The Knife & Gun Club

MS - 4
2+ Year Member
Nov 6, 2015
2,258
4,381
81
Hollywood Upstairs Medical College
Status
Medical Student
Hi Class of 2023 - I'm a current M4 in the MD track. Im working on a longer intro to UM which I'll add here soon, but in the mean time everyone should as always post and tag me with any questions. I'm a big fan of UM and love talking about my school.

Disclaimer: I have no ties to admissions, admin, or anyone else of any importance. All info I provide should be taken with a grain of salt and is based on personal experience and not insider knowledge of how UM functions.

~Imported from below~

Why UM:
Miami is an amazing school. UM med is comprised of several institutions that all collaborate to form the medical education system here. UM Hospital and clinics is our private hospital. Its fancy, has all the latest toys, and is on the cutting edge of medical care. The Miami VA serves our veterans and has some of the best patients I’ve ever worked with. It also provides a unique look at what a true single payer healthcare system looks like – a rare thing here in the states. Finally, Jackson Memorial is our big, gritty, exciting county hospital. It serves as a safety net for all of Miami – funded by the city it will provide medical care for anyone who lives here, regardless of ability to pay, immigration status, or anything else.

Jackson is actually the 2nd largest hospital in the US (and number 8 worldwide Top 10 largest hospitals in the world). It provides medical care for the large afro-carribean and latin american immigrant populations here, many of whom have had little to no healthcare for years if not their whole lives. We see diseases that were eradicated decades ago in the rest of the US. Everything from rheumatic heart disease to dengue fever gets treated here.

We also get a remarkable amount of clinical freedom here. During the pre-clinical years the MD curriculum is very flexible, allowing for a ton of shadowing or research if that’s what you’re into. There’s also a ton of free clinics on campus and around Miami where we can work and hone our clinical skills while serving the community. As an M3 you will routinely carry your own patients on the Medicine rotation – writing notes, interpreting labs, presenting, and proposing a plan to the team. During surgery we scrub every case and usually get to close. On trauma the students gown up for every case and get to the heli-pad – even the crazy multi-gunshot polytrauma’s. On anesthesia we do the non-complicated intubations. Every student will do a lumbar puncture while on Neuro. In EM students routinely get rare procedures like crash intubations, central lines, and paracentesis. Oh and while on Pediatric Surgery I got to scrub for bedside open-heart surgery on a 5 day old baby in the NICU.

All in all, going to school in Miami is a remarkable experience. I have jaw-dropping moments every week and can feel like I helped someone in need almost every day.



Why Miami
The city of Miami is amazing. In February of this year, it was a balmy 75 degrees one day. I drove over to key Biscayne to play a game of beach volleyball against the law students. On my way back, I stopped at a dockside fish market and bought a pound of key west shrimp fresh off the boat. I took them back to my building, were we BBQd the shrimp by the pool then all sat on pool floats and spent a couple hours “studying” the week’s lectures. You can’t do that anywhere else.

I’ve also gotten very skilled at sneaking into opulent south beach resorts and hanging out by their pools. We have fancy night clubs and secret tiki bars. I don’t think I’ve ever had trouble finding something fun to do when friends are in town. We’ve got a great music scene, disappointingly adequate sports, and kick-ass [UM-Med sponsored] tailgates.


P.S. We have a rotation where you can spend a month living in Islamorada in the Florida Keys, where UM will pay to put you up in a fancy beachfront townhouse (complete with kayaks) – free of charge. If that doesn’t sell the school idk what will.
 
Last edited:

teeayejay

2+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2014
1,437
2,004
81
Status
Medical Student
Recently graduated, still love Miller, here to rep my alma mater :)! @teeayejay and @The Knife & Gun Club you guys are amazing, consistently helping students every year - the hordes of SDN are lucky to have you. Good luck to everyone this cycle!!!
Thank you! It's so crazy basically being a 4th year when it feels like just yesterday I was scouring the UM thread before I was even accepted.
 

Ferrous

Thoughtful Chimp
2+ Year Member
Apr 25, 2016
38
23
51
Status
Pre-Medical
Really interested in ophthalmology (done a ton of research in the field) and ofc Miami has the best program in the country. Is it a good idea to mention this for the Why Miami essay?
 

teeayejay

2+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2014
1,437
2,004
81
Status
Medical Student
Really interested in ophthalmology (done a ton of research in the field) and ofc Miami has the best program in the country. Is it a good idea to mention this for the Why Miami essay?
I wouldn't make this the focus but it's more than reasonable to make mention that you're considering ophtho and that Bascom is here.
 

teeayejay

2+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2014
1,437
2,004
81
Status
Medical Student
"I was wondering if you could elaborate on any thoughts about your experiences as a medical student there (i.e. research, community service, professors, location, work and study environment, etc.)?! Any advice or perspective is appreciated! Thank you!"

My favorite part of UM is that you can chase your interests in pretty much any field. If you have a strong desire for social justice and policy within medicine there's a space for that. If you're more of the bench research type person, there's a space for that too. And everything else in between. Some opportunities will fall in your lap but others you might need to show some diligence. At any rate, UM is well-funded.

Another plus for me is that it's a very "on the streets" type school. By that I mean, Miami is uniquely positioned in that it has such a diverse group of people both culturally and socioeconomically. It's dead smack in the middle of the city and smack in the middle of one of the most impoverished neighborhoods in the city. It's a great place to be trained and there's a major opportunity to learn humility and what it truly means to open yourself up to different walks of life. Also because of it's demographics, there is no shortage of volunteer opprotunities where you can do some great things if you stick with it.

Academically, the large majority of professors/lecturers are great. They work to engage the students and you actually do learn. I can't tell you the amount of times I was pimped on something on the wards and in my mind, I immediately went back to a particular lecture that I had two years prior.

I personally (and truly) don't have anything negative to say about it other than minor program logistics but no program in the nation is without fault.

Miami itself is amazing. Be comfortable with Spanish (don't have to speak it but don't be surprised if you hear it everywhere). I say that because I spoke with an undergrad at UM a couple months ago and she hated it for that reason. I love it. Otherwise, there's always something to do if you want plus the beach is 10 minutes away.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sundayko

The Knife & Gun Club

MS - 4
2+ Year Member
Nov 6, 2015
2,258
4,381
81
Hollywood Upstairs Medical College
Status
Medical Student
What made y'all choose Miami? @teeayejay @The Knife & Gun Club
Why UM:
Miami is an amazing school. UM med is comprised of several institutions that all collaborate to form the medical education system here. UM Hospital and clinics is our private hospital. Its fancy, has all the latest toys, and is on the cutting edge of medical care. The Miami VA serves our veterans and has some of the best patients I’ve ever worked with. It also provides a unique look at what a true single payer healthcare system looks like – a rare thing here in the states. Finally, Jackson Memorial is our big, gritty, exciting county hospital. It serves as a safety net for all of Miami – funded by the city it will provide medical care for anyone who lives here, regardless of ability to pay, immigration status, or anything else.

Jackson is actually the 2nd largest hospital in the US (and number 8 worldwide Top 10 largest hospitals in the world). It provides medical care for the large afro-carribean and latin american immigrant populations here, many of whom have had little to no healthcare for years if not their whole lives. We see diseases that were eradicated decades ago in the rest of the US. Everything from rheumatic heart disease to dengue fever gets treated here.

We also get a remarkable amount of clinical freedom here. During the pre-clinical years the MD curriculum is very flexible, allowing for a ton of shadowing or research if that’s what you’re into. There’s also a ton of free clinics on campus and around Miami where we can work and hone our clinical skills while serving the community. As an M3 you will routinely carry your own patients on the Medicine rotation – writing notes, interpreting labs, presenting, and proposing a plan to the team. During surgery we scrub every case and usually get to close. On trauma the students gown up for every case and get to the heli-pad – even the crazy multi-gunshot polytrauma’s. On anesthesia we do the non-complicated intubations. Every student will do a lumbar puncture while on Neuro. In EM students routinely get rare procedures like crash intubations, central lines, and paracentesis. Oh and while on Pediatric Surgery I got to scrub for bedside open-heart surgery on a 5 day old baby in the NICU.

All in all, going to school in Miami is a remarkable experience. I have jaw-dropping moments every week and can feel like I helped someone in need almost every day.



Why Miami
The city of Miami is amazing. In February of this year, it was a balmy 75 degrees one day. I drove over to key Biscayne to play a game of beach volleyball against the law students. On my way back, I stopped at a dockside fish market and bought a pound of key west shrimp fresh off the boat. I took them back to my building, were we BBQd the shrimp by the pool then all sat on pool floats and spent a couple hours “studying” the week’s lectures. You can’t do that anywhere else.

I’ve also gotten very skilled at sneaking into opulent south beach resorts and hanging out by their pools. We have fancy night clubs and secret tiki bars. I don’t think I’ve ever had trouble finding something fun to do when friends are in town. We’ve got a great music scene, disappointingly adequate sports, and kick-ass [UM-Med sponsored] tailgates.


P.S. We have an M3 rotation where you can spend a month living in Islamorada in the Florida Keys, where UM will pay to put you up in a fancy beachfront townhouse (complete with kayaks) – free of charge. If that doesn’t sell the school idk what will.
 
Oct 17, 2017
502
813
41
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Why UM:
Miami is an amazing school. UM med is comprised of several institutions that all collaborate to form the medical education system here. UM Hospital and clinics is our private hospital. Its fancy, has all the latest toys, and is on the cutting edge of medical care. The Miami VA serves our veterans and has some of the best patients I’ve ever worked with. It also provides a unique look at what a true single payer healthcare system looks like – a rare thing here in the states. Finally, Jackson Memorial is our big, gritty, exciting county hospital. It serves as a safety net for all of Miami – funded by the city it will provide medical care for anyone who lives here, regardless of ability to pay, immigration status, or anything else.

Jackson is actually the 2nd largest hospital in the US (and number 8 worldwide Top 10 largest hospitals in the world). It provides medical care for the large afro-carribean and latin american immigrant populations here, many of whom have had little to no healthcare for years if not their whole lives. We see diseases that were eradicated decades ago in the rest of the US. Everything from rheumatic heart disease to dengue fever gets treated here.

We also get a remarkable amount of clinical freedom here. During the pre-clinical years the MD curriculum is very flexible, allowing for a ton of shadowing or research if that’s what you’re into. There’s also a ton of free clinics on campus and around Miami where we can work and hone our clinical skills while serving the community. As an M3 you will routinely carry your own patients on the Medicine rotation – writing notes, interpreting labs, presenting, and proposing a plan to the team. During surgery we scrub every case and usually get to close. On trauma the students gown up for every case and get to the heli-pad – even the crazy multi-gunshot polytrauma’s. On anesthesia we do the non-complicated intubations. Every student will do a lumbar puncture while on Neuro. In EM students routinely get rare procedures like crash intubations, central lines, and paracentesis. Oh and while on Pediatric Surgery I got to scrub for bedside open-heart surgery on a 5 day old baby in the NICU.

All in all, going to school in Miami is a remarkable experience. I have jaw-dropping moments every week and can feel like I helped someone in need almost every day.



Why Miami
The city of Miami is amazing. In February of this year, it was a balmy 75 degrees one day. I drove over to key Biscayne to play a game of beach volleyball against the law students. On my way back, I stopped at a dockside fish market and bought a pound of key west shrimp fresh off the boat. I took them back to my building, were we BBQd the shrimp by the pool then all sat on pool floats and spent a couple hours “studying” the week’s lectures. You can’t do that anywhere else.

I’ve also gotten very skilled at sneaking into opulent south beach resorts and hanging out by their pools. We have fancy night clubs and secret tiki bars. I don’t think I’ve ever had trouble finding something fun to do when friends are in town. We’ve got a great music scene, disappointingly adequate sports, and kick-ass [UM-Med sponsored] tailgates.


P.S. We have an M3 rotation where you can spend a month living in Islamorada in the Florida Keys, where UM will pay to put you up in a fancy beachfront townhouse (complete with kayaks) – free of charge. If that doesn’t sell the school idk what will.
This right here. As a FL resident wanting to go OOS for med school, Miller was the only state school, I was willing to stay in Florida for. Went to UM undergrad and it was the best four years of my life so far. Good luck to everyone applying here this cycle.
 

teeayejay

2+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2014
1,437
2,004
81
Status
Medical Student
@teeayejay @The Knife & Gun Club Thanks for all of the wonderful insight you provided. I wanted to ask about how much of a concern hurricanes are in the UM area? Is this something you factored into your decision when applying?
I actually hadn't made that a consideration at all when choosing. We had one each my first two years but nothing happened last year. I wouldn't hold too much weight to it but that's a personal choice because anything can happen.
 

The Knife & Gun Club

MS - 4
2+ Year Member
Nov 6, 2015
2,258
4,381
81
Hollywood Upstairs Medical College
Status
Medical Student
@teeayejay @The Knife & Gun Club Thanks for all of the wonderful insight you provided. I wanted to ask about how much of a concern hurricanes are in the UM area? Is this something you factored into your decision when applying?
So for me as a Florida native I was kind of bummed when I moved away for college and we didn’t get hurricanes anymore. The reality is they are not as scary as people make them out to be - usually just knock out power and bring down some trees - no worse than a bad snow storm.

But if I’m being serious I’d be less concerned about hurricanes in Miami than I would about hurricanes in any of the other southern/gulf coast cities. Reality is Miami is built for hurricanes. We know we’re gonna get hit, so the buildings here are concrete block (not wood) and all the buildings in brickell have hurricane glass.
 

sundayko

SDN Bronze Donor
Bronze Donor
Dec 30, 2017
10
6
11
Status
Pre-Medical
@The Knife & Gun Club Hi! I couldn't find much information about how Miami-Miller students handle the step exams. For example, how did your studying go for Step 1? Does the school factor study time into the curriculum or did you feel that you had to squeeze studying in?
 
May 28, 2019
12
4
1
Status
Pre-Medical
I would love to hear from any current students what they like from Miami’s curriculum itself? How classes are taught/what’s taught when and how that benefits them, etc. thank you!
 

yakarma11

2+ Year Member
Jun 16, 2016
164
195
81
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Mar 16, 2019
7
0
1
Does anyone know the MCAT 10%/25% scores including for the Biology subsection? How many students aged 30+ approx are accepted per cycle? My MSAR just expired and this was the last school I still had to research :bucktooth:.

Also, what is the deal with Spanish there. I thought you used to have to take a spanish course , but now it seems that's no longer a requirement? I speak a few words here and there but I've forgotten most of what I learned in HS. I've seen some comments about how it's not required but that you may be at a disadvantage as english is not the first language for many profs/staff and patients (LORs, favoritism etc). Thanks!
 
Oct 25, 2018
247
267
41
Does anyone know the MCAT 10%/25% scores including for the Biology subsection? How many students aged 30+ approx are accepted per cycle? My MSAR just expired and this was the last school I still had to research :bucktooth:.

Also, what is the deal with Spanish there. I thought you used to have to take a spanish course , but now it seems that's no longer a requirement? I speak a few words here and there but I've forgotten most of what I learned in HS. I've seen some comments about how it's not required but that you may be at a disadvantage as english is not the first language for many profs/staff and patients (LORs, favoritism etc). Thanks!
For matriculants, they are 507 and 510. For B/B they are 126 and 127. From 2016-2018 there have been 8, 4, and 3 people that are 30+ years old. Not sure about the Spanish requirements. Yeah, it's definitely a plus to know Spanish in Miami.
 
  • Like
Reactions: tinyhandsbob
Jun 5, 2019
9
9
11
Status
Pre-Medical
Spanish is not necessary at all. The medical center there is the 2nd busiest hospital in the country, treating an incredibly varied international population that speaks all different languages. People travel the world to get to Miami health care. Everyone uses Google translate....Spanish is just one dialect of hundreds. My sister speaks not one word of Spanish and it has not been an issue even once.