Mar 6, 2018
974
1,223
41
Status
Pre-Medical
I received the email too. Anyone know if it went to all applicants on AMCAS, just those who applied to NYU, or just those who had interviews? Just trying to figure out how many applicants for the new program they will get.
Currently on WL and no interview received
 
Sep 18, 2018
35
74
31
did anyone find out more info about the WL? Is it ranked, or split into priority tiers? How big is it?
 
Oct 17, 2018
458
836
41
New England
Status
Attending Physician
Any clues on when we might start hearing about wait list movement. Will it be May 1st?
I expect there will not be much WL movement for NYU until April 15th, when top students SHOULD release all but 3 of their acceptances. The students already accepted at NYU will likely receive many offers of admission, including from UCSF, Stanford, Mayo, Columbia, Penn, Cornell, Harvard, Yale, Duke, Vandy, Johns Hopkins, etc. Many will hold onto most of their spots until after second looks, and until they get their financial aid packages. Even though NYU is tuition-free, it may actually be less expensive for people to go to other schools, if they get high aid that takes into account COL, or if they get generous merit aid. And NYC is not for everybody - so others may choose other schools for geographic reasons.

I do think that most of the people accepted to NYU will be accepted to more than 3 schools, so there will be a good amount of movement on April 15th.

Expect some additional movement after May 1, when these lucky students must go down to 1 school.
 
Last edited:
May 13, 2017
46
43
21
Status
Pre-Medical
I expect there will not be much WL movement for NYU until April 15th, when top students must release all but 3 of their acceptances. The students already accepted at NYU will likely receive many offers of admission, including from UCSF, Stanford, Mayo, Columbia, Penn, Cornell, Harvard, Yale, Duke, Vandy, Johns Hopkins, etc. Many will hold onto most of their spots until after second looks, and until they get their financial aid packages. Even though NYU is tuition-free, it may actually be less expensive for people to go to other schools, if they get high aid that takes into account COL, or if they get generous merit aid. And NYC is not for everybody - so others may choose other schools for geographic reasons.

I do think that most of the people accepted to NYU will be accepted to more than 3 schools, so there will be a good amount of movement on April 15th.

Expect some additional movement after May 1, when these lucky students must go down to 1 school.

Anecdotal n=1 here but I got accepted at NYU and big fat R’s from pretty much every other school on that list. It’s possible with the free tuition/smaller class, NYU’s selecting a more specific type of applicant? Either that or I just got super lucky at NYU...
 
Dec 20, 2018
345
634
41
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Anecdotal n=1 here but I got accepted at NYU and big fat R’s from pretty much every other school on that list. It’s possible with the free tuition/smaller class, NYU’s selecting a more specific type of applicant? Either that or I just got super lucky at NYU...
It happens. Saw a Reddit post a while ago about a guy who had literally 0 interviews except one from HMS in November. I think with uber-competitive schools like NYU was this cycle, they can take more “risks” with their acceptances/interviewees since they have such a wide pool of talent to select from.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lakertodoc
Oct 17, 2018
458
836
41
New England
Status
Attending Physician
Anecdotal n=1 here but I got accepted at NYU and big fat R’s from pretty much every other school on that list. It’s possible with the free tuition/smaller class, NYU’s selecting a more specific type of applicant? Either that or I just got super lucky at NYU...
With your LizzyM score though, I am not surprised by NYU acceptance. They like very high scoring applicants. Some of the other schools may be a bit more flexible on high high stats - if the student has a lot of other things going for them. And NYU will admit some students with great stories, but lower stats, but then they need to accept 6 more students with high stats to make up for them. I think they were tied with highest MCAT score last year?
 
Mar 17, 2018
825
1,242
41
www.mdapplicants.com
Status
Medical Student
Anecdotal n=1 here but I got accepted at NYU and big fat R’s from pretty much every other school on that list. It’s possible with the free tuition/smaller class, NYU’s selecting a more specific type of applicant? Either that or I just got super lucky at NYU...
Didn't you have a 528 though lol
 
Dec 20, 2018
345
634
41
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
With your LizzyM score though, I am not surprised by NYU acceptance. They like very high scoring applicants. Some of the other schools may be a bit more flexible on high high stats - if the student has a lot of other things going for them. And NYU will admit some students with great stories, but lower stats, but then they need to accept 6 more students with high stats to make up for them. I think they were tied with highest MCAT score last year?
Tbf I think that was a 3-way tie with WashU and Yale (and maybe also Penn?) and considering he didn’t get into any of those schools, stats don’t paint the whole picture here.
 
Jun 11, 2018
16
28
71
While I recieved 10+ interviews, I ultimately only had 6 of them from top 20 including NYU. My MCAT was also below their mean and not a 520 either. I don't think they are as stat heavy this year as people predict, or that waitlist movement will be as tremendous as people are projecting. I expect there to be a few people moving, but from conversations with other fellow accepted applicants to NYU, I think that the location, increasing trajectory in terms of prestige and scores, and free tuition will do it for the overwhelming majority of people.
 
Sep 18, 2018
35
74
31
A lot of it depends on competing merit aid from other schools to combat NYU's free tuition.
 

boundlesscorpuscle

MD Class of 2023!
Aug 9, 2018
144
163
41
Florida
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Are there any factors that would make those here not choose NYU? Like others have mentioned, I think only significant merit/need-based aid at other top schools would sway your average applicant.
 
May 22, 2018
190
267
41
Status
Pre-Medical
Are there any factors that would make those here not choose NYU? Like others have mentioned, I think only significant merit/need-based aid at other top schools would sway your average applicant.
I suppose if people find themselves unable to stomach the idea of living in Manhattan, that may do it. The city is a great place, but it definitely isn’t for everyone!
 
Mar 6, 2018
974
1,223
41
Status
Pre-Medical
Are there any factors that would make those here not choose NYU? Like others have mentioned, I think only significant merit/need-based aid at other top schools would sway your average applicant.
There are also the students with rich parents paying everything who may like california weather or some of the other T10s a little better than NYU and not care about the cost difference. 50% of MD matriculants come from families in the top 20% of U.S. incomes.
 

Newyawk

2+ Year Member
Sep 30, 2016
657
1,196
81
Status
Medical Student
There are also the students with rich parents paying everything who may like california weather or some of the other T10s a little better than NYU and not care about the cost difference. 50% of MD matriculants come from families in the top 20% of U.S. incomes.
Just curious to know if this is limited to med school bc i would think this probably correlates well with many other professional fields like law and business. Also, that stat isnt even that crazy. Without doing any research into it myself, i would venture to say that this is actually evidence of social mobility in the US.
Finally, 20% of the highest income families in the US is not that much money. The overwhelming majority of these people will not be able to pay for their childs tuition. I know families in the 1% who cannot just throw money at tuition. It may be surprising to some that qualifying for the 1% of america isnt extremely difficult in terms of income.
 
Mar 6, 2018
974
1,223
41
Status
Pre-Medical
Just curious to know if this is limited to med school bc i would think this probably correlates well with many other professional fields like law and business. Also, that stat isnt even that crazy. Without doing any research into it myself, i would venture to say that this is actually evidence of social mobility in the US.
Finally, 20% of the highest income families in the US is not that much money. The overwhelming majority of these people will not be able to pay for their childs tuition. I know families in the 1% who cannot just throw money at tuition. It may be surprising to some that qualifying for the 1% of america isnt extremely difficult in terms of income.
I can't speak for other professional fields but to me that statistic is rather surprising and disheartening because I believe (believed?) that our system of creating physicians has become extremely meritocratic, a bastion almost for other fields to strive towards; however seeing that half still come from the upper echelon of SES makes me worry there's still a lot of progress to be made and also that other fields suffer from even worse disparities without all the "safeguards" in place that we have in medicine to increase access to low income aspirants.

As for what you're saying about paying for tuition, I definitely agree. I believe that top 20% of income correlates to ~$150,000+ gross family income. I would not expect the vast majority of families with $150,000 income to be able to shell out $80k a year for their child's full COA, so I'm definitely not saying that 50% of applicants would fall under the category of not caring about scholarships. However, as far as I've seen AAMC release income distributions in quintiles so that group is as precise as I know. If anyone has data on the representation of the top 10, 5, and/or 1% of incomes among matriculants, I would be very interested to see it!
 
  • Like
Reactions: boundlesscorpuscle
Oct 17, 2017
486
788
41
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Are there any factors that would make those here not choose NYU? Like others have mentioned, I think only significant merit/need-based aid at other top schools would sway your average applicant.
For me, if cost wasn't an issue I'd be willing to turn down NYU that I liked maybe just a little more. But seeing asas how they've given me a ridiculously good merit aid offer, the only that would sway me is if another school comes close to that offer (w/o including loans). Really like my experience at NYU and exploring NYC so I'll be happy regardless.
 
Last edited:

Newyawk

2+ Year Member
Sep 30, 2016
657
1,196
81
Status
Medical Student
I can't speak for other professional fields but to me that statistic is rather surprising and disheartening because I believe (believed?) that our system of creating physicians has become extremely meritocratic, a bastion almost for other fields to strive towards; however seeing that half still come from the upper echelon of SES makes me worry there's still a lot of progress to be made and also that other fields suffer from even worse disparities without all the "safeguards" in place that we have in medicine to increase access to low income aspirants.

As for what you're saying about paying for tuition, I definitely agree. I believe that top 20% of income correlates to ~$150,000+ gross family income. I would not expect the vast majority of families with $150,000 income to be able to shell out $80k a year for their child's full COA, so I'm definitely not saying that 50% of applicants would fall under the category of not caring about scholarships. However, as far as I've seen AAMC release income distributions in quintiles so that group is as precise as I know. If anyone has data on the representation of the top 10, 5, and/or 1% of incomes among matriculants, I would be very interested to see it!
How do you define a meritocracy?
 
Mar 6, 2018
974
1,223
41
Status
Pre-Medical
How do you define a meritocracy?
Well if a democracy is a system in which the people choose who has power then I would say a meritocracy is one in which it is determined by merit. Merit to me means achievement, but achievement depends on your background. To some, graduating high school is a huge achievement because they had a lot more working against them to get to that point than someone growing up in a well off family, without learning disability, etc. The problem is its very difficult to assess achievement with respect to someone's background from an admissions standpoint, which is why imo it's best for a meritocratic system to try to give equal opportunities and reduce challenges which create discrepancies in individual achievement and how it's viewed externally. If that were achieved I believe matriculants would reflect much more closely the economic distribution of the general population.

Edit: just realized this conversation is not really on topic for the thread. Feel free to PM me or open a new thread if you want to continue
 
  • Like
Reactions: bball0718
Oct 17, 2018
458
836
41
New England
Status
Attending Physician
Are there any factors that would make those here not choose NYU? Like others have mentioned, I think only significant merit/need-based aid at other top schools would sway your average applicant.
There are some people with the 2 body problem. Whether it is 2 people applying to med school, or one to med School and one to law school/business school/phD programs, NYC is not always going to work out for the other partner. (Boston may win out sometimes, having a lot of other top tier grad and professional schools, for some couples). In addition, there are other careers that the partner may be interested in where the job market is just really tough. Lawyers and teachers have a tough time getting jobs in NYC, even though there are plenty of those types of jobs, someone coming from another part of the country might be very surprised at how hard it can be to get a job.

Moreover, those med students with children might decide NYC is a tough go in that way. When I applied to medical school, I already had 2 kids and immediately ruled out NYC due to the costs involved in raising a family in the city.

And some people will get a nice deal from some other great schools. So though the free tuition is great and they are covering living expenses for some students with great merit and/or need, there will be other students for whom the costs will be equivalent to some of their other choices.
 
Mar 6, 2018
974
1,223
41
Status
Pre-Medical
There are some people with the 2 body problem. Whether it is 2 people applying to med school, or one to med School and one to law school/business school/phD programs, NYC is not always going to work out for the other partner. (Boston may win out sometimes, having a lot of other top tier grad and professional schools, for some couples). In addition, there are other careers that the partner may be interested in where the job market is just really tough. Lawyers and teachers have a tough time getting jobs in NYC, even though there are plenty of those types of jobs, someone coming from another part of the country might be very surprised at how hard it can be to get a job.
Not even NYU can top the power of love ;)
 

Kerouac2015

2+ Year Member
Oct 28, 2015
16
4
91
Status
Pre-Medical
For the new school in Mineola, my understanding is that the guaranteed residency slot is at Mineola. Anybody have information on the quality of the residency program there vs the broader langone system?
 
  • Like
Reactions: mcmigirl
Aug 14, 2017
37
64
31
Status
Medical Student
Hey guys! We just wanted to let you all know that we have a new Instagram (@nyusomadmissions) that you guys can follow for information about admissions, financial aid, and general student life here at NYU! And, as always, you can message this account if you have any questions about NYU (or medical school life in general)- everyone on this account is a medical student with no bearing on admissions, so feel free to ask anything!
 

madiso30

2+ Year Member
Sep 21, 2015
137
178
81
Status
Pre-Medical
Is the regular NYU thread also gonna be where NYU Long Island is discussed? Sorry if this has already been said.
 
Nov 14, 2018
79
56
31
There is a thread in the main pre-allopathic forum about this new medical school:
New Medical School - NYU Long Island Medical School

@NYULI Admin can answer questions.
scroll up, an admin posted a link to a separate thread
Maybe its just me, but that link doesn't seem to be working. Anyone else having the same problem/can link me the discussion thread? Has anyone received a secondary application yet?

Also, does anyone know if international students (Canadian) are eligible for the free tuition? Is it partial, full, or no aid? If there is no aid, then is there a rough idea on the estimated cost of attendance at NYU long-island?

Thanks in advance!
 

deweystrontium

2+ Year Member
Jun 2, 2015
113
111
131
New England
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Anyone know if this school of open to letters of intent from waitlisted candidates?
 
May 13, 2017
46
43
21
Status
Pre-Medical
Question about the curriculum: Based on what I see on the website, NYU doesn't seem to have any courses/focus on stuff like the healthcare system or disparities within healthcare (I guess what you could call the sociological/humanities aspects of medicine). Am I just overlooking this or does NYU not have this focus within the curriculum? It seemed like most schools I interviewed at where making it an active point to implement these topics into their curriculum in very intentional ways so wasn't sure why/if NYU was an odd one out.
 
Oct 17, 2017
486
788
41
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Question about the curriculum: Based on what I see on the website, NYU doesn't seem to have any courses/focus on stuff like the healthcare system or disparities within healthcare (I guess what you could call the sociological/humanities aspects of medicine). Am I just overlooking this or does NYU not have this focus within the curriculum? It seemed like most schools I interviewed at where making it an active point to implement these topics into their curriculum in very intentional ways so wasn't sure why/if NYU was an odd one out.
I have found a few offering through their master scholars program in humanistic medicine.
 
Aug 14, 2017
37
64
31
Status
Medical Student
Question about the curriculum: Based on what I see on the website, NYU doesn't seem to have any courses/focus on stuff like the healthcare system or disparities within healthcare (I guess what you could call the sociological/humanities aspects of medicine). Am I just overlooking this or does NYU not have this focus within the curriculum? It seemed like most schools I interviewed at where making it an active point to implement these topics into their curriculum in very intentional ways so wasn't sure why/if NYU was an odd one out.
Hi BarryO43, thanks for the question! I'm not sure why it is not emphasized more on the website, but we do get an excellent education (from what I have seen so far, I'm a first year) about the healthcare system and disparities within healthcare. All of this falls under our practice of medicine course (along with physical exams, patient history, etc.). We've had lectures on topics varying from health insurance under the Affordable Care Act and potential future changes as well as value-based medicine from the Cheif of Medicine at NYU Brooklyn as well as lobbyists from Tisch Hospital (our private hospital) and Bellevue Hospital (our public hospital). In addition, we've had talks about the differences in our healthcare systems (private vs. public hospitals) looking at patient demographics, profits and payment systems, what patients most commonly present with, goals of the hospitals, etc. In terms of healthcare disparities, we have had lectures and small group sessions on LGBTQ healthcare disparities, and how we can try to reduce the disparities that they face. We have also had disability panels with the head of the NYC Mayor's Office of Disabilities & the head of NYPD office of disabilities, along with disabled patients, where we had the opportunity to learn about healthcare and life from their perspective, ranging from how they prefer to be addressed, difficulties in transportation (access-a-ride, etc.), and how we can be the best healthcare providers for them. In terms of humanities, NYU Langone Health offers Humanistic Medicine courses to its employees which a bunch of medical students take, including Vaccine Ethics, Inside The House of God (Led by the author of the book, Samuel Shem, who works at NYU), Art and Anatomy, End of Life Narratives, and The Art of Listening. I'm probably forgetting a bunch, but I hope this answers your question. Feel free to ask any follow-ups!
 
Last edited:

stickflip723

I wanna grow up to be a debaser
2+ Year Member
Aug 25, 2016
135
231
81
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Hi BarryO43, thanks for the question! I'm not sure why it is not emphasized more on the website, but we do get an excellent education (from what I have seen so far, I'm a first year) about the healthcare system and disparities within healthcare. All of this falls under our practice of medicine course (along with physical exams, patient history, etc.). We've had lectures on topics varying from health insurance under the Affordable Care Act and potential future changes as well as value-based medicine from the Cheif of Medicine at NYU Brooklyn as well as lobbyists from Tisch Hospital (our private hospital) and Bellevue Hospital (our public hospital). In addition, we've had talks about the differences in our healthcare systems (private vs. public hospitals) looking at patient demographics, profits and payment systems, what patients most commonly present with, goals of the hospitals, etc. In terms of healthcare disparities, we have had lectures and small group sessions on LGBTQ healthcare disparities, and how we can try to reduce the disparities that they face. We have also had disability panels with the head of the NYC Mayor's Office of Disabilities & the head of NYPD office of disabilities, along with disabled patients, where we had the opportunity to learn about healthcare and life from their perspective, ranging from how they prefer to be addressed, difficulties in transportation (access-a-ride, etc.), and how we can be the best healthcare providers for them. In terms of humanities, NYU Langone Health offers Humanistic Medicine courses to its employees which a bunch of medical students take, including Vaccine Ethics, Inside The House of God (Led by the author of the book, Samuel Shem, who works at NYU), Art and Anatomy, End of Life Narratives, and The Art of Listening. I'm probably forgetting a bunch and I hope this answers your question. Feel free to ask any follow-ups!
Holy ****, I would pay full tuition to shake Samuel Shem's hand. Had no clue he worked there.
 
  • Like
Reactions: StanleyYelnats
May 13, 2017
46
43
21
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi BarryO43, thanks for the question! I'm not sure why it is not emphasized more on the website, but we do get an excellent education (from what I have seen so far, I'm a first year) about the healthcare system and disparities within healthcare. All of this falls under our practice of medicine course (along with physical exams, patient history, etc.). We've had lectures on topics varying from health insurance under the Affordable Care Act and potential future changes as well as value-based medicine from the Cheif of Medicine at NYU Brooklyn as well as lobbyists from Tisch Hospital (our private hospital) and Bellevue Hospital (our public hospital). In addition, we've had talks about the differences in our healthcare systems (private vs. public hospitals) looking at patient demographics, profits and payment systems, what patients most commonly present with, goals of the hospitals, etc. In terms of healthcare disparities, we have had lectures and small group sessions on LGBTQ healthcare disparities, and how we can try to reduce the disparities that they face. We have also had disability panels with the head of the NYC Mayor's Office of Disabilities & the head of NYPD office of disabilities, along with disabled patients, where we had the opportunity to learn about healthcare and life from their perspective, ranging from how they prefer to be addressed, difficulties in transportation (access-a-ride, etc.), and how we can be the best healthcare providers for them. In terms of humanities, NYU Langone Health offers Humanistic Medicine courses to its employees which a bunch of medical students take, including Vaccine Ethics, Inside The House of God (Led by the author of the book, Samuel Shem, who works at NYU), Art and Anatomy, End of Life Narratives, and The Art of Listening. I'm probably forgetting a bunch, but I hope this answers your question. Feel free to ask any follow-ups!
This is fantastic, exactly what I was hoping for! Thanks so much for the detailed answer!
 
Sep 18, 2018
35
74
31
Does anyone know if the waitlist is ranked? Or if LOI's are important?
 

hms2022

2+ Year Member
Jun 14, 2016
16
10
51
Status
Pre-Medical
Updates: new 2020 USNWR rankings dropped today and NYU is #9! Down from #3 last year. Very glad to see they are trending closer to where they belong.
 
Oct 17, 2017
486
788
41
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Updates: new 2020 USNWR rankings dropped today and NYU is #9! Down from #3 last year. Very glad to see they are trending closer to where they belong.
Lol ouch. Still T10 though and I think it only changed because they changed the methodology again.