Everyone!

I am posting on behalf of the NYUSoM Ambassadors who will be monitoring this thread for questions/comments/concerns and anything that we can do to help make this process easier for you all!

Reply to this (so we get the little notification) if you have any questions or @ us, and we'll do our best to answer them as quickly as possible!

In terms of what NYU looks for in applicants, it's the same as most medical schools — it's less about checking boxes and more about standing out in some way. We have people who have focused heavily on research, some who dedicated themselves more to community service, and others who have taken less traditional paths to medical school. There’s no one way to do it. It’s about finding what you’re passionate about and pursuing it.

A bit about the things that are unique to NYU:

Financial Aid:
-
Every MD student who is accepted to NYUSoM and chooses to matriculate receive a FULL TUITION SCHOLARSHIP, no strings attached! A percentage of the class also receives full cost of living scholarships.

3-year MD:
The Three-Year MD Degree Pathway provides an accelerated track for a select group of eligible students. All students graduating from the Three-Year MD Degree Pathway will participate in the NRMP Residency Match and will be offered acceptance into an NYU Langone Medical Center residency program of their choice at the time of admission.

When you can apply:
-Prospective students can apply at the time of their initial application. Deadline for applying is March 1, 2020.
-Matriculated students in our Four-Year MD program can opt in to the Three-Year MD Pathway either at the end of their first or second year of MD training. MSTP students can apply during the fall of the year they complete the PhD portion of their combined degree.
-Deadlines: Applications for the Three-Year MD pathway are available through the applicant portal. Important deadlines to be aware of are as follows: (1) tertiary application deadline is March 1st by 11:59 PM EST; (2) interviews with residency program directors will occur in late March through July.


MMI:
-Series of 8 interview stations consisting of timed interview scenarios
-One of our rooms is more like a traditional interview, which is double the time of a normal station and allows you to talk about your application.
-Scenarios may explore an applicant’s communication skills, ability to work as part of a team, problem solving capabilities, integrity, ethics and judgment. You will receive a prompt of the scenario or question you will address before entering the station. You will then have two minutes to gather your thoughts before you enter the room.

CASPer:
-For the upcoming year, students applying to NYUSoM will be required to take CASPer.

Admissions:
Is rolling this year, and will be sent out continuously after the first date that acceptances can be sent out.

Housing:
Approximately 90% of our students live in on-campus housing, and they are subsidized monthly rents that are way below market rents for the area. Shared apartments for example are approximately $1050/month. The rooms are either quads, doubles, or studios. Similarly sized apartments in the neighborhood are often double that or more, so the student housing is a fantastic deal.


NYUSoM Community:
NYUSoM has a robust student community. From formal community events supported by the University as a whole to informal gatherings, there are many ways in which the students here are able to come together. Official gatherings include events such as the annual Culture Show, at which students can showcase their musical and artistic talents, and Student Appreciation Week, where the administration puts on a week of events to help students come and destress together outside of the classroom (its actually really cool, they give us loads of free food and prizes). There are also lots of informal community events organized by students, such as trips to the MET and afternoons in Central Park. In addition, we are also part of the NYU community as a whole, and as such get free admissions to tons of events and museums throughout the city.

One of the nicest aspects of the student community at NYUSoM is how the students support each other. Because our classes are small (102 per class) and most students live together in the NYUSoM Housing, the first-year class quickly becomes a tight-knit group. An example of this sense of community is how readily students share their study materials to help ensure we all do well. Before every exam, many students post their study guides or flashcard decks to our class Facebook page/GroupMe/slack channel (we have all three) for everyone to use. There is a sense that we're all in this together, and that we have to help each other along the way. Having a supportive community of students has been one of the most important factors in making my medical school experience so enjoyable and successful.

New York City:
New York City is a great place to be for medical school, and NYU’s location in Midtown is perfect for taking advantage of all NYC has to offer. NYU has three private hospitals, the country's premier public hospital in Bellevue (also where NBC's show New Amsterdam is filmed), and a government hospital all within easy walking distance of each other-serving all aspects of our diverse patient community. The city is an incredibly vibrant place. Whether you want to spend a sunny afternoon in Central Park, enter a lottery for discounted Broadway tickets, or explore the MET or the Museum of Natural History, there is always something exciting to do only a short subway ride away. You can also get any type of food you want at any time of day delivered right to your apartment, which is pretty amazing.

One great thing about New York is that, despite its size, it’s still a very safe place to live. Statistically, it’s the safest large city in the U.S., and after living here for a year, I have yet to experience a situation in which I felt unsafe.

I love the excitement of the city, but on those occasions on which I want to get away from the hustle and bustle, there are many tranquil corners of the city to explore. From Central Park to Riverside Park to the Cloisters, there are plenty of places to relax surrounded by nature.

At the end of the day, NYC has something for everyone, which is what makes it such a special place. I can’t think of any other place I would rather be in medical school.


Of note:
-NYU has a group of current students that function as ambassadors and are available to help with questions/admissions process in general:
-Email: [email protected]
-Link for ambassador profiles in case you want to contact someone with specific interests: MD Student Ambassador Program | NYU Langone Health
-Dean Rivera will hold several Twitter chats where you have an opportunity to ask him any questions @RafaelRiveraMD
Social media:
-IG: NYU School of Medicine (@nyuschoolofmed) • Instagram photos and videos
-Student NYUSoM IG: NYU School of Medicine (@nyusomadmissions) • Instagram photos and videos
-Twitter:NYU School of Med (@nyuschoolofmed) | Twitter
-Facebook:
NYU School of Medicine

Good luck everyone!
I'm trying to decide on a test date for CASPer. Does CASPer have to be scored and sent to NYU for our secondary to be considered complete and to have our app go under review? Thanks!
 
Aug 14, 2017
42
73
31
Status
Medical Student
@kimmy1994 thanks for the question! Unfortunately, as a student here, I'm not as familiar with how the application is working with CASPer since it is new this year. You can email our admissions office at [email protected] and they'll be able to give you an answer!
 

MemeLord

Spunky, Master of Sleeps
Feb 21, 2018
3,623
3,381
41
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi Everyone!

I am posting on behalf of the NYUSoM Ambassadors who will be monitoring this thread for questions/comments/concerns and anything that we can do to help make this process easier for you all!

Reply to this (so we get the little notification) if you have any questions or @ us, and we'll do our best to answer them as quickly as possible!

In terms of what NYU looks for in applicants, it's the same as most medical schools — it's less about checking boxes and more about standing out in some way. We have people who have focused heavily on research, some who dedicated themselves more to community service, and others who have taken less traditional paths to medical school. There’s no one way to do it. It’s about finding what you’re passionate about and pursuing it.

A bit about the things that are unique to NYU:

Financial Aid:
-
Every MD student who is accepted to NYUSoM and chooses to matriculate receive a FULL TUITION SCHOLARSHIP, no strings attached! A percentage of the class also receives full cost of living scholarships.

3-year MD:
The Three-Year MD Degree Pathway provides an accelerated track for a select group of eligible students. All students graduating from the Three-Year MD Degree Pathway will participate in the NRMP Residency Match and will be offered acceptance into an NYU Langone Medical Center residency program of their choice at the time of admission.

When you can apply:
-Prospective students can apply at the time of their initial application. Deadline for applying is March 1, 2020.
-Matriculated students in our Four-Year MD program can opt in to the Three-Year MD Pathway either at the end of their first or second year of MD training. MSTP students can apply during the fall of the year they complete the PhD portion of their combined degree.
-Deadlines: Applications for the Three-Year MD pathway are available through the applicant portal. Important deadlines to be aware of are as follows: (1) tertiary application deadline is March 1st by 11:59 PM EST; (2) interviews with residency program directors will occur in late March through July.


MMI:
-Series of 8 interview stations consisting of timed interview scenarios
-One of our rooms is more like a traditional interview, which is double the time of a normal station and allows you to talk about your application.
-Scenarios may explore an applicant’s communication skills, ability to work as part of a team, problem solving capabilities, integrity, ethics and judgment. You will receive a prompt of the scenario or question you will address before entering the station. You will then have two minutes to gather your thoughts before you enter the room.

CASPer:
-For the upcoming year, students applying to NYUSoM will be required to take CASPer.

Admissions:
Is rolling this year, and will be sent out continuously after the first date that acceptances can be sent out.

Housing:
Approximately 90% of our students live in on-campus housing, and they are subsidized monthly rents that are way below market rents for the area. Shared apartments for example are approximately $1050/month. The rooms are either quads, doubles, or studios. Similarly sized apartments in the neighborhood are often double that or more, so the student housing is a fantastic deal.


NYUSoM Community:
NYUSoM has a robust student community. From formal community events supported by the University as a whole to informal gatherings, there are many ways in which the students here are able to come together. Official gatherings include events such as the annual Culture Show, at which students can showcase their musical and artistic talents, and Student Appreciation Week, where the administration puts on a week of events to help students come and destress together outside of the classroom (its actually really cool, they give us loads of free food and prizes). There are also lots of informal community events organized by students, such as trips to the MET and afternoons in Central Park. In addition, we are also part of the NYU community as a whole, and as such get free admissions to tons of events and museums throughout the city.

One of the nicest aspects of the student community at NYUSoM is how the students support each other. Because our classes are small (102 per class) and most students live together in the NYUSoM Housing, the first-year class quickly becomes a tight-knit group. An example of this sense of community is how readily students share their study materials to help ensure we all do well. Before every exam, many students post their study guides or flashcard decks to our class Facebook page/GroupMe/slack channel (we have all three) for everyone to use. There is a sense that we're all in this together, and that we have to help each other along the way. Having a supportive community of students has been one of the most important factors in making my medical school experience so enjoyable and successful.

New York City:
New York City is a great place to be for medical school, and NYU’s location in Midtown is perfect for taking advantage of all NYC has to offer. NYU has three private hospitals, the country's premier public hospital in Bellevue (also where NBC's show New Amsterdam is filmed), and a government hospital all within easy walking distance of each other-serving all aspects of our diverse patient community. The city is an incredibly vibrant place. Whether you want to spend a sunny afternoon in Central Park, enter a lottery for discounted Broadway tickets, or explore the MET or the Museum of Natural History, there is always something exciting to do only a short subway ride away. You can also get any type of food you want at any time of day delivered right to your apartment, which is pretty amazing.

One great thing about New York is that, despite its size, it’s still a very safe place to live. Statistically, it’s the safest large city in the U.S., and after living here for a year, I have yet to experience a situation in which I felt unsafe.

I love the excitement of the city, but on those occasions on which I want to get away from the hustle and bustle, there are many tranquil corners of the city to explore. From Central Park to Riverside Park to the Cloisters, there are plenty of places to relax surrounded by nature.

At the end of the day, NYC has something for everyone, which is what makes it such a special place. I can’t think of any other place I would rather be in medical school.


Of note:
-NYU has a group of current students that function as ambassadors and are available to help with questions/admissions process in general:
-Email: [email protected]
-Link for ambassador profiles in case you want to contact someone with specific interests: MD Student Ambassador Program | NYU Langone Health
-Dean Rivera will hold several Twitter chats where you have an opportunity to ask him any questions @RafaelRiveraMD
Social media:
-IG: NYU School of Medicine (@nyuschoolofmed) • Instagram photos and videos
-Student NYUSoM IG: NYU School of Medicine (@nyusomadmissions) • Instagram photos and videos
-Twitter:NYU School of Med (@nyuschoolofmed) | Twitter
-Facebook:
NYU School of Medicine

Good luck everyone!
Approximately 90% of our students live in on-campus housing, and they are subsidized monthly rents that are way below market rents for the area. Shared apartments for example are approximately $1050/month. The rooms are either quads, doubles, or studios. Similarly sized apartments in the neighborhood are often double that or more, so the student housing is a fantastic deal.
I had a question about the on-campus student housing. Do you know if the student housing is available to students who are married/have children? If not, are there subsidized options available for these students as well?

Edit: If there is a Non-trad/student with dependents that I can reach out to I would greatly appreciate it!
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: EmbryonalCarcinoma
Mar 26, 2019
36
50
31
Status
Pre-Medical
@NYUAmbassadors This is probably a worthless question, but in your honest opinion, is it honestly even worth applying here? NYU was my top choice a few years ago before free tuition and now I feel like my GPA rules me out.

I'm not special in any way besides a long track record of service and a decent upward trend.
 
  • Like
Reactions: diasterdream
Apr 18, 2019
12
0
1
@NYUAmbassadors I know the secondaries for this cycle haven't been released yet, but had a question about this NYU prompt from last year:
"If you have taken any time off from your studies, either during or after college, please describe what you have done during this time and your reasons for doing so."

I'm non-trad and started my pre-med requirements right after college graduation. I finished them (except one semester physics) last fall semester 2018 and then took my MCAT this spring (no classes - just MCAT prep and my other commitments).

I haven't decided yet but may take that last semester of physics this summer or fall.

1) Would this spring when I was studying for MCAT be considered "taking time off from my studies"?
2) During this summer or fall, would the semester that I'm not taking classes be considered time off?
3) I will have finished all my classes this fall, and would take no classes next spring or summer (I'd hopefully be accepted by that point lol). Would next spring/summer need to be explained in this secondary?

Just not sure if this prompt applies to me and am loving what I've heard about NYUSoM so far. Thanks so much in advance!
 

texasvandy

2+ Year Member
Oct 21, 2014
175
64
71
"If you have taken any time off from your studies, either during or after college, please describe what you have done during this time and your reasons for doing so."

This is specifically asking if you took a break during school or after finishing college. Any time longer than a school break counts as a break. Technically you have been on a break since finishing college even if you were doing prerequisites if you were not in a post bac program and doing it on your own. For example, did you attend school full time for prerequisites but was this outside of a specified degree plan?
 
Apr 18, 2019
12
0
1
"If you have taken any time off from your studies, either during or after college, please describe what you have done during this time and your reasons for doing so."

This is specifically asking if you took a break during school or after finishing college. Any time longer than a school break counts as a break. Technically you have been on a break since finishing college even if you were doing prerequisites if you were not in a post bac program and doing it on your own. For example, did you attend school full time for prerequisites but was this outside of a specified degree plan?
It was outside a specified degree plan - where I've completed my requirements they do have a post-bacc but I'm taking all the required courses without being in the official program since the program is significantly more expensive.

So in your opinion, since I took the courses outside of a post-bacc everything after college graduation would fall under this prompt?
 
Dec 25, 2018
37
19
11
Hi Everyone!

I am posting on behalf of the NYUSoM Ambassadors who will be monitoring this thread for questions/comments/concerns and anything that we can do to help make this process easier for you all!

Reply to this (so we get the little notification) if you have any questions or @ us, and we'll do our best to answer them as quickly as possible!

In terms of what NYU looks for in applicants, it's the same as most medical schools — it's less about checking boxes and more about standing out in some way. We have people who have focused heavily on research, some who dedicated themselves more to community service, and others who have taken less traditional paths to medical school. There’s no one way to do it. It’s about finding what you’re passionate about and pursuing it.

A bit about the things that are unique to NYU:

Financial Aid:
-
Every MD student who is accepted to NYUSoM and chooses to matriculate receive a FULL TUITION SCHOLARSHIP, no strings attached! A percentage of the class also receives full cost of living scholarships.

3-year MD:
The Three-Year MD Degree Pathway provides an accelerated track for a select group of eligible students. All students graduating from the Three-Year MD Degree Pathway will participate in the NRMP Residency Match and will be offered acceptance into an NYU Langone Medical Center residency program of their choice at the time of admission.

When you can apply:
-Prospective students can apply at the time of their initial application. Deadline for applying is March 1, 2020.
-Matriculated students in our Four-Year MD program can opt in to the Three-Year MD Pathway either at the end of their first or second year of MD training. MSTP students can apply during the fall of the year they complete the PhD portion of their combined degree.
-Deadlines: Applications for the Three-Year MD pathway are available through the applicant portal. Important deadlines to be aware of are as follows: (1) tertiary application deadline is March 1st by 11:59 PM EST; (2) interviews with residency program directors will occur in late March through July.


MMI:
-Series of 8 interview stations consisting of timed interview scenarios
-One of our rooms is more like a traditional interview, which is double the time of a normal station and allows you to talk about your application.
-Scenarios may explore an applicant’s communication skills, ability to work as part of a team, problem solving capabilities, integrity, ethics and judgment. You will receive a prompt of the scenario or question you will address before entering the station. You will then have two minutes to gather your thoughts before you enter the room.

CASPer:
-For the upcoming year, students applying to NYUSoM will be required to take CASPer.

Admissions:
Is rolling this year, and will be sent out continuously after the first date that acceptances can be sent out.

Housing:
Approximately 90% of our students live in on-campus housing, and they are subsidized monthly rents that are way below market rents for the area. Shared apartments for example are approximately $1050/month. The rooms are either quads, doubles, or studios. Similarly sized apartments in the neighborhood are often double that or more, so the student housing is a fantastic deal.


NYUSoM Community:
NYUSoM has a robust student community. From formal community events supported by the University as a whole to informal gatherings, there are many ways in which the students here are able to come together. Official gatherings include events such as the annual Culture Show, at which students can showcase their musical and artistic talents, and Student Appreciation Week, where the administration puts on a week of events to help students come and destress together outside of the classroom (its actually really cool, they give us loads of free food and prizes). There are also lots of informal community events organized by students, such as trips to the MET and afternoons in Central Park. In addition, we are also part of the NYU community as a whole, and as such get free admissions to tons of events and museums throughout the city.

One of the nicest aspects of the student community at NYUSoM is how the students support each other. Because our classes are small (102 per class) and most students live together in the NYUSoM Housing, the first-year class quickly becomes a tight-knit group. An example of this sense of community is how readily students share their study materials to help ensure we all do well. Before every exam, many students post their study guides or flashcard decks to our class Facebook page/GroupMe/slack channel (we have all three) for everyone to use. There is a sense that we're all in this together, and that we have to help each other along the way. Having a supportive community of students has been one of the most important factors in making my medical school experience so enjoyable and successful.

New York City:
New York City is a great place to be for medical school, and NYU’s location in Midtown is perfect for taking advantage of all NYC has to offer. NYU has three private hospitals, the country's premier public hospital in Bellevue (also where NBC's show New Amsterdam is filmed), and a government hospital all within easy walking distance of each other-serving all aspects of our diverse patient community. The city is an incredibly vibrant place. Whether you want to spend a sunny afternoon in Central Park, enter a lottery for discounted Broadway tickets, or explore the MET or the Museum of Natural History, there is always something exciting to do only a short subway ride away. You can also get any type of food you want at any time of day delivered right to your apartment, which is pretty amazing.

One great thing about New York is that, despite its size, it’s still a very safe place to live. Statistically, it’s the safest large city in the U.S., and after living here for a year, I have yet to experience a situation in which I felt unsafe.

I love the excitement of the city, but on those occasions on which I want to get away from the hustle and bustle, there are many tranquil corners of the city to explore. From Central Park to Riverside Park to the Cloisters, there are plenty of places to relax surrounded by nature.

At the end of the day, NYC has something for everyone, which is what makes it such a special place. I can’t think of any other place I would rather be in medical school.


Of note:
-NYU has a group of current students that function as ambassadors and are available to help with questions/admissions process in general:
-Email: [email protected]
-Link for ambassador profiles in case you want to contact someone with specific interests: MD Student Ambassador Program | NYU Langone Health
-Dean Rivera will hold several Twitter chats where you have an opportunity to ask him any questions @RafaelRiveraMD
Social media:
-IG: NYU School of Medicine (@nyuschoolofmed) • Instagram photos and videos
-Student NYUSoM IG: NYU School of Medicine (@nyusomadmissions) • Instagram photos and videos
-Twitter:NYU School of Med (@nyuschoolofmed) | Twitter
-Facebook:
NYU School of Medicine

Good luck everyone!
Is it worth applying if you have sub 518 MCAT and 3.9 GPA? Also, it seems that NYU is wanting to attract students who become the next research superstars. How would a person focused on the underserved and addressing health disparities fit in (so not focused on research as a long term goal)?
 

MemeLord

Spunky, Master of Sleeps
Feb 21, 2018
3,623
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Pre-Medical
Is it worth applying if you have sub 518 MCAT and 3.9 GPA? Also, it seems that NYU is wanting to attract students who will get into competitive specialities or become the next research superstars and . How would a person with an application and interest centered around addressing health disparities in primary care fit in?
NYU Long Island is your go-to
 
Dec 25, 2018
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NYU Long Island is your go-to
Huh didn't even know this existed. What if you are not sure what specialty you want to do? Would you recommend still applying?
 
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MemeLord

Spunky, Master of Sleeps
Feb 21, 2018
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Huh didn't even know this existed. What if you are not sure what specialty you want to do? Would you recommend still applying?
If you want to do Primary Care, NYU LI wil get you there regardless of PC specialty. Additionally, you can always do a fellowship if you change your mind about PC and want to go in to something more specialized (Endocrinology, neurosurge fellowship after gen surg residency etc).
 

texasvandy

2+ Year Member
Oct 21, 2014
175
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It was outside a specified degree plan - where I've completed my requirements they do have a post-bacc but I'm taking all the required courses without being in the official program since the program is significantly more expensive.

So in your opinion, since I took the courses outside of a post-bacc everything after college graduation would fall under this prompt?
Essentially, the schools are interested in finding out what you were doing with your time when you took a break during or after studies. So you account for the period since you graduated, including the time until you actually enroll (let us say 2020 July). There is nothing wrong with how you did it but you can't assume colleges know that was your plan by looking at your transcript if you were not enrolled in a different degree plan after graduation. Let us say someone applied 5 years after graduation, they worked 3 years, went back to school for a year to do requirements and take MCAT, and are now applying, they would explain that whole 5 year period.
 
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MemeLord

Spunky, Master of Sleeps
Feb 21, 2018
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"If you have taken any time off from your studies, either during or after college, please describe what you have done during this time and your reasons for doing so."

This is specifically asking if you took a break during school or after finishing college. Any time longer than a school break counts as a break. Technically you have been on a break since finishing college even if you were doing prerequisites if you were not in a post bac program and doing it on your own. For example, did you attend school full time for prerequisites but was this outside of a specified degree plan?
Silly question: Does this include time off between high school and undergrad?
 

MemeLord

Spunky, Master of Sleeps
Feb 21, 2018
3,623
3,381
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Pre-Medical
Not the way the question is phrased since it says "during or after college".
My first two years after high school were military service and those 2 years were jointly awarded credits at a university. So my time in between military service and actually starting at my university should be accounted for, right? Because I was technically a university student?
 

texasvandy

2+ Year Member
Oct 21, 2014
175
64
71
My first two years after high school were military service and those 2 years were jointly awarded credits at a university. So my time in between military service and actually starting at my university should be accounted for, right? Because I was technically a university student?
This is a complicated question. If you were awarded college credit for military service, then you were in college already in military. They should not be considered between high school and college.

Military service also counts for a lot in several medical schools. This would never be considered a gap.
 
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Apr 18, 2019
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Essentially, the schools are interested in finding out what you were doing with your time when you took a break during or after studies. So you account for the period since you graduated, including the time until you actually enroll (let us say 2020 July). There is nothing wrong with how you did it but you can't assume colleges know that was your plan by looking at your transcript if you were not enrolled in a different degree plan after graduation. Let us say someone applied 5 years after graduation, they worked 3 years, went back to school for a year to do requirements and take MCAT, and are now applying, they would explain that whole 5 year period.
Thanks, that helped clear things up :)
 
Aug 14, 2017
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Medical Student
Sorry about the delay in replies, I'm gonna try to answer everyone right now!

I had a question about the on-campus student housing. Do you know if the student housing is available to students who are married/have children? If not, are there subsidized options available for these students as well?

Edit: If there is a Non-trad/student with dependents that I can reach out to I would greatly appreciate it!
There is housing that is available for students who are married/have children. NYU does have other buildings where people live (residents, doctors, MD/PhD students, PhD students) that may be more suitable for families than Vilcek Hall. Keep in mind that for coupled/married housing, certain requirements must be met, which can be found here: https://med.nyu.edu/sites/default/files/couples-family-policy.pdf. Also, I don't know what the pricing will be like for this housing (Sorry I'm not too helpful on this question). You can reach out to our housing office at [email protected] to clarify, as I understand that this is a huge factor when applying/deciding medical schools. With that being said, a lot of the people in my class who are married or are engaged choose to live off campus, whether it be other parts of Manhattan or Brooklyn (which is super close to us and there is an NYU Langone ferry available to all NYU Langone staff/students).

@NYUAmbassadors This is probably a worthless question, but in your honest opinion, is it honestly even worth applying here? NYU was my top choice a few years ago before free tuition and now I feel like my GPA rules me out.

I'm not special in any way besides a long track record of service and a decent upward trend.
You'll never know if you don't try! If NYU was/is your top choice, I'd say give it a shot. While I understand that our median GPA is high, half of our class had a GPA above it and half of our class had a GPA below it. Additionally, there is a wide range of GPA's that make up our class. Not everyone here was a 4.0 student, and most of us do not think we are special in any way at all. It's about the breadth of experiences that you bring to the table, and what you may consider normal or not special may amaze people from other walks of life and fit in perfectly with the next class.

@NYUAmbassadors I know the secondaries for this cycle haven't been released yet, but had a question about this NYU prompt from last year:
"If you have taken any time off from your studies, either during or after college, please describe what you have done during this time and your reasons for doing so."

I'm non-trad and started my pre-med requirements right after college graduation. I finished them (except one semester physics) last fall semester 2018 and then took my MCAT this spring (no classes - just MCAT prep and my other commitments).

I haven't decided yet but may take that last semester of physics this summer or fall.

1) Would this spring when I was studying for MCAT be considered "taking time off from my studies"?
2) During this summer or fall, would the semester that I'm not taking classes be considered time off?
3) I will have finished all my classes this fall, and would take no classes next spring or summer (I'd hopefully be accepted by that point lol). Would next spring/summer need to be explained in this secondary?

Just not sure if this prompt applies to me and am loving what I've heard about NYUSoM so far. Thanks so much in advance!
I'm going to refrain from commenting on admissions essay prompts, especially not the current year, as I am not involved in the admissions application process and I do not want to give anyone incorrect information. Specific questions about prompts, especially in complicated situations as your own where clarification is needed, should be directed to our admissions office at [email protected] (sorry I can't be of more help here!).

Is it worth applying if you have sub 518 MCAT and 3.9 GPA? Also, it seems that NYU is wanting to attract students who become the next research superstars. How would a person focused on the underserved and addressing health disparities fit in (so not focused on research as a long term goal)?
In my opinion, it's completely worth it! You can find the range of GPA and MCAT scores in my class here MD Admissions Requirements | NYU Langone Health, and if anything about the school piqued your interest, its worth a shot! NYU accepts a wide array of students, and while some are research superstars, many, including myself, are not even close. I'm also more interested in focusing on underserved individuals and studying healthcare disparities, I can tell you that we have an amazing population health department and office of diversity and inclusion that both give us a great education (whether it be epidemiology lectures, healthcare systems/health insurance lectures to help us understand public vs private healthcare systems and the current state of health insurance, especially the affordable care act and where things were headed when it looked like it was going to be repealed last year, and panels featuring traditionally underserved populations and people in charge of making policy concerning them, such as mentally/physically impaired individuals, LQBTQ+ individuals, formerly incarcerated individuals and people recovering from alcohol and drug addiction all within our first year practice of medicine curriculum) and an opportunity to do research projects in these fields of study. You can find more information here: Department of Population Health | Department of Population Health!

In regards to the information about NYU Long Island, I'll start by saying that I do not know too much about it and I'm not involved with them at all. With that being said, our main campus does have a 3-year primary care program as well and many students who are interested in going into primary care fields. Not everyone at NYUSoM comes in wanting to or ends up going into a 'competitive' speciality, and with the location, array of hospitals, and the resources offered at NYUSoM you can genuinely do whatever you want to with your education during your time here.

I hope I was able to answer all of your questions adequately, and please feel free to ask follow-ups/clarifications/any more questions that you have and we'll do our best to get them answered!
 

MemeLord

Spunky, Master of Sleeps
Feb 21, 2018
3,623
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that may be more suitable for families than Vilcek Hall
Thank you for the reply about the housing. I did have a few follow up questions:

Is there something wrong with Vilcek hall?

Are other NYU properties frequently made available for students with children?

Do you know why students do choose to live off campus housing when the COL allowance is not enough to cover a 2 bedroom outside of on campus housing?

I have reached out to the housing office about on campus options! Thank you!
 
Aug 14, 2017
42
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Medical Student
Thank you for the reply about the housing. I did have a few follow up questions:

Is there something wrong with Vilcek hall?

Are other NYU properties frequently made available for students with children?

Do you know why students do choose to live off campus housing when the COL allowance is not enough to cover a 2 bedroom outside of on-campus housing?

I have reached out to the housing office about on-campus options! Thank you!
No there's nothing wrong with Vilcek Hall, I really love it! There is only one quad per floor, with the rest of the rooms being doubles and studios, which depending on how old/how many kids one has or wants, may make things kind of tight if you don't have a quad.

I'm not sure about your second question, but the administration and housing office are usually as accommodating as they can be, and they'll probably reply to you with more information on it.

At least in my class, the overwhelming majority of people live on campus, for convenience, cost, and to be around their friends and classmates. Some people have been living elsewhere in NYC prior to starting at NYU and decide to stay where they already live, other people like the independence of having a place off campus, and some people with spouses/significant others want to live somewhere that is in the middle of both of their jobs/schools.

Hope this helps clarify things and feel free to ask any more questions!
 
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MemeLord

Spunky, Master of Sleeps
Feb 21, 2018
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being doubles
Thank you again for the responses! Do you know if the doubles would be enough space for just a couple and one kid/if there is a precedent for students with families living on campus?

Sorry, the housing office only responds in one-sentence not-very-helpful emails :1LOL:
 
Aug 14, 2017
42
73
31
Status
Medical Student
Thank you again for the responses! Do you know if the doubles would be enough space for just a couple and one kid/if there is a precedent for students with families living on campus?

Sorry, the housing office only responds in one-sentence not-very-helpful emails :1LOL:
Sorry about the housing office not being too helpful 1:(. You can try emailing our admissions office at [email protected], as I'm sure they've received this question in the past and can better answer it than I can. I'm sure there is a precedent for students with families living on campus, there are just none in my class (the current first-year class), or yet at least. I wish I could be more helpful here, but hopefully, admissions can answer your questions. If not, feel free to message us/email us and I'll ask some upperclassmen if they know of anyone in a similar situation to yours.
 
Mar 21, 2019
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Pre-Medical
If I can't take CASPer until the 25th, will this delay or decrease my chances of getting a secondary or interview invitation? I'm applying for the MSTP
 

Bioch3mistry

2+ Year Member
Dec 5, 2015
8
7
11
Status
DO/PhD Student
@NYUAmbassadors

I'm interested in studying a foreign language in medical school with the hope of becoming fluent enough to help with translations when needed. Is there an elective option for this at NYU? I see that in the Family Medicine Elective there is a chance to practice Spanish, but I'm not sure what other resources there are available.

Thanks!
 
Aug 14, 2017
42
73
31
Status
Medical Student
@Bioch3mistry Thank you for the question! There are a lot of options at NYUSoM to help people become fluent in Spanish, especially medical Spanish. There is an optional medical Spanish course offered to first and second-year students. The beginner course, for people with very little Spanish speaking experience, was created and is run by students. There is also an intermediate and advanced level (which I don't know a whole bunch about since I was in the beginner one) for students with more experience, and I know they have a lot of Spanish speaking OSCEs (standardized patient interviews), which dually serves to help them practice their patient interviewing skills and learn medical Spanish. We also have an established immersive international health program with a hospital in Ecuador that students can participate in during the summer between first and second year, or during their fourth year in a global health selective. Moreover, all first-year students participate in our PLACE program, a program designed for us to shadow doctors in the ambulatory setting since most of our training is in a hospital setting (and medicine is shifting towards predominately ambulatory care). Before this program starts, you can choose to follow a physician who primarily sees spanish speaking populations to help you practice/learn medical Spanish. Finally, Bellevue hospital, one of our main hospitals and the oldest public hospital in the US serves a very large Spanish speaking population. You will encounter many of these patients while shadowing and during clerkship year, and if you already have some Spanish speaking experience, will going a long way towards helping you become fluent. I hope this helps, and let us know if you have any further questions!