nekoatsume

2+ Year Member
Jan 5, 2017
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Medical Student (Accepted)
Dec 12, 2018
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I wonder if the FA packages were awarded based on who they want the most. Anyone knows?
My sense is that would be unfair - I can't imagine they would do that. Unless merit scholarships are included in the package. My understanding is that it's need-based only. I may be wrong, though.
 

Tigriski

2+ Year Member
Mar 21, 2016
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Pre-Medical
I wonder if the FA packages were awarded based on who they want the most. Anyone knows?
It's need-based only. so no. They essentially have a rank of students based on the combination of students income and their parents income (if they applied for institutional aid you were required to submit those tax returns, plus asset information. Like if you own a business or equity in your home or how many liquid assets you have). The less you have less of these sources of wealth the more needy you are, the more aid you get. So its a system that likely doesn't help students with moderately to flat-out wealthy parents. Unless the class would be so that everyone is wealthy. So lets say a person makes 100k a year yet everyone else still makes more. that person with 100k would be the most needy. Lots of rich people are going to medical school, but this scenario very likely is NOT the norm. And if youre wealthy and your parents are choosing to not help you then it's sorry about your luck. At least the option existed that they could help you\rather than it being absolutely impossible in the first place. This then spirals into the philosophy of charity and a role a a parent in their child's education and life trajectory... hope this helps understanding their need-based aid system.

Source? I met with the office of FA during second look

this is also why they do not match scholarships from other schools. They have their own tools to measure need and try to implement them equitably. So considering another schools offer goes against this whole process of determining need
 
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helloppl

2+ Year Member
Jul 6, 2015
65
48
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Status
Pre-Medical
It's need-based only. so no. They essentially have a rank of students based on the combination of students income and their parents income (if they applied for institutional aid you were required to submit those tax returns, plus asset information. Like if you own a business or equity in your home or how many liquid assets you have). The less you have less of these sources of wealth the more needy you are, the more aid you get. So its a system that likely doesn't help students with moderately to flat-out wealthy parents. Unless the class would be so that everyone is wealthy. So lets say a person makes 100k a year yet everyone else still makes more. that person with 100k would be the most needy. Lots of rich people are going to medical school, but this scenario very likely is NOT the norm. And if youre wealthy and your parents are choosing to not help you then it's sorry about your luck. At least the option existed that they could help you\rather than it being absolutely impossible in the first place. This then spirals into the philosophy of charity and a role a a parent in their child's education and life trajectory... hope this helps understanding their need-based aid system.

Source? I met with the office of FA during second look

this is also why they do not match scholarships from other schools. They have their own tools to measure need and try to implement them equitably. So considering another schools offer goes against this whole process of determining need
If that's the case, shouldn't they send out everyone's FA awards all at once? They are sending the awards out in batches, which is what makes me suspect there may be additional factors other than 'need' in determining who receives FA first and how much is awarded. Just personal opinion, not backed up by any verified info!
 

Tigriski

2+ Year Member
Mar 21, 2016
50
30
111
Status
Pre-Medical
If that's the case, shouldn't they send out everyone's FA awards all at once? They are sending the awards out in batches, which is what makes me suspect there may be additional factors other than 'need' in determining who receives FA first and how much is awarded. Just personal opinion, not backed up by any verified info!
this is a good point. I can tell you that I was given a package that made me choose tufts over my state school. And i did not receive my package in the "first" batch of students. I do know they have financial advisors for groups of students, divided up like A-G, H-P etc. Maybe one advisor has more people so it takes longer to produce all those packages at once? idk just tossing out a random guess.