2023-2024 New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM-Jonesboro)

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Withdrew my A here. Good luck everyone.

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Just want to give my 2 cents and few things to consider in retrospect for incoming students of 2028. This is mainly for students who haven’t excelled academically in the past. If you’ve always done well, you can ignore this:

26 students remediated (about 20% of the class) last year after a 2% overall curve and 3 didn’t pass remediation, but also those who re enter with the new class the following year will be in probation not only for fall, but for spring as well (aka if you fail anything you’re dismissed). You pay for remediation the following spring (32k I think) and for the cost of attendance the following repeat year, but the courses you’re repeating with the next years class are 50% of the original tuition. Most students take out 90-100k in loans for a year for tuition and living expenses.

For this class of 2027, I’m not sure what the curve will be like if there is one, but I know many in danger of not passing and having to remediate. So the number of 26 seems like it’s going to be repeated at the very least this year. Talking with the students who are repeating the year currently I can tell you it’s a stressful process and a long one. Forget about the money aspect or how it will affect your loans for the 5th yr, being in limbo for almost a year and a half after the first semester is rough. Most schools allow you to repeat a course the following semester or in the summer, but the way the curriculum is set up doesn’t allow for that. Also the claim is that it improves pass rates for step 1.

All in all the faculty are good and supportive if you reach out for help, but obviously the onus is on you to do what needs to be done to succeed and that’s how it is at any school. Just know the first semester is a learning curve for many especially if you havent been one of those high gpa or mcat individuals. Anyone can pass even if you come in with a low gpa or mcat, but if you have other similar American DO options, I would highly consider those options in order to save yourself the headache of having to potentially be held back a full year and everything else I mentioned that comes with it. Again this is my opinion and of some I know, but I want to be clear I’m not speaking for all.
Can I ask why you think many students are in remediation? Does the school not give enough resources wise, are faculty unhelpful, etc. or is it more of the difficult adjustment to medical school level academics?
 
Can I ask why you think many students are in remediation? Does the school not give enough resources wise, are faculty unhelpful, etc. or is it more of the difficult adjustment to medical school level academics?
I really don’t think the resources or faculty are lacking in comparison to other schools, so logically in my opinion it may be due to the nature/difficulty of the exams. Only having 3 comp exams with the last 25pct of your grade coming from pre comps that typically have a lower average than the comp which doesn’t help your grade but does help prepare you for the comp. I’m not sure of what other schools exact remediation rates are for first yrs, but near 20pct seems high.
 
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Withdrawing my A from here. I hope it goes to one of you wonderful people!
 
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That’s all hearsay. All students here get placed at sites. Quality varies, but you will have a site. There are sites in Northwest AR, Little Rock, AR, NEA Baptist (residency program) and St. Bernard’s (residency program) in Jonesboro, Memphis (Baptist - residency programs), Southaven, MS (another Baptist hospital - residency program), Tupelo, MS (residency program), Shreveport, LA (residency program), and smaller towns throughout AR. NYITCOM has no official partnership with these residency programs, but if you are at these sites you will rotate with them in certain specialties.

ARCOM is also on heightened monitoring for accreditation. NYITCOM was just approved, again, for full accreditation.

Just wanted to provide future students clarification, there are large and small hubs and there are rotation spots at all of these. However the nature of maintaining clinical rotation sites is ever changing. As a few third years have found out this year some sites and locations are more stable in there "permanence" than others. for example there are multiple specific rotations at specific sites during specific times of the year that have had to be shuffled around across the states due to lack of available contracted doctors at the site they were set at. Some students have also found out halfway through the semester that certain sites that were supposed to be taking them just won't be and are having to be shuffled to nearby (45 mins - 2hrs) sites. just going to reiterate that this is not a major problem but is something that can occur especially at smaller sites where something as simple as one physician opting out/ leaving can make this happen to students and requires understanding and a level of flexibility on the part of the student. Also lodging is provided if the site is greater than a certain distance from your main location.
 
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I apologize if this question has already been asked but can anyone give their input on NYIT vs ARCOM? Pros and Cons? Why would one person choose one over the other? I can’t find much information about the NYIT Arkansas campus from a student’s perspective on Reddit or SDN.
honestly my opinion would be that while the environment can really take some getting used to and requires good cohesion in your class I genuinely believe NYIT is the better option between the 2. and no I didn't drink the kool aide
1) We have not been on probationary status with COCA (a look at ARCOM shows they passed their accreditation now). however as a campus The Jonesboro campus is classed as an "additional location" by COCA for the sake of accreditation. the current guidelines and rules about COCA stipulate that an additional location reports to COCA " as a combined cohort for all sites as a singular COM" This means that our accreditation is NOT SEPERATE from the New York campus for COCA purposes. This is a double edged sword in many ways.
2) There is a lot of notoriety in the NYITCOM name throughout the North East, and may of our alumni from both campuses have laid an extensive network of opportunity for many students across all specialties. Many of my 4th year friends doing interview now have laughed at how many times the PD/ interview panel doesn't understand how they were in school in NY yet were also doing so much in Arkansas.
3) While the "stats" of the schools. performance (board pass rates, match rate, attrition rate) can certainly be quesitoned, the fact is that for the vast majority you are going to match, you will get a residency, most students will pass boards, and the curriculum will prepare you to be a great physician. In fact the Professionalism committee for students that fail or need to remediate have actively embraced that the curriculum is not taught to the boards and is instead taught to prepare us more for years 3 and 4. all that to still say, there are going to be accounts of "I didn't get this", "this bad thing happened", "I submitted my ERAS too late and couldn't match" etc.

TLDR: NYIT will teach you everything you need and you will make yourself a doctor with their help. Ultimately you have to piece through all the information out there and determine what you make of the data, what you are willing to accept, and how hard you are willing to work for your choice that you pick.

 
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Can I ask why you think many students are in remediation? Does the school not give enough resources wise, are faculty unhelpful, etc. or is it more of the difficult adjustment to medical school level academics?
Many students get a reality check on that first pre-comp in regards to the expectations of medical school regarding studying/knowledge/testing. some do well but most are humbled and if you cannot make a comeback in 1-2 weeks then it makes the next two blocks that much harder. especially with the uncertainty that lies in how exams are curved/questions dropped (your grade may go up or it may go down depending on if you got the questions dropped right or wrong)
 
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honestly my opinion would be that while the environment can really take some getting used to and requires good cohesion in your class I genuinely believe NYIT is the better option between the 2. and no I didn't drink the kool aide
1) We have not been on probationary status with COCA (a look at ARCOM shows they passed their accreditation now). however as a campus The Jonesboro campus is classed as an "additional location" by COCA for the sake of accreditation. the current guidelines and rules about COCA stipulate that an additional location reports to COCA " as a combined cohort for all sites as a singular COM" This means that our accreditation is NOT SEPERATE from the New York campus for COCA purposes. This is a double edged sword in many ways.
2) There is a lot of notoriety in the NYITCOM name throughout the North East, and may of our alumni from both campuses have laid an extensive network of opportunity for many students across all specialties. Many of my 4th year friends doing interview now have laughed at how many times the PD/ interview panel doesn't understand how they were in school in NY yet were also doing so much in Arkansas.
3) While the "stats" of the schools. performance (board pass rates, match rate, attrition rate) can certainly be quesitoned, the fact is that for the vast majority you are going to match, you will get a residency, most students will pass boards, and the curriculum will prepare you to be a great physician. In fact the Professionalism committee for students that fail or need to remediate have actively embraced that the curriculum is not taught to the boards and is instead taught to prepare us more for years 3 and 4. all that to still say, there are going to be accounts of "I didn't get this", "this bad thing happened", "I submitted my ERAS too late and couldn't match" etc.

TLDR: NYIT will teach you everything you need and you will make yourself a doctor with their help. Ultimately you have to piece through all the information out there and determine what you make of the data, what you are willing to accept, and how hard you are willing to work for your choice that you pick.

Thank you so much for all of your information, it’s incredibly helpful, even as someone who will most likely be attending the NYIT’s NY campus. But in regard to “the curriculum is not taught to the boards” and being more to prepare you for years 3 and 4, does that make studying for the boards more difficult or an independent task in comparison to other schools?
 
Thank you so much for all of your information, it’s incredibly helpful, even as someone who will most likely be attending the NYIT’s NY campus. But in regard to “the curriculum is not taught to the boards” and being more to prepare you for years 3 and 4, does that make studying for the boards more difficult or an independent task in comparison to other schools?
I wouldn't say that it makes studying for boards harder as it's the same information you've already learned. it's just that in the curriculum you will go into a little bit more nitty-gritty detail than a lot of other first and second year medical school students. Exams tend to be very specifically focused on questions and test items that are not commonly board relevant. There are also quite a few courses that come up that are very Specific to the faculty interest. Some good examples of this are certain lectures about gun control, a whole q and a session with a lawyer about transplant law and a lot of the policy and outlook for it, and some extremely in depth lectures that go into our research faculties particular area of interest (ie. the faculty does research into ENAC channels so you learn a crap ton about it, get tested about the minor details of it etc)

The biggest factor for being ready for boards really just comes down to if you're able to sit down and do the work during dedicated. This is true of most medical schools, and is why students get dedicated. Some have longer dedicated times of 2-3 months while others may only have 4 weeks depending on the school.

That being said a large portion of students don't usually sit for level one in the summer "on time" and push it out to either after July course or anytime during third year. At the start of this year there were roughly 40-50% that had not taken level 1 in the third year class and maybe 10 or so in the second year class. Fast forward to today and it's maybe 10 or so in the third year and a 1 or 2 of the fourth years who haven't sat for level 1. Currently to my knowledge only one person from the third year class, and 10 of the fourth year class failed level 1 as of December.
 
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I wouldn't say that it makes studying for boards harder as it's the same information you've already learned. it's just that in the curriculum you will go into a little bit more nitty-gritty detail than a lot of other first and second year medical school students. Exams tend to be very specifically focused on questions and test items that are not commonly board relevant. There are also quite a few courses that come up that are very Specific to the faculty interest. Some good examples of this are certain lectures about gun control, a whole q and a session with a lawyer about transplant law and a lot of the policy and outlook for it, and some extremely in depth lectures that go into our research faculties particular area of interest (ie. the faculty does research into ENAC channels so you learn a crap ton about it, get tested about the minor details of it etc)

The biggest factor for being ready for boards really just comes down to if you're able to sit down and do the work during dedicated. This is true of most medical schools, and is why students get dedicated. Some have longer dedicated times of 2-3 months while others may only have 4 weeks depending on the school.

That being said a large portion of students don't usually sit for level one in the summer "on time" and push it out to either after July course or anytime during third year. At the start of this year there were roughly 40-50% that had not taken level 1 in the third year class and maybe 10 or so in the second year class. Fast forward to today and it's maybe 10 or so in the third year and a 1 or 2 of the fourth years who haven't sat for level 1. Currently to my knowledge only one person from the third year class, and 10 of the fourth year class failed level 1 as of December.
Thank you so so much!!!
 
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Just want to give my 2 cents and few things to consider in retrospect for incoming students of 2028. This is mainly for students who haven’t excelled academically in the past. If you’ve always done well, you can ignore this:

26 students remediated (about 20% of the class) last year after a 2% overall curve and 3 didn’t pass remediation, but also those who re enter with the new class the following year will be in probation not only for fall, but for spring as well (aka if you fail anything you’re dismissed). You pay for remediation the following spring (32k I think) and for the cost of attendance the following repeat year, but the courses you’re repeating with the next years class are 50% of the original tuition. Most students take out 90-100k in loans for a year for tuition and living expenses.

For this class of 2027, I’m not sure what the curve will be like if there is one, but I know many in danger of not passing and having to remediate. So the number of 26 seems like it’s going to be repeated at the very least this year. Talking with the students who are repeating the year currently I can tell you it’s a stressful process and a long one. Forget about the money aspect or how it will affect your loans for the 5th yr, being in limbo for almost a year and a half after the first semester is rough. Most schools allow you to repeat a course the following semester or in the summer, but the way the curriculum is set up doesn’t allow for that. Also the claim is that it improves pass rates for step 1.

All in all the faculty are good and supportive if you reach out for help, but obviously the onus is on you to do what needs to be done to succeed and that’s how it is at any school. Just know the first semester is a learning curve for many especially if you havent been one of those high gpa or mcat individuals. Anyone can pass even if you come in with a low gpa or mcat, but if you have other similar American DO options, I would highly consider those options in order to save yourself the headache of having to potentially be held back a full year and everything else I mentioned that comes with it. Again this is my opinion and of some I know, but I want to be clear I’m not speaking for all.

I am a first year here as well and I agree everything w this post except for a couple. Im making a second acct as I talked w the same students on here rn and they literally said the same things to me last year about rotations and cirriculum. Im coming on here to share my experience as I literally was in the same shoes as many of you last year.

1. its not about "if you score well ignore this" a good chunk of my classmates have scored high on the MCAT and got 3.8-4.0s and are at risk for remediation rn. These people are bright and smart. Med school is a beast and some schools will make your life easier while others wont. Here if you fail a block, your grade goes down alot which is what is happening to alot of folks rn.

Its not about people who need to repeat are academically poor. Its the way our scoring is done where 3 exams determine your avg so even if you **** up one (Which happens) your avg goes down. Other schools let you retake exams (KCU,DMU,PCOM) here everything is handed down to one person instead of the deans which has been creating issues.

2. Faculty ARE levaing for the new school in memphis. I can name 2 who are leaving this semester (one is going 4 the commute). in additon, the baptist partnership might end idk how that will pan out. The anatomy faculty are GODSENT. Even better than the NY ppl.

3. The people here are amazing! I met some great folks in ARK which has made this journey better.

4. NYC is the headmaster. They decide everything if you want change you have to lobby w the NY ppl as they have final say in everything including our campus. One thing that students on here didn't mention is that curve that was given. The NYC dean decided that to save face.

5. in terms of remediation they said that the class of 2023/2024 had students failing STEP 1/COMLEX so they made that weak correlation to make student stay back a year?? idk either way if you come here you will be fine but make the decisions for yourselves.
 
I am a first year here as well and I agree everything w this post except for a couple. Im making a second acct as I talked w the same students on here rn and they literally said the same things to me last year about rotations and cirriculum. Im coming on here to share my experience as I literally was in the same shoes as many of you last year.

1. its not about "if you score well ignore this" a good chunk of my classmates have scored high on the MCAT and got 3.8-4.0s and are at risk for remediation rn. These people are bright and smart. Med school is a beast and some schools will make your life easier while others wont. Here if you fail a block, your grade goes down alot which is what is happening to alot of folks rn.

Its not about people who need to repeat are academically poor. Its the way our scoring is done where 3 exams determine your avg so even if you **** up one (Which happens) your avg goes down. Other schools let you retake exams (KCU,DMU,PCOM) here everything is handed down to one person instead of the deans which has been creating issues.

2. Faculty ARE levaing for the new school in memphis. I can name 2 who are leaving this semester (one is going 4 the commute). in additon, the baptist partnership might end idk how that will pan out. The anatomy faculty are GODSENT. Even better than the NY ppl.

3. The people here are amazing! I met some great folks in ARK which has made this journey better.

4. NYC is the headmaster. They decide everything if you want change you have to lobby w the NY ppl as they have final say in everything including our campus. One thing that students on here didn't mention is that curve that was given. The NYC dean decided that to save face.

5. in terms of remediation they said that the class of 2023/2024 had students failing STEP 1/COMLEX so they made that weak correlation to make student stay back a year?? idk either way if you come here you will be fine but make the decisions for yourselves.
Agree with most all this.

The Baptist partnership is not ending anytime soon. That’s straight from Dr. Speights.

One of the faculty members leaving for the Baptist school in Memphis has been living in Memphis and making the commute to Jonesboro so that one makes sense. The others leaving, seems to be a growing concern.

There was a 2% curve given at the end of FOM last year for those students. It was supposedly the first time it had ever happened and it saved a lot of the class.

2023/2024 class was a covid class and had trouble passing board exams because they were able to skate through the curriculum due to being able to do everything from home.
 
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I know everyone's concerned about students remediating, but let me tell y'all this: most of the time, failure is due to the student and not the test questions itself. If lots of people get the question wrong (more than half the class), or more than 90% get the question right, they toss the exam question out - which is done to standardize the test scores like most medical schools do. Our exam questions are fair for the most part, w/ 7-9 randomly specific questions (out of 125 questions) that can be answered IF you actually watch the lectures and do scholarRX practice questions - which is where all test questions come from - NOT outside sources like sketchy, first aid, etc. Honestly, if you can't pass the exams at NYIT, you wouldn't pass exams at any medical school in the US or outside the US. Bear in mind that our pre-clinical COMPS (Exams) and Anatomy exams are the same exact ones from the NY campus. The only true difference comes from DPR lab practicals, OMM practicals, and clinical rotations because it's based on the individual grader. Not to be rude, but people from the South (demographics of the JB campus) are not as smart as the people from the NY campus and DO students aren't academically stronger than USMD students - hence a greater chance for lower scores.

Most of these people who fail either had a really hard time adjusting to med school, have learning disabilities, procrastinate, don't change their learning habits when they fail, have life problems, or are people who shouldn't even be in med school. It's not one of the best med schools (in terms of tuition cost, location, prestige, research opportunities, connections) but most certainly better than some others.
 
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I know everyone's concerned about students remediating, but let me tell y'all this: most of the time, failure is due to the student and not the test questions itself. If lots of people get the question wrong (more than half the class), or more than 90% get the question right, they toss the exam question out - which is done to standardize the test scores like most medical schools do. Our exam questions are fair for the most part, w/ 7-9 randomly specific questions (out of 125 questions) that can be answered IF you actually watch the lectures and do scholarRX practice questions - which is where all test questions come from - NOT outside sources like sketchy, first aid, etc. Honestly, if you can't pass the exams at NYIT, you wouldn't pass exams at any medical school in the US or outside the US. Bear in mind that our pre-clinical COMPS (Exams) and Anatomy exams are the same exact ones from the NY campus. The only true difference comes from DPR lab practicals, OMM practicals, and clinical rotations because it's based on the individual grader. Not to be rude, but people from the South (demographics of the JB campus) are not as smart as the people from the NY campus and DO students aren't academically stronger than USMD students - hence a greater chance for lower scores.

Most of these people who fail either had a really hard time adjusting to med school, have learning disabilities, procrastinate, don't change their learning habits when they fail, have life problems, or are people who shouldn't even be in med school. It's not one of the best med schools (in terms of tuition cost, location, prestige, research opportunities, connections) but most certainly better than some others.
I agree with some as you made valid points but disagree w some:

1. The whole demographics debate is kinda wack and overrun imo. I think your a second/third year student (if you are the upperclassman had completely different curriculum set ups that what we have now) but we got to take a look with the AA this semster there is a good mix of students who are high performers just like NYC. I do agree that some students have lower stats but a majority dont. PPl here have strong academic backgrounds.

2. Failure and Remediations IS NOT ALL on the students. I have seen this first hand. I have met remediates this year at both campuses. Yes some have had a hard time adjusting and made mistakes. I def agree with that some remediates needed that extra boost, yes some needed to take time off etc that i agree with. However its definitely the way our curriculum is run that has been pushing alot of student into remediation a good chunk are smart and hard working they passed comps before. that narrative is also old and not relevant esp for the newer 3 comp curriculum. If NYC is the "better school" why did 46 students fail at their campus last year? Why did NYC have a higher attrition/drop out rate? Why is there currently around 25ish% students failing (NYC alone not including JB)? Im not making this up go on reddit, go on discord you can see for yourself what the NYC "smarter" students are saying. Also what medical school (MD/DO) has consistently had 15% of their class repeat (after the curve)? It cant all be the students fault.

Only like 3/125 questions come from SchoalrRX lmao what exams are yall taking that come straight from scholarRX cuz lmk. They do come from lecture so things are fair game. i do def agree with you that med school is hard, our exams are fair, its just the way the curriculum and policies are set up that make it easy for students to slip through the cracks. ex: I know 2 students who performed well on block one, failed block 2 (it was hard) , passed block 3 and still need to remediate.

I still think this school is better than the other DO programs out there we have a great match both NYC/JB. Just be ready to know there is no cushion for failure in ur first sem here
 
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Only like 3/125 questions come from SchoalrRX lmao what exams are yall taking that come straight from scholarRX cuz lmk.
Go look at your examsoft breakdown. A decent amount come from scholarRx, especially in the PPOMs. They are usually adapted questions from Qmax questions. They are fair game because they are mandatory resources alongside the lectures.
 
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There’s obviously a lot of debate about testing policies and such. Not much we can do about that. So, from any one who is doing well there now, what’re you doing and how are you studying to have done so well?
 
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There’s obviously a lot of debate about testing policies and such. Not much we can do about that. So, from any one who is doing well there now, what’re you doing and how are you studying to have done so well?
You will get a different answer from everyone you ask. We all study in different ways. The best advice I can give you is to stay on top of all the lectures and actively review the materials as you go. Once you start, you will be paired with a second year student as your mentor and they can give you more specifics, or anyone else you see around campus. One of the best things about the school is that the classes are close-knit and very helpful to their classmates.
 
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Just as an FYI it seems the Jonesboro campus will have more than 26 students remediating. An increase from last year. Again, a lot of factors besides the test questions can account for students underperforming.
 
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I'm having a hard time understanding how various students have said "exams are fair" "questions come from lectures or practice questions" but in the same breath, the curriculum is unfair? If exams are coming from lectures, ScholarRX, and a test bank, what's unfair?
 
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I'm having a hard time understanding how various students have said "exams are fair" "questions come from lectures or practice questions" but in the same breath, the curriculum is unfair? If exams are coming from lectures, ScholarRX, and a test bank, what's unfair?
Bc a few students are immature and feel exams are 'unfair' when they don't do well. They are stuck in their ways and refuse to adapt to the system bc of what they've read on reddit, sdn etc about how to pass exams instead of tailoring their learning to in-house exams for their school. Not to mention we get to see all questions (right and wrong) AND the correct answer with an explanation immediately after we take the exam. Also they tend to use the same questions from pre-comps on the actual comps.

Ngl we've had some immature students this year that makes this campus look bad. A lot my friends have said they skip the ScholarRX bc it's either too hard or it doesn't pertain to what we are learning, even tho it's mandatory. We've had a bunch students not show up to their second patient encounter bc they didn't read the excel sheet stating which day and time they were scheduled. We've had people show up in lay clothes for presentations when the dress code explicitly states business casual +white coat. Also, there were complaints that some students wanted to keep the test questions and answers after the review period we are given immediately after the exam - which you can't do bc it's an exam.

Edit: These types of students are not exclusive to our school. They are found in every med school nationwide.
 
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They are stuck in their ways and refuse to adapt to the system bc of what they've read on reddit, sdn etc about how to pass exams instead of tailoring their learning to in-house exams for their school
What is different from how online premed blogs advise med school studying versus what is required of NYITCOM students? Is it to not be so reliant on studying for exams the way you'd study for boards?
 
Bc a few students are immature and feel exams are 'unfair' when they don't do well. They are stuck in their ways and refuse to adapt to the system bc of what they've read on reddit, sdn etc about how to pass exams instead of tailoring their learning to in-house exams for their school. Not to mention we get to see all questions (right and wrong) AND the correct answer with an explanation immediately after we take the exam. Also they tend to use the same questions from pre-comps on the actual comps.

Ngl we've had some immature students this year that makes this campus look bad. A lot my friends have said they skip the ScholarRX bc it's either too hard or it doesn't pertain to what we are learning, even tho it's mandatory. We've had a bunch students not show up to their second patient encounter bc they didn't read the excel sheet stating which day and time they were scheduled. We've had people show up in lay clothes for presentations when the dress code explicitly states business casual +white coat. Also, there were complaints that some students wanted to keep the test questions and answers after the review period we are given immediately after the exam - which you can't do bc it's an exam.

Edit: These types of students are not exclusive to our school. They are found in every med school nationwide.
Spot on. The biggest issue is everything combined into 1 course with only 3-4 major exams (nothing we can do about that - adapt) combined with students that do not realize medical school is a professional** school. Your new job is to study and do well in school, nothing else, unless you are efficient enough to allow time for those things after adequately taking care of school.
 
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Nobody ever said the exams were unfair so not sure where that’s coming from. People have concerns based on the number of people in remediation and trying to understand why and what’s different from what’s happening here versus another school and if they should come to this school or not.
 
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Nobody ever said the exams were unfair so not sure where that’s coming from. People have concerns based on the number of people in remediation and trying to understand why and what’s different from what’s happening here versus another school and if they should come to this school or not.
3 (FOM, PPOM 2, PPOM 3) - 4 (PPOM1) exams carrying 75% of overall grade and only 1 course per semester. There is no room for error. There is your answer.

Most schools have more exams or multiple classes per semester so you can do poorly a few times and recover or remediate a specific exam or course and still move on. You cannot do that at NYITCOM because of the 1 course setup. If other schools had the same setup, remediation rates would be higher at those schools as well. The reason more students remediate at the AR campus vs the NY campus is likely due to the quality of the students.
 
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Just as an aside, FOM is the only course where failure requires repeating the first year. All other courses are remediated in June and you move on with your class if you are successful in remediation, which almost everyone is.

Most people do not ever need to remediate a course either. There is always going to be some reporting bias when it comes to complaints against a school. Sure, it is definitely something to consider if you have multiple options, but if this is your only acceptance do not let it scare you away. Be prepared to work hard and succeed.
 
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Did anyone receive an email back after sending in their MMR vaccination proof?
 
Just wanted to provide future students clarification, there are large and small hubs and there are rotation spots at all of these. However the nature of maintaining clinical rotation sites is ever changing. As a few third years have found out this year some sites and locations are more stable in there "permanence" than others. for example there are multiple specific rotations at specific sites during specific times of the year that have had to be shuffled around across the states due to lack of available contracted doctors at the site they were set at. Some students have also found out halfway through the semester that certain sites that were supposed to be taking them just won't be and are having to be shuffled to nearby (45 mins - 2hrs) sites. just going to reiterate that this is not a major problem but is something that can occur especially at smaller sites where something as simple as one physician opting out/ leaving can make this happen to students and requires understanding and a level of flexibility on the part of the student. Also lodging is provided if the site is greater than a certain distance from your main location.
It is easy to say it is not a major problem unless you are the one who's schedule has gotten changed and are suddenly commuting 2hrs a day to Osceola in a vehicle that is giving you trouble.
 
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I just withdrew my A. Interviewed 10/6, accepted 11/15. My original deposit date was 12/14, but they pushed it to 1/9 for me. So don't be afraid to ask for a deposit deadline extension, because they seemed to be very generous and allowed me to pick the new deadline date! The reasoning was: I wanted to attend accepted students' day before deciding.

OOS LM 68.5. Have other acceptances for DO like DMU and waiting on a few MD II results so that is why I withdrew. Hope my seat goes to one of you!
 
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Bc a few students are immature and feel exams are 'unfair' when they don't do well. They are stuck in their ways and refuse to adapt to the system bc of what they've read on reddit, sdn etc about how to pass exams instead of tailoring their learning to in-house exams for their school. Not to mention we get to see all questions (right and wrong) AND the correct answer with an explanation immediately after we take the exam. Also they tend to use the same questions from pre-comps on the actual comps.

Ngl we've had some immature students this year that makes this campus look bad. A lot my friends have said they skip the ScholarRX bc it's either too hard or it doesn't pertain to what we are learning, even tho it's mandatory. We've had a bunch students not show up to their second patient encounter bc they didn't read the excel sheet stating which day and time they were scheduled. We've had people show up in lay clothes for presentations when the dress code explicitly states business casual +white coat. Also, there were complaints that some students wanted to keep the test questions and answers after the review period we are given immediately after the exam - which you can't do bc it's an exam.

Edit: These types of students are not exclusive to our school. They are found in every med school nationwide.
I figured I would chime in about this and provide some perspective. I agree 100% with you that every student is the maker of their own path/grade/destiny. While I would argue that the curriculum could still use some continued improvement and greater cohesiveness at the jonesboro campus I would also point out that from a curriculum standpoint there are still discrepancies between campuses that are slowly being addressed. the NY campus has been very receptive to feedback from students. (only students who speak up in the schools surveys are really going to be heard by NY). its just bureaucracy and takes a long time.

Speaking strictly on exams; the questions, review, and content are all reasonable and found either in the lecture ppt, the lecture audio, or in the Scholar RX bricks associated with each lecture (some questions are even the same).

The areas where exam taking falls short start with the lack of variability in the questions. There is currently a document from 2014 with exam questions from comps, and pre comps of first year. 60-70% of those questions are still verbatim on exams from the faculty that have been with the school, and many new lectures simply present the same slides as the previous faculty and use their same questions. This has led many to believe that there is a very limited or even non-existent pool of questions for each comp/ series of lectures. (many exam mistakes have become running jokes between upper classman and 1st and 2nd years.

This idea of a limited question pool is further supported by the schools method of providing make up exams. Students this year pursuing surgery and other competitive specialties had poster presentations, and other forms of research presentation. This was cleared with the school well in advance (months) all students in attendance received a make up exam the following week that was identical to the one given to the main class. the only difference with this exam is that 25 (1/5) questions are free response. These free response questions were not changed from the main exam, instead they simply removed the answer choices and added a space to write your own text. many of these students are typically in the top quartile of our scores (80s-90s). However of the students that took the makeup exam only one passed, and the average was a 64 (14 points lower than the main class average of 78). This makeup exam also only got 4 questions dropped compared to the 8 that were dropped for the main class. Administrations commentary on their current process is that it is done to alleviate academic dishonesty where one student could tell those taking the makeup exam the answers. (this didn't make sense given the questions do not change, and other MC questions could be used to keep it fair we voiced this concern and were followed up with "just do better on the next one")

The final issue that many of us have with the exam is the method of standardizing/curving/dropping questions. Currently the way that it has been explained to us is that questions are dropped only if there is a serious error (missing an Xray, or missing text, or two of the same right answer, etc) or if "enough" of the top students miss that question. this means you will lose points on your exam if you correctly marked a question that the top students miss. This makes the raw score you see at the end of the exam a ball park estimate as you may go up a whole letter grade or possibly down 3-4 points depending on the number of dropped questions. We all feel that it makes no sense for ones grade to drop because of badly written questions, or errors in the exam (missing x-ray, two of the same correct answer choice), but this is always met with administrations statement of "come talk to me in my office" this usually leads to a conversation about just "focusing on the next exam" "this is a rare case" "we'll look at it if we have to at the end of the year". Just remember to always double back and get confirmation of everything that was said in an email as students have been in a pickle for this exact situation and were told "I never said that". so YMMV

But once again I will reiterate if you study the lectures, and supplement what you cannot grasp from the lectures then you can pass. As of today I and many others are proof of that.
 
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Posted by @premed_15 in the Old Westbury thread and figured some of you may find it useful.

“Just wanted to put this out there about the April 15 payment: this is what fin aid said to me this morning! They also said that if you’re paying out of pocket/payment plan, as long as you withdraw BEFORE the first day of classes you’ll receive a 100% refund so if you get off a waitlist or something like that you’re good to get the money back from the beginning of your payment plan (the $1500 deposit is nonrefundable nonnegotiable)”
 

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Just wanted to confirm. Federal student loans are available to students at the Arkansas campus correct?
 
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Complete early December and silence since then. It’s been more than 6 weeks, should I reach out to admissions?
 
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