2012-2013 New York University Application Thread

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gettheleadout

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1.If applicable, please comment on significant fluctuations in your academic record which are not explained elsewhere on your application.


2.If you have taken any time off from your studies, either during or after college, please describe what you have done during this time and your reasons for doing so.



Essays: The following questions are designed to assess ways in which you embody our institution's core values. Please limit each answer to a maximum of 2500 characters.

1.The Admissions Committee uses a holistic approach to evaluate a wide range of student qualities and life experiences that are complementary to demonstrated academic excellence, strong interpersonal skills and leadership potential. What unique qualities or experiences do you possess that would contribute specifically to the NYU School of Medicine community?



2.The ultimate goal of our institution is to produce a population of physicians with a collective desire to improve health of all segments of our society through the outstanding patient care, research and education. In this context, where do you see your future medical career (academic medicine, research, public health, primary care, business/law, etc.) and why? Your answer need not be restricted to one category. If your plans require that you complete a dual degree program, please elaborate here.



3.Please answer only one of the following three questions:

a.The most meaningful achievements are often non-academic in nature. Describe the personal accomplishment that makes you most proud. Why is this important to you?

b.Conflicts arise daily from differences in perspectives, priorities, worldviews and traditions. How do you define respect? Describe a situation in which you found it challenging to remain respectful while facing differences?

c.Describe a situation in which working with a colleague, family member or friend has been challenging. How did you resolve, if at all, the situation as a team and what did you gain from the experience that will benefit you as a future health care provider?

Good luck to everyone applying! :luck:

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I'm applying to multiple schools in NY; but NYU is definitely my #1 choice! Hoping to get some OOS love here as well!
 
This is one of my dream schools. I'll apply here, but I have no idea how I'll fare.
 
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keeping my fingers crossed for this school. I really wanna go to school in NY!
 
Yay NYU!
Let me mark this thread, I will come back later.
 
Don't mind me, just another applicant....
 
Man going to NYU would be a dream. Submitted my application today, hoping to definitely hear from this school *crosses fingers*
 
Applying to NYU. What were NYU's prompts last year and what should I know about NYU in general?
 
My #1 choice. That secondary is beastly though--not looking forward to it :laugh:

Good luck everyone
 
So, got in here last cycle (2011-12) and will attend. Let me know if you have any questions about the application process!
 
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How do they do interviews?
So the interview process here is somewhat long in comparison to a lot of other schools I interviewed at. You only have one interview with someone at an assigned time, and they only have about 4 faculty members doing interviews. That means you have to sit in the reception area for a LONG time, regardless of when your interview is. The interview itself is only about 30 min long, but it's really low key and not stressful at all. And depending on the day med students will trickle in to say hi and meet you and such while you're waiting for an interview.
 
I agree with the above. A lot of kicking it in the admissions office until they call you for your interview. You only have one and it is supposed to last 30min; I had a pretty good rapport with my interviewer so it lasted close to 45 or 50 minutes.

I was pretty impressed with his questions. Some standard ones: "tell me about such and such extracurricular", "tell me about your clinical experiences", etc but a few pretty stand out ones: "imagine you have a friend that partied a little too hard the night before and seems to still be drunk during his clinical rotation; how would you handle it?" also, imagine you got sick this morning and couldn't attend the interview; we allow you to choose one person to represent you: who would it be, why, and what would they say?" Also, a big one: "why NYU?" NYU shares a city with some great schools some of which you've most definitely applied to; they want to why your dead set on NYU if you get in.

I can give you my answer for the last one if you care to know it.
 
I agree with the above. A lot of kicking it in the admissions office until they call you for your interview. You only have one and it is supposed to last 30min; I had a pretty good rapport with my interviewer so it lasted close to 45 or 50 minutes.

I was pretty impressed with his questions. Some standard ones: "tell me about such and such extracurricular", "tell me about your clinical experiences", etc but a few pretty stand out ones: "imagine you have a friend that partied a little too hard the night before and seems to still be drunk during his clinical rotation; how would you handle it?" also, imagine you got sick this morning and couldn't attend the interview; we allow you to choose one person to represent you: who would it be, why, and what would they say?" Also, a big one: "why NYU?" NYU shares a city with some great schools some of which you've most definitely applied to; they want to why your dead set on NYU if you get in.

I can give you my answer for the last one if you care to know it.

Let's hear it please! :)
 
*The pre-clinical curriculum is totally integrated which has allowed for a more streamlined presentation and elimination of redundancies. This translates to 18 months of pre-clinical coursework compared to 2 years everywhere else.

*Due to the above, you complete your core clerkships at the end of year three, which gives you plenty of time to do electives, selectives, and sub internships, which NYU has a HUGE amount of. NYU is also the only school that allows you to do a "concentration" (its like a major within medicine). This theoretically allows you to make a more informed decision about residency selection.

*Pass/fail all four years. This leads to an incredibly collaborative student body. However, I believe Columbia, Sinai, and Cornell are also pass/fail

*You take Step 1 at the end of year three not year two as with the other schools. Their idea is that applying basic sciences on the wards gives students context. NYU has very high Step 1 scores, so apparently this works.

*"Practice of Medicine" course for all 18 months of pre-clinical curriculum combines ethics, social medicine, and P&H into one course.

*"Pillars of Medicine" takes disease states that will be prevalent throughout the 21st century and weaves them through the pre-clinical curriculum. Some of the pillars are diabetes, colon cancer, and arteriosclerosis. You learn about these diseases on a molecular/physiological level but also meet with patients who have the diseases to understand the socio-cultural and clinical aspects of each one.

*Patient-based longitudinal ambulatory experience (P.L.A.C.E) pairs students up with several patients with chronic diseases at the beginning of year and then you follow them for the 18 months of the pre-clinical curriculum. The idea is that you learn about disease as a progression, learn bed side manner, and build strong relationships with patients.

*NYU puts a huge emphasis on international health projects for its students. It has a commitment to fund up to 80%/2500 dollars of an student initiated project though a specially created department of global health.

The above is what really sold NYU for me. There are other little things that are a bit gimmicky but are still neat. For example, Anatomy 2.0 is a 3D projector program ((complete with 3D classes) in the anatomy lab that allows you to manipulate the body in three dimensions and supposedly complements dissection.
 
*The pre-clinical curriculum is totally integrated which has allowed for a more streamlined presentation and elimination of redundancies. This translates to 18 months of pre-clinical coursework compared to 2 years everywhere else.

*Due to the above, you complete your core clerkships at the end of year three, which gives you plenty of time to do electives, selectives, and sub internships, which NYU has a HUGE amount of. NYU is also the only school that allows you to do a "concentration" (its like a major within medicine). This theoretically allows you to make a more informed decision about residency selection.

*Pass/fail all four years. This leads to an incredibly collaborative student body. However, I believe Columbia, Sinai, and Cornell are also pass/fail

*You take Step 1 at the end of year three not year two as with the other schools. Their idea is that applying basic sciences on the wards gives students context. NYU has very high Step 1 scores, so apparently this works.

*"Practice of Medicine" course for all 18 months of pre-clinical curriculum combines ethics, social medicine, and P&H into one course.

*"Pillars of Medicine" takes disease states that will be prevalent throughout the 21st century and weaves them through the pre-clinical curriculum. Some of the pillars are diabetes, colon cancer, and arteriosclerosis. You learn about these diseases on a molecular/physiological level but also meet with patients who have the diseases to understand the socio-cultural and clinical aspects of each one.

*Patient-based longitudinal ambulatory experience (P.L.A.C.E) pairs students up with several patients with chronic diseases at the beginning of year and then you follow them for the 18 months of the pre-clinical curriculum. The idea is that you learn about disease as a progression, learn bed side manner, and build strong relationships with patients.

*NYU puts a huge emphasis on international health projects for its students. It has a commitment to fund up to 80%/2500 dollars of an student initiated project though a specially created department of global health.

The above is what really sold NYU for me. There are other little things that are a bit gimmicky but are still neat. For example, Anatomy 2.0 is a 3D projector program ((complete with 3D classes) in the anatomy lab that allows you to manipulate the body in three dimensions and supposedly complements dissection.

Many of the above are reasons why I chose NYU, but I do have to add that one point above isn't entirely accurate. The curriculum is P/F mostly for the pre-clinical years (the first 1.5 years). Clerkships, and the more involved selectives are still graded with the traditional H/HP/P/F scheme. Electives do get graded P/F though. Regardless, having a P/F curriculum for the pre-clinical years is a pretty nice deal :D
 
How do they do interviews?

Interview Day:
10-11 Morning interviews
11-12 - Tour of SoM/Medical Center
12-1 - Lunch / student panel
1-2 Tour of Bellevue & Vilcek Hall
2-3 Afternoon interviews

I think this is pretty much the set-up.
You will have either a morning or afternoon interview, so obviously you can show up at 10 or leave at 2 depending on which one you have (since yes, you only have 1 interview)
Dunno if we're changing anything for this year

*The pre-clinical curriculum is totally integrated which has allowed for a more streamlined presentation and elimination of redundancies. This translates to 18 months of pre-clinical coursework compared to 2 years everywhere else.

*Due to the above, you complete your core clerkships at the end of year three, which gives you plenty of time to do electives, selectives, and sub internships, which NYU has a HUGE amount of. NYU is also the only school that allows you to do a "concentration" (its like a major within medicine). This theoretically allows you to make a more informed decision about residency selection.

*Pass/fail all four years. This leads to an incredibly collaborative student body. However, I believe Columbia, Sinai, and Cornell are also pass/fail

*You take Step 1 at the end of year three not year two as with the other schools. Their idea is that applying basic sciences on the wards gives students context. NYU has very high Step 1 scores, so apparently this works.

*"Practice of Medicine" course for all 18 months of pre-clinical curriculum combines ethics, social medicine, and P&H into one course.

*"Pillars of Medicine" takes disease states that will be prevalent throughout the 21st century and weaves them through the pre-clinical curriculum. Some of the pillars are diabetes, colon cancer, and arteriosclerosis. You learn about these diseases on a molecular/physiological level but also meet with patients who have the diseases to understand the socio-cultural and clinical aspects of each one.

*Patient-based longitudinal ambulatory experience (P.L.A.C.E) pairs students up with several patients with chronic diseases at the beginning of year and then you follow them for the 18 months of the pre-clinical curriculum. The idea is that you learn about disease as a progression, learn bed side manner, and build strong relationships with patients.

*NYU puts a huge emphasis on international health projects for its students. It has a commitment to fund up to 80%/2500 dollars of an student initiated project though a specially created department of global health.

The above is what really sold NYU for me. There are other little things that are a bit gimmicky but are still neat. For example, Anatomy 2.0 is a 3D projector program ((complete with 3D classes) in the anatomy lab that allows you to manipulate the body in three dimensions and supposedly complements dissection.

First off, props on doing your research. All schools love to hear this.
Secondly. It's so weird hearing this mostly b/c POM is possibly the worst thing known to man. We have it once / week for 2 hrs and it's usually a waste of time. It gets better 2nd semester when you actually learn & practice physical exam skills. But it's almost unanimously the bane of everyone's existence.

PLACE -- very few people can find a Longitudinal Patient. It usually turns into shadowing.

It's also only P/F only for the pre-clinical curriculum (1st 3 semesters). Once you hit the wards it's a 5-interval grading system -- I don't think you'll find P/F on the wards at any school. If you do, it just means they're secretly grading you.

The class of 2014 was the 1st class to be part of the new curriculum. They're currently 1/2 way through their clerkships, and haven't taken Step 1 yet -- data is still out on how the boards/wards flip-flop affect scores.

To go along w/ the 3D anatomy thing (aka people who like shiny toys):
http://redaf.med.nyu.edu/new-york-simulation-center-health-sciences-–-bellevue-hospital
This place is epic. As the article says, it just opened in the fall of 2011. We get to do all our OSCEs there.

I think you forgot the most important piece: Bellevue
Not only do you get more independence there as a med student/intern/resident/fellow, you get to see (a) the craziest **** and (b) stuff from ALL AROUND THE WORLD. It's probably the most unique hospital in the country. As first years, we get to go in and practice H&P on patients ~6 times throughout 2nd semester (of POM). HUGE asset.
 
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Good clarification. Clerkships and Selectives do include the HP and Honors distinctions. Sorry for the inaccuracy!
 
While I'm not familiar with Sinai all that much, aside from interviewing there, I would hazard a guess that both schools have a pretty equivocal reputation overall, (some specialties in the respective hospital will be different, but that's all I can really think of.
In regards to diversity I feel as though NYU did a better job of that, again only going off of my interview day at Sinai, and from my current knowledge of NYU's class, which I'm part of.
Both schools can offer up to full tuition scholarships, though I got the impression that NYU has more money overall than Sinai as they made the point of saying how they had gotten like a billion dollars in donations over the past 3 years or something.
Selectivity-wise I would say both are very selective, but NYU seems like it has much more waitlist movement than Sinai, so I guess overall Sinai is more selective.

Again with the above I'm going off of my interview days at Sinai/NYU as well as additional knowledge I've gained after being accepted to NYU. If I had the choice between the two I would choose NYU as it is located closer to downtown New York. However, from what I remember, Sinai had MUCH nicer housing facilities for students, just a few aspects to consider if you interview at both.
 
Got the secondary email yesterday. Looks pretty straightforward. Anyone know what they mean on the FAQ page that they don't accept any "exempt" credit for any required course? Would that apply to departmental exams that I used to exempt out of courses?
 
Got the secondary email yesterday. Looks pretty straightforward. Anyone know what they mean on the FAQ page that they don't accept any "exempt" credit for any required course? Would that apply to departmental exams that I used to exempt out of courses?

What are the prompts? Same questions as last year?
 
On page 2 under "Course" are you guys putting course names (i.e. Biology 1) or course numbers ( i.e. BIO 101)?

EDIT: And does "Lab?" refer to whether a course included a lab, or if the course was a lab by itself?
 
were you all verified before you received the secondary ?
 
Got the secondary email yesterday. Looks pretty straightforward. Anyone know what they mean on the FAQ page that they don't accept any "exempt" credit for any required course? Would that apply to departmental exams that I used to exempt out of courses?

Yeah I think it means that while one may apply AP credit to certain requirements, departmental placement exams cannot be used in this way.
 
I still haven't gotten mine and I've been verified since 6/20.
 
Just received my secondary. I was verified on 6/06 as well. Good luck!

The email states that we can't copy/paste essays into the application. Does this mean we have to type directly into the application? If so, that sucks!
 
OK, for the course name, do they want us to write "General Biology I" or "BIOL 101"?
 
Got this secondary today: Is anyone applying MSTP and see an option for MD/PhD under the dual degree drop box?
 
OK, for the course name, do they want us to write "General Biology I" or "BIOL 101"?
I think they want General Biology I because it asks for course name, not number. Hope that helps!
 
Received a secondary, but it says that I have no letters. My committee letter was received by AMCAS in late May, and I was verified on 6/7. All the other schools that have sent me secondaries have received my letter from AMCAS automatically.

Is it just me, or are other people experiencing this?
 
It states that I don't have any letters in either, but my letters have been on AMCAS for ~ a month now. So I don't think you have to worry. I believe once you submit your secondary, then they'll update your letter of recommendations.
 
Received a secondary, but it says that I have no letters. My committee letter was received by AMCAS in late May, and I was verified on 6/7. All the other schools that have sent me secondaries have received my letter from AMCAS automatically.

Is it just me, or are other people experiencing this?

I called earlier about this and the lady said they are using a new system and the letters should be uploaded tomorrow. She said the letters are definitely there.
 
I called earlier about this and the lady said they are using a new system and the letters should be uploaded tomorrow. She said the letters are definitely there.

Nice! Just submitted my secondary. Hopefully I can get some OOS from NYU! :xf::xf:
 
Just received my secondary. I was verified on 6/06 as well. Good luck!

The email states that we can't copy/paste essays into the application. Does this mean we have to type directly into the application? If so, that sucks!

Just FYI, it does say that, but if you copy and paste your stuff into a text editor on your computer, text edit on mac or notepad on a pc, then you can copy and paste it over without a problem. That's what I did last year, and nothing was wrong with it.
 
I was verified on 6/06 and didn't get secondary. Just be patient

Last year my secondary invite was sent to my spam mail, i didn't see it until 3 weeks after it was sent. HTH
 
Just FYI, it does say that, but if you copy and paste your stuff into a text editor on your computer, text edit on mac or notepad on a pc, then you can copy and paste it over without a problem. That's what I did last year, and nothing was wrong with it.

My session timed out and I lost all of my essays. Luckily, I had them saved in a Word document. I was really paranoid about the copy and paste thing, though, so I re-typed everything. Such a pain...
 
Just like the person I spoke to yesterday said, my letters have been uploaded. I hope the same is true for everyone else.
 
For NYU's requirements do you just need a years worth of the specific requirements or do you need to put in every chemistry course, every biology course, etc...
 
For NYU's requirements do you just need a years worth of the specific requirements or do you need to put in every chemistry course, every biology course, etc...

I just put the years worth of requirements.
 
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